MALAYSIA WORLD HERITAGE TRAVEL SITE Rotating Header Image

food stalls

THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT PEKAN RABU

One of the most popular attractions in Alor Setar, the capital of Kedah, is its Pekan Rabu, which literally means Wednesday Market, a business complex selling every traditional stuff that Kedah is famous for. What makes Pekan Rabu more special to the Kedahans is because Malaysia’s fourth and currently seventh Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamad, born in Alor Setar, was once a trader there.

Yes, you heard it right! During the Japanese Occupation, Tun Dr. Mahathir’s studies were interrupted so he decided to return to his birthplace and become a trader at the old Pekan Rabu, selling fruits, banana fritters, coffee and handicrafts until the World War II ended.

When Tun Dr. Mahathir became a politician, he made it his personal mission to turn the traditional market into a commercial one. He made sure that the weekly market operating from an attap shack, became a multi-storey arcade selling a wide range of stuff from traditional delicacies like “dodol durian” to mengkuang mats and apparel.

The brick-and-mortar shopping complex was built on Jalan Tunku Ibrahim in 1975 and was officially opened in 1978 by Tun Dr. Mahathir himself, the then-Deputy Prime Minister. It had 347 stalls with a variety of businesses and became one of the important landmarks of Alor Setar. The Phase 2 of the shopping complex was built in 1990 and later, in 1995, the original building was renovated.

Pekan Rabu has always been a compulsory stop in Tun Dr. Mahathir’s annual Ramadan pilgrimage to Alor Setar. On his recent visit to Pekan Rabu after he became the Prime Minister for the second time, Tun Dr. Mahathir visited the stall selling the ‘Songkok Style Tun’ which has become his favourite and one he frequents regularly.

The history of Pekan Rabu actually goes as far back as World War I. A prince from the royal household of Kedah, the late Tunku Yaacob Almarhum Sultan Abdul Hamid, wanted to encourage more Malays to take an active role in commercial activities. So, in the early 1920s, he initiated a weekly market, open only on Wednesdays, along Sungai Kedah near Tanjung Chali. It became a training ground for the Malays to do business and it later evolved into a daily market when the business became prosperous. In 1932, Pekan Rabu was shifted to its present location in Jalan Tunku Ibrahim.

In 2014, Pekan Rabu was given a total makeover in an effort to make it more attractive to tourists. Even though the upgrading of the complex involved building a four-storey complex with a modern architecture, the original concept of Pekan Rabu, which made it unique, was maintained, including its traditional Islamic architecture.
The former Pekan Rabu used to have two separate buildings but the new building has everything under one roof to make shopping more comfortable for its visitors. It currently has 355 business lots, as well as 48 kiosks and 24 food stalls. There is also an exhibition area on the ground floor. It is open daily from 9 am to 9 pm.

Pekan Rabu offers a wide range of goods and services, including crockery, jewellery, textiles, traditional medicines, wedding and bridal items, local delicacies and handicrafts. For the locals, it is a complete shopping mall that fulfils all needs, while for tourists, it is glimpse into the daily lives of both traders and the local customers.

Let us throw a challenge to the would-be visitor to Pekan Rabu. Whenever you have an opportunity to visit the place, take the time to trace our Prime Minister’s favourite haunts or shops at Pekan Rabu. If you are lucky, the original traders there might share a story or two about the world’s oldest country leader, our Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Mahathir. Good luck!

Getting There

By Car or Taxi
From the North-South Expressway (PLUS), take either the Alor Setar Selatan or Alor Setar Utara exit and follow the signboard heading to Alor Setar City Centre. From there you can see the signboard showing how to get to ‘Pekan Rabu’.

By Train (ETS)
From Kuala Lumpur Sentral Station to Alor Setar, Kedah will take approximately 5 1/2hours journey by KTM ETS

Who To Contact
Koperasi Pekan Rabu Alor Setar Berhad
Tel: +604-733 5929

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

PEKAN RABU

One of the most popular attractions in Alor Setar, the capital of Kedah, is its Pekan Rabu, which literally means Wednesday Market, a business complex selling every traditional stuff that Kedah is famous for. What makes Pekan Rabu more special to the Kedahans is because Malaysia’s fourth and currently seventh Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamad, born in Alor Setar, was once a trader there.

Yes, you heard it right! During the Japanese Occupation, Tun Dr. Mahathir’s studies were interrupted so he decided to return to his birthplace and become a trader at the old Pekan Rabu, selling fruits, banana fritters, coffee and handicrafts until the World War II ended.

When Tun Dr. Mahathir became a politician, he made it his personal mission to turn the traditional market into a commercial one. He made sure that the weekly market operating from an attap shack, became a multi-storey arcade selling a wide range of stuff from traditional delicacies like “dodol durian” to mengkuang mats and apparel.

The brick-and-mortar shopping complex was built on Jalan Tunku Ibrahim in 1975 and was officially opened in 1978 by Tun Dr. Mahathir himself, the then-Deputy Prime Minister. It had 347 stalls with a variety of businesses and became one of the important landmarks of Alor Setar. The Phase 2 of the shopping complex was built in 1990 and later, in 1995, the original building was renovated.

Pekan Rabu has always been a compulsory stop in Tun Dr. Mahathir’s annual Ramadan pilgrimage to Alor Setar. On his recent visit to Pekan Rabu after he became the Prime Minister for the second time, Tun Dr. Mahathir visited the stall selling the ‘Songkok Style Tun’ which has become his favourite and one he frequents regularly.

The history of Pekan Rabu actually goes as far back as World War I. A prince from the royal household of Kedah, the late Tunku Yaacob Almarhum Sultan Abdul Hamid, wanted to encourage more Malays to take an active role in commercial activities. So, in the early 1920s, he initiated a weekly market, open only on Wednesdays, along Sungai Kedah near Tanjung Chali. It became a training ground for the Malays to do business and it later evolved into a daily market when the business became prosperous. In 1932, Pekan Rabu was shifted to its present location in Jalan Tunku Ibrahim.

In 2014, Pekan Rabu was given a total makeover in an effort to make it more attractive to tourists. Even though the upgrading of the complex involved building a four-storey complex with a modern architecture, the original concept of Pekan Rabu, which made it unique, was maintained, including its traditional Islamic architecture.
The former Pekan Rabu used to have two separate buildings but the new building has everything under one roof to make shopping more comfortable for its visitors. It currently has 355 business lots, as well as 48 kiosks and 24 food stalls. There is also an exhibition area on the ground floor. It is open daily from 9 am to 9 pm.

Pekan Rabu offers a wide range of goods and services, including crockery, jewellery, textiles, traditional medicines, wedding and bridal items, local delicacies and handicrafts. For the locals, it is a complete shopping mall that fulfils all needs, while for tourists, it is glimpse into the daily lives of both traders and the local customers.

Let us throw a challenge to the would-be visitor to Pekan Rabu. Whenever you have an opportunity to visit the place, take the time to trace our Prime Minister’s favourite haