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LEGOLAND® Malaysia Resort Launches the World’s First LEGO® Virtual Reality Roller Coaster

Themed “The Great LEGO® Race”, the Refreshed Ride Will Immerse Families in a New Exhilarating Experience Together

  

Artist’s impression of The Great LEGO Race entrance at LEGOLAND® Malaysia Resort.

Ready, Set, LEGO®! Prepare to embark on the wildest LEGO ride as LEGOLAND® Malaysia Resort will be the world’s first LEGOLAND Park to launch the LEGO virtual reality roller coaster in November 2017, followed by LEGOLAND Florida Resort and LEGOLAND Deutschland Resort in 2018.

Combining cutting-edge virtual reality technology with roller coaster thrills, the new attraction was developed under the supervision of Merlin Magic Making – the company’s global creative division that designs and develops attractions for Merlin sites around the world. The Great LEGO Race will transform three existing “Project X” roller coasters into an exciting, high-octane experience that puts kids and parents alike in the driver’s seat and asks, “Are you brave enough to face, race and beat the best of the best in all of LEGO world?”

The Great LEGO Race was inspired by the way kids play with LEGO toys at home. It’s a unique LEGO adventure that lets kids enter an epic imaginary world made entirely from LEGO bricks, featuring a host of different themes and fun LEGO characters, all mixed up together.

Featuring a colorful lineup of racers drawn from the ranks of the popular LEGO Minifigure mystery assortments, The Great LEGO Race builds a universe of imagination that will unleash the inner child of everyone. It pits riders in a rollicking race against wild, brick-built contraptions driven by Trendsetter, Pharaoh, Surfer Girl, Wizard and Pirate Captain, including a rocket-powered surfboard and a stylish scooter fueled by espresso. Wearing VR headsets, guests will experience the action from every direction – up, down, forward, backward and all points in between – in a spectacular environment completely made of LEGO bricks.

LEGOLAND Malaysia Resort are honoured to be the first LEGOLAND Park to launch this experience in the world. This November’s launch will further testify to that commitment as guests visiting LEGOLAND Malaysia Resort will be among the first in the world to embark on The Great LEGO Race and lose themselves in a virtual world with captivating storyline suitable for adults and children alike.

Still image of LEGO® Virtual Reality Roller Coaster, The Great LEGO race

The adventure begins the moment guests approach the ride’s bold new entry portal enveloped in the sounds of roaring engines fill the air. Nearby, the coaster’s queue will resemble a pre-race space where pit crews for each of the five LEGO racers prepare for the competition, including interactive and hands-on elements to entertain riders in the queue.

During the ride, Bluetooth technology will sync the virtual visuals with the roller coaster’s twists, turns, drops and climbs, creating an all-new experience filled with thrills, spills, surprises and humor – done in LEGOLAND’s brilliance.

The Great LEGO Race can be ride with or without the VR headset, and is suitable for children ages 6 and up.

For further information on promotions and activities, visit LEGOLAND Malaysia Resort’s official website www.legoland.com.my

 

** CONTACT INFORMATION **

Chloe Chow
LEGOLAND® Malaysia Resort | Merlin Entertainments Group
Tel: +6 07 597 8816 | Mobile: +019-612 4737

[email protected]

 

 

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

Motorsport month in Malaysia

By Lloyd Green

 

  • F1 Petronas Malaysia Grand Prix
  • Shell Malaysia MotoGP

 

Buckle up and start your engines for motorsport heaven this October. With the F1 Petronas Malaysia Grand Prix and Shell Malaysia MotoGP both held at Sepang International Circuit (SIC) this month, we’ve provided a non-stop guide of what to expect at both events.

The grid coming out of the first corner at Sepang — f1destinations.com

The grid coming out of the first corner at Sepang — f1destinations.com

With an exciting cluster of events throughout the race week, including a demo run, auto carnival, fan engagement programmes with the drivers and a spectacular post-race concert, the newly redefined F1 Malaysia GP is not to be missed.

Since its entry to the F1 race calendar in 1999, the Malaysian GP has evolved into the most anticipated races of the year. Moving from it’s traditional home of March to October to form a unique Southeast Asia F1 double-header with the Singapore GP in mid-September, the Malaysian GP now holds a key role in deciding the championship.

Families looking forward to soaking up the thrills at SIC can enjoy an improved family friendly activity at the circuit with the ever popular X-track returning on popular demand, showcasing motorsports themed thrills such as drifting, rallying, go-karting, ATV rides and more, for fans of all ages.

