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Chinese New Year

MALAYSIA SUPER SALE 

The Malaysia Super Sale will begin on 1 February until 15 March, offering shoppers 43 days of discounts and bargains at shopping malls and retail outlets nationwide.

The sale season coincides with significant celebrations including Valentine’s Day on 14 February as well as Chinese New Year on 16 and 17 February, thus providing ample opportunities for shoppers to make advanced preparations for the special day.

Shoppers can expect not only discounts of up to 70% on goods and services but also marvel at the gorgeous decorations put up at each shopping mall.

Among the shopping malls in the Klang Valley contributing towards the excitement of the sale, season is Pavilion KL, Sunway Pyramid, Sunway Putra Mall and Sungei Wang.

At Pavilion KL, the Chinese New Year decorations begin at the iconic landmark just outside the entrance of the mall at the Pavilion Crystal Fountain where shoppers can toss a coin to make a wish. Then step into the colorful gardens of the Main Entrance where flower blooms cascade from above “blessing” those who visit. Pavilion KL’s “Dream Garden of Prosperity” theme goes all out to bless its visitors with good wishes and prosperity. It’s all part of the Visit Pavilion KL 2018 campaign to encourage more people to stopover at the award-winning mall.

Meanwhile, Sunway Pyramid goes with “The Merriment of Spring” theme, rewarding shoppers with a chance to grab All-Season Prosperity Angpows and Reunion Dining Sets. A photo booth featuring a traditional tea house set-up is where shoppers can snap as many photos as they want. There is also a variety of stalls selling the usual Chinese New Year offerings such as beard candy, traditional candies, calligraphy, fresh flowers, and traditional costumes. Shoppers can also enjoy lion dance performances every Saturday at the Concourse.

Not to be outdone, Sunway Putra Mall will ring in the celebrations with its “Wind of Blessings” theme. Visit the Flower Market by Green Pasture selling bountiful blooms, or look out for festive essentials at the Spring Bazaar. Apart from that, there are also great deals and irresistible offers at RM8 at selected outlets. Lion dance performances and art and craft activities are also scheduled while the public are encouraged to toss their wishes at the Tree of Blessings for a special someone and the mall will grant selected wishes. To add to the festive atmosphere, there will be a “Mandarin Orange Eating Competition” for the public to participate and win amazing prizes.

Sungei Wang, one of the oldest shopping malls in KL, is also ready to usher in the year of Earth Dog with the theme “Sungei Wang Garden of Wealth” to spread wealth and prosperity to all its visitors. One of the main highlights at the mall is the Golden Money Tree Ang Pao Pick where shoppers have a chance to win the grand prize of RM888 cash if they are lucky enough to choose the right red envelope! Also not to be missed at the mall is the attempt by the QiLing Dragon Lion Dance Association to enter the Malaysia Book of Records for the title of Longest LED Dragon Dance. The dragon, at a whopping length of 668 feet, will be paraded around the entire Bukit Bintang area at 7pm on 3 February.

 

Other shopping malls are also going all out to make this sale season a spectacular one. Don’t forget to check out Fahreneit88 with their “Bundles of Luck” celebration; Intermark Mall with their “Streams of Harmony” theme; Suria KLCC with their daily prosperity giveaways; and more!

While shopping in Malaysia is considered one of the popular tourist activities due to the favorable exchange rate, quality of products and diversity of choice, the experience goes up a few notches during the three annual sale seasons in the country.

The other two sale seasons not to be missed are the Malaysia Mega Sale Carnival from 15 May to 31 July and the Malaysia Year End Sale from 1 November to 31 December this year.

To know more exciting events and promotion on Malaysia Super Sale at our local major malls, readers can log into Miss SHOPhia website (missshophia.malaysia.travel), follow her IG @miss_shoppia and do like her Facebook at www.facebook.com/missshophia.

Venue: Nationwide

Organiser: Shopping Secretariat Malaysia, Tourism Malaysia

Contact: +603 8891 8000

Fax: +603 8891 8449
Email: [email protected]
Website: missshophia.malaysia.travel

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

The Red Envelope

Chinese New Year, which will fall on 16 February 2018, is celebrated by the Chinese all over the world. It is also known as the Lunar New Year as it is based on the lunar calendar as opposed to the Gregorian calendar in Western countries. In Malaysia, the first two days of the Chinese New Year celebration are public holidays.

2018 is the year of man’s best friend, or the Year of the Dog, according to Chinese astrology. The celebration starts with the new moon on the first day of the Lunar New Year and ends on the full moon, 15 days later. The 15th day of Chinese New Year (or Chap Goh Mei) is observed with a lantern parade in Chinese communities.

The origin of this celebration dates back to early Chinese civilisation 5,000 years ago. The word Nian, which means “year” in Chinese, was originally the name of a ferocious beast that preyed on people on the eve of New Year. To scare Nian away, the people pasted red paper decorations on windows and doors, and set off firecrackers, as Nian was afraid of the colour red, the light of fire and loud noises. Therefore, at the beginning of every year, they repeat these rituals which have been passed down from generation to generation.

Legend also has it that the ancient Chinese asked a lion for help. The lion wounded Nian, but it returned a year later. This time, the lion couldn’t help as it was guarding the emperor’s gate. So, the people used bamboo and cloth to fashion an image of the lion. Two men crawled inside, pranced and roared, and frightened Nian away. This explains the Lion Dance, one of the most impressive sights during Chinese New Year.

