“Yasmin How You Know?” Book Review: From a heart

By | August 30, 2012

A crony of a late Yasmin Ahmad is changed by memories of a filmmaker that have been gathered into a book.

Yasmin How You Know?
Publisher: Leo Burnett-Arc Malaysia,
192 pages

HAS it been 3 years given Yasmin Ahmad left us? It has, and we can’t trust it.

Yasmin How You Know?

Yasmin How You Know?

Her ever-inquisitive gawk stays clear in my mind, and her delivery of Christopher Cross’ song, Sailing, on that one stormy afternoon as we sat in her office, resonates in my ear any time we consider of her.

And when that happens, a pain of losing her always earnings and would never lessen but many bid – until we found condolence in this smashing book, Yasmin How You Know?

From it, we learnt that Yasmin sang and played a guitar well. As we kept reading a book, Cross’ strain resounded again, and we remembered one line in particular: “Well, it’s not distant down to paradise, during slightest it’s not for me.”

The initial design of Yasmin in a book had me shouting like a drain. It portrays splendidly her frolic and clarity of ridiculous: she has a simper on her face, her eyes shut, and a finger adult her nostril! Her hair is totally combed behind and a lines of her palm are prominent.

These lines, to me, are lines of wit and wisdom, many of that is fondly remembered by friends and splendidly gathered in this book by her colleagues in Leo Burnett-Arc Malaysia, where she worked for many years and where she done those oh-so-evocative TV ads for festivals and Merdeka Day.

As Yasmin would certainly have wanted it, this book is designed with simplicity, a beauty of that we usually came to conclude since of Yasmin. Speak some-more with reduction is what she taught me. And if we disagreed, as we would initially, she would fuss quietly, “Simplicity is a hardest thing to achieve, Abby.”

Indeed, her films showed she was right about reduction being more. Fittingly, all pronounced in this book is kindly recollected in abruptness that is nonetheless musical and enlightening.

“It is ideal to be imperfect, since soundness is done adult of many imperfections put together that creates it perfect.” What could be sounder? The difference are etched in a mind of Eugene Yong, Yasmin’s crony and colleague, and relate in cave as we continue to file my soundness with imperfections.

“What your right palm gives, even we left palm should not know”, was another element Yasmin always attempted to live by; it was usually after her genocide (of a cadence on Jul 25, 2009; she was 51) that stories began to emerge of her inexhaustible and unknown gifts of income to everybody from orphans to indie filmmakers. This element by distant strikes me a most, and now those lines on her hands also imply to me her many generosities, any kept from one another.

“For those who like that arrange of thing, that’s a arrange of thing they like” was Yasmin’s approach of observant that we do not need to heed to others whose preferences and beliefs differ from ours. Troubled newly by tellurian hideosity and mediocrity, we travel on now with palliate newly proficient by all a smashing anecdotes in a pages of this book.

Whether it is work, love, art, attitude, skills, or life, Yasmin approached all with a quirkiness that done all fun and training from her, intuitive. At a right impulse when her quirkiness poked during premonition and her frankness overwhelmed a heart, one would see a light during a finish of a hovel and take home a whole new opinion on life.

“A grin and kind word will get we further,” Sharifah Armani recalls, and Yasmin led by example.

“Don’t demeanour down on those next you. And don’t fear those above you,” fondly remembers Jo-Chan – we have privately witnessed many a time when Yasmin was kind to people next her.

“Do we wish a benevolence of food, or a benevolence of a one who puts benevolence in food?” Yasmin asked Ke-Cure, her crony who was improving from a viral fever. Like Ke-Cure, we wish both, and this book has both. It is food if food is homogeneous to books for book lovers, with a benevolence of a one who put benevolence into this book: Yasmin who lived life so generously, aesthetically, humanely, wisely, and many caringly.

Yasmin asked Ke-Cure to spin to God, for a provision is what God bestows.

“On no essence does God place a weight larger than it can bear.” Her spirituality was always inspiring. Hence, a book dedicated to a righteous Muslim must, understandably, embody verses from a Quran, one of a many pleasing being: “And a slaves of a Most Beneficent are those who travel on a earth in piety and sedateness, and when a ridiculous residence them (with bad words) they respond behind with amiable difference of gentleness.”

That was how Yasmin responded to a critics of her infrequently argumentative films; films that went on to win countless general awards.

This book is a collection of Yasmin’s pesan-pesan (messages). It also contains some of her poems and musings that are impossibly moving. They were created simply, in artistic poetry true from her heart, as she believed it is from a heart that we tell a many relocating stories.

“… let me ask we / Have we ever listened a harmony so rich, / or review a publishing so fine, / that it could prove craving improved than fish?” Yasmin wrote in one of her poems.

Well, we consider we have, Yasmin. Our craving once in a while for a small bit of your sold knowledge and wit to helps us cranky uneasy waters or overcome uneasy thoughts will be confident by this book.

Yasmin How You Know? is a “sincerity of unmanufactured pleasures” bestowed by many people fondly remembering a essence that over too soon. – By ABBY WONG

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