2015 Malaysia GP winner Sebastian Vettel — www.formula1.com

2015 Malaysia GP winner Sebastian Vettel — www.formula1.com

Track:

  • The Sepang Circuit is infamous for its unpredictable weather ranging from burning hot days to full-blown tropical rainstorms which result in tough races and edge of your seat moments.
  • The track design is unique and challenging as it has seven clear straights and many narrow turns making it one of the most technical circuits on the calendar. The relatively wider track also affords drivers overtaking opportunities that are rarely seen elsewhere.

Schedule:

  • Friday, 30th Sept — Free Practice
  • Saturday, 1st Oct — Qualifying
  • Sunday, 2nd Oct — F1 Malaysia GP After-Race Concert with Usher

Race:

  • The dominance by Mercedes AMG Petronas Formula One Team has continued in 2016 with Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg dominating standings.
  • A win for either driver in Malaysia could prove vital heading into the last five races.
  • Defending Malaysian GP champion, Germany’s Sebastian Vettel will be hoping to spoil the party again.

Usher returns to Malaysia for the first time since 2010

Usher returns to Malaysia for the first time since 2010

Entertainment:

  • Multi-Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter Usher will be performing at the After-Race Concert.
  • Past performers to grace the After-Race stage at Sepang include Jamiroquai and Lenny Kravitz.
  • Raceday activities also include classic car convoy, supercar convoy and airshow.

Tickets:

  • There are various ticket packages for the F1 Malaysia GP on offer. Click Here
  • You can buy a transportation add-on that will take you to and from SIC to KL Sentral.

Great vantage point from Sepang’s iconic stands

Great vantage point from Sepang’s iconic stands

Shell Malaysia MotoGP

Held just four weeks later is the Shell Malaysia MotoGP. Fans can expect an even bigger and better event in 2016, with off-track entertainment, fan engagement with riders and other exciting activities. Tickets are selling through the roof with local interest firmly on young gun Khairul Idham Pawi who has won trice in his rookie season in the Moto3 championship. Also flying the Malaysian flag will be Adam Norrodin (Moto3) and Hafizh Syahrin (Moto2).

 Track:

  • With four slow corners following two long straights and ten medium to high-speed corners. Particularly favourable to overtaking manoeuvres and plenty of open throttle.
  • Has one of the longest laps in MotoGP and is made all the more gruelling for riders by intense heat and humidity.

Schedule:

  • Friday, 28th Oct — Moto3, Moto2, MotoGP Free Practice
  • Saturday, 29th Oct— Moto3, Moto2, MotoGP Qualifying

Sunday, 30th Oct — Moto3, Moto2, MotoGP

All eyes will by on Malaysia’s Khairul Idham Pawi — http://i-moto.com.my/

All eyes will by on Malaysia’s Khairul Idham Pawi — http://i-moto.com.my/

Tickets:

  • There are various ticket packages for the F1 Malaysia GP on offer. Click Here
  • You can buy a transportation add-on that will take you to and from SIC to KL Sentral.

Getting to Sepang International Circuit is relatively easy. It’s located about 15km from the Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA and KLIA2) and about 50km south from the Kuala Lumpur City Centre. SIC has a hotel, shopping centre and golf course. There will also be shuttle buses operating from KL Sentral to Sepang on both Sept 30 to Oct 1 and Oct 28 to Oct 30.

For more information on both events go to www.sepangcircuit.com

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

Getting around Melaka

Overview
getting-around-melaka2

As any other historical city, Malacca is very interesting, original and special. It offers delicious local cuisine, amazing attraction places and many astonishing photo shoot points. No matter how curious or eager you can be, this state will fulfill your whims. If you choose Malacca as your tourist destination you won’t be disappointed. As soon as you reached this city, don’t waste your time, just find a conveyance and explore, learn, eat, drink, have fun and feel Melaka.

Whether you are travelling alone, as a couple or in a group, the best way to get around the prime of Malacca is on foot. First of all visit Baba-Nyonya Heritage Museum and Malacca Sultanate Palace Museum. These 2 places will tell you everything about Malaccan history. It is very important to know its past. The good part about Melaka is almost 70% of the major attractions are within 1km radius. There is no better way to have a good feel about Melaka by walking. It’s also a good free way to burn calorie without too exhausted.