The phrase Guo Nian, which may means, “survive the Nian”, is used to mean “Celebrate the (New) Year”. The word Guo in Chinese means “to pass”.  Today, red paper decorations and firecrackers still signify the cheerful Chinese New Year period.


CHINESE NEW YEAR CELEBRATION IN MALAYSIA

The New Year season starts early in the twelfth month of the previous year and lasts until the middle of the first month of the New Year.

In Malaysia, Chinese New Year preparations begin a month before the actual celebration, when the Chinese shop for decorations, food, drinks, new clothing, groceries and titbits. Chinese New Year songs are heard in shopping complexes which attract customers with many seasonal sales and promotions. Chinatown at Petaling Street is an ideal place to experience the excitement of the pre-festive celebration.

It is customary to spring clean the house and symbolically sweep away any trace of bad luck to make way for good luck and fortune. Some families even renovate their houses or give them a new coat of paint. After that, the houses are decorated with paper scrolls bearing verse couplets inscribed with blessings and auspicious words like happiness, longevity, and wealth.

Long before the eve of Chinese New Year, people living far away from their families make their journey home. Traffic jams build up on highways while airports, bus terminals, and train stations are normally packed.

No matter how tiring the journey may be, family members are expected to gather around the table for their Chinese New Year eve reunion dinner, the most important meal of the year. After dinner, they spend the night playing cards, watch TV programmes dedicated to the celebration, or just have a good time catching up with each other.

On the first day of Chinese New Year, ritual homage is offered to ancestors and reverence paid to the gods. New clothes are worn and younger family members greet their elders saying Kong Xi Fatt Chai (Mandarin) or Kong Hei Fatt Choi (Cantonese), meaning “congratulations and prosperity”. The ang pow, a red envelope with cash, is given by married couples to children and unmarried adults.

The seventh day of Chinese New Year is known as “everybody’s birthday”. On this day, the Chinese eat yee sang, a combination of raw fish, pickled ginger, shredded vegetables, lime and various sauces. This meal is supposed to bring prosperity and good fortune to those who eat it.

On the eighth day, the Hokkien-speaking community pray to Tee Kong, the God of Heaven at midnight. On the ninth day, numerous offerings are set out in the forecourt or central courtyard of temples to celebrate the birthday of the Jade Emperor. The 15th day is Chap Goh Mei which marks the official end of Chinese New Year.

During the Chinese New Year period, many Chinese families often receive visitors at home. Relatives and friends, regardless of their race and religion call on one another, exchanging good wishes and gifts like tangerines (called Kam in Cantonese, meaning “Gold”) and other traditional New Year delicacies.

The Chinese New Year open house, like other major celebrations in the country, is also held on a national level to enable all Malaysians and tourists to enjoy the cultural event. The Malaysian open house concept bears testimony to the fact that tolerance and mutual respect prevail in this multi-racial country.
Through the customs and traditions of Chinese New Year, the spirit of peace, good health, happiness and prosperity is engendered and spread among people.

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

HAPPY CHINESE NEW YEAR OF TH E ROOSTER

Our best Chinese New Year wishes to all our customers, suppliers and business associates in the Year of the Rooster.

May all of us stay healthy, best of health and be prosperous in the coming year.

Qong Xi Fa Cai.

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default

LOVE IS IN THE AIR

Tourists looking for love join in Malacca’s Chap Goh Meh celebration
22 FEBRUARY 2016 @ 9:56 PM
BY MICHELE NG

MALACCA: Love was in the air at the Quayside at the Malacca River as tourists mingled with locals to celebrate Chap Goh Meh.



A group of women in particular, were keen participants in the tossing of the oranges ritual, synonymous with the celebration often dubbed the ‘Chinese Valentine’s Day.’

Susanna and Carla Saradeth from Germany who were on the boat expressed their excitement at being part of the celebration for the first time.

“A friend of mine told me the meaning behind the orange tossing and said I would do it while I am here.

“At that time, I laughed it off but I never thought I would actually do it”, Susanna said with a giggle when met today.

Carla also jokingly said that they might get lucky in love after this.

Both Susanna and Carla liked the warmth that they received by the locals throughout the event.

“We were just walking by when we were invited to join and suddenly we were a part of everything.

“It was really cool and the dances and costumes were nice,” Carla said.

Those in attendance were also serenaded by a performance from the ‘Body and Soul’ band while being entertained by the catchy lagu joget by ‘The Serani Teng Teng’.

Present was state Transport and Project Rehabilitation executive committee chairman Datuk Lim Ban Hong, who officiated the event.

Chap Goh Meh is the 15th and last day of the Chinese New Year celebration.

Some of the women tossing oranges into the Malacca River at Quayside during the Chap Goh Meh celebration. Pix by HAIRUNISAH LOKMAN.

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default

QONG XI FA CAI IN THE YEAR OF THE YEAR

As the Chinese New Year of the Goat is fast approaching, the webmaster of Tourism Melaka wants to extend our best wishes to all our visitors and well wishers.

May the New Year of the Goat brings you happiness, wealth, prosperity and health to you and your family.

QONG XI FA CAI AND HAPPY NEW YEAR 2015.

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default