If you are running out of time, rent a bicycle or join a cycling tour group. Some hotels offer bicycle rental for their guests. Each corner in Malacca denotes history, but at the same time, it is a modern city. The drawback of cycling within the city area is there is limited tracks for bicycle so sharing roads with cars and buses may become a bit dangerous. Also, do take note that some attractions in the hill side like St. Paul’s Hill are not reachable in bike.

When you reached Malacca River, try to look for Muara Jetty, which is next to Quayside Heritage Centre. This is the where the river cruise journey starts. In the 45-min sightseeing tour, you’ll cruise past historic buildings, old warehouses(godowns) and graffiti art on the buildings. Melaka River Cruise is one of the best ways to see the city’s beauty. If you haven’t got enough of the river view, pick a restaurant by the river and see how the environment changes color when the sky turns dark.

An unusual transport within Melaka is a trishaw. It is a small vehicle with a pedal and three wheels. You can find them at the Dutch Square. This non-pollute vehicle driver and at the same time guide, will acquaint you with every touristic point in the city.

No doubt a car is the faster way to explore a city. For most visitors who wants to explore Melaka outside the prime city area, hail for a taxi and the driver will take you anywhere you want. If you prefer chartered taxi services, they are available at the end of Jalan Kee Ann. A taxi can carry up to 4 passengers. As most taxi drivers don’t use meter, it is best to negotiate the price before hopping in the taxi. You are being ripped off if a ride less than 5 mins is charged RM15. A personal car is the most convenient vehicle. You have everything you may need at hand, especially when you travel with kids.

Any transport vehicle you choose will help you to explore the beautiful and unique Malacca.


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2 Responses to Getting around Melaka

  1. Anne Liltved says:

    I have tried to find a bus from Malacca to Mersing on July 8, but it seems as if they are all fully booked. Could it still be a chance to find bus transport or do we need to take a taxi (family of five)?

    • Go Admin says:

      You may want to search for the bus availability at Easybook and see if you can secure the seats. If bus transport is not possible, taking a taxi is an option.


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Article source: http://www.gomelaka.my/feed/

The other side of Malaysia

By Lloyd Green

Like in any country, life away from the city is different. In rural Malaysia, village or kampung life is another beast. The Malays and Orang Asli here still practice their traditions, maintaining the old lifestyle of their people. It is completely different from the lifestyle in the city and you can see how different their life is.

To the locals it is more than just a home; it is a community where history and heritage lives on. From food, ceremonies and rituals to their connection and dependence on the land, there’s a sense of belonging — one not often found in the city.

Kampung life is sustained by agriculture; rice fields, fruit plantations, fishing and other types of farming. The family home in the kampung is well-kept and blends in with the surrounds of the village. Rambutan and rubber trees line the pathways with other types of vegetation providing shade from the harsh elements.

These shaded compounds are favourite places for school-yard games and social interaction as well as working areas. Attap and mat-weaving, drying, rice-pounding and carpentry are some of the common duties carried out. The space underneath each stilted house is also used to store food, fuel, building materials, farming equipment, bicycles and even cars.

De Visu / Shutterstock.com

Dense bushland and forest occupies the area surrounding these villages, with the echoes of children enjoying the cool waters of nearby rivers a welcome relief from the persistent horns of the city.

Our driver had turned down a narrow, sandy path past some neighbouring compounds, shacks and gardens, via the large lake that formed the focus of the kampung and towards a traditional styled home that stood resplendent between the trees. The 150-year-old structure had been given a splash of colour and was vibrant in pink and green.

We followed our guide past more wooden huts and through a muddy swamp until we found our night’s accommodation: A bamboo hut on the bank of the river, equipped with veranda and scenic views. The hospitality we received that night and in the morning was overwhelming.

Dozens of banana plantations dominate the valley. Pak Angah, a well known farmer show us his property. He sells each comb of his bananas for just over RM1. It’s enough to make around 300 ringgit per month.

the other side of malaysia 1

His children often accompany him in the picking of the bananas, as well as friends in the village. Much of the village operates this way. The husband leaves early in the morning to work on the land and the mother stays at home with the young children.

The kampung is eerily quiet during the day until the roaring engine of the school bus returns in the afternoon. Swarms of teenagers rush through the village yelling, running and laughing — their mothers often scolding at them to return home.

the other side of malaysia 2

The roads here connecting the kampungs to the highway vary in quality. At night and during rainy season they can be quite dangerous. One particular section of road we took was diabolical at best. Not only did we have to navigate the large rocks and deep ruts, but also the twenty minutes’ of torrential rain, mud and steepness.

At least the ceremony we’d attend would be worth it. A fellow traveller best describes the events that unfolded:

“The ceremony is held in an enclosed dewan, which is much like my longhouse: made of split bamboo flooring and thatched bamboo walls, with rough tree trunk beams and a grass roof. From the ceiling hang bunches of broad green leaves.”

“From the darkness, one of the men chants the first line of his prayer, weaving his words to the beat of the bamboo. The women answer his prayer, repeating the line in unison, all the while making the beautiful percussive music with the bamboo. The man chants again, the chorus of women answer. Chant, two, three, four. One, two, three, four. Answer, two, three, four. One, two, three, four. And on and on. It is intoxicating.” ~~ Joe Byrnes.

 It’s this one ceremony that best explains kampung life. The simplicity of the people and the traditions they uphold make life out here very special.

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

The other side of Malaysia



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May 19, 2016



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By Lloyd Green

Like in any country, life away from the city is different. In rural Malaysia, village or kampung life is another beast. The Malays and Orang Asli here still practice their traditions, maintaining the old lifestyle of their people. It is completely different from the lifestyle in the city and you can see how different their life is.

To the locals it is more than just a home; it is a community where history and heritage lives on. From food, ceremonies and rituals to their connection and dependence on the land, there’s a sense of belonging — one not often found in the city.

Kampung life is sustained by agriculture; rice fields, fruit plantations, fishing and other types of farming. The family home in the kampung is well-kept and blends in with the surrounds of the village. Rambutan and rubber trees line the pathways with other types of vegetation providing shade from the harsh elements.

These shaded compounds are favourite places for school-yard games and social interaction as well as working areas. Attap and mat-weaving, drying, rice-pounding and carpentry are some of the common duties carried out. The space underneath each stilted house is also used to store food, fuel, building materials, farming equipment, bicycles and even cars.

De Visu / Shutterstock.com

Dense bushland and forest occupies the area surrounding these villages, with the echoes of children enjoying the cool waters of nearby rivers a welcome relief from the persistent horns of the city.

Our driver had turned down a narrow, sandy path past some neighbouring compounds, shacks and gardens, via the large lake that formed the focus of the kampung and towards a traditional styled home that stood resplendent between the trees. The 150-year-old structure had been given a splash of colour and was vibrant in pink and green.

We followed our guide past more wooden huts and through a muddy swamp until we found our night’s accommodation: A bamboo hut on the bank of the river, equipped with veranda and scenic views. The hospitality we received that night and in the morning was overwhelming.

Dozens of banana plantations dominate the valley. Pak Angah, a well known farmer show us his property. He sells each comb of his bananas for just over RM1. It’s enough to make around 300 ringgit per month.

the other side of malaysia 1

His children often accompany him in the picking of the bananas, as well as friends in the village. Much of the village operates this way. The husband leaves early in the morning to work on the land and the mother stays at home with the young children.

The kampung is eerily quiet during the day until the roaring engine of the school bus returns in the afternoon. Swarms of teenagers rush through the village yelling, running and laughing — their mothers often scolding at them to return home.

the other side of malaysia 2

The roads here connecting the kampungs to the highway vary in quality. At night and during rainy season they can be quite dangerous. One particular section of road we took was diabolical at best. Not only did we have to navigate the large rocks and deep ruts, but also the twenty minutes’ of torrential rain, mud and steepness.

At least the ceremony we’d attend would be worth it. A fellow traveller best describes the events that unfolded:

“The ceremony is held in an enclosed dewan, which is much like my longhouse: made of split bamboo flooring and thatched bamboo walls, with rough tree trunk beams and a grass roof. From the ceiling hang bunches of broad green leaves.”

“From the darkness, one of the men chants the first line of his prayer, weaving his words to the beat of the bamboo. The women answer his prayer, repeating the line in unison, all the while making the beautiful percussive music with the bamboo. The man chants again, the chorus of women answer. Chant, two, three, four. One, two, three, four. Answer, two, three, four. One, two, three, four. And on and on. It is intoxicating.” ~~ Joe Byrnes.

 It’s this one ceremony that best explains kampung life. The simplicity of the people and the traditions they uphold make life out here very special.

About the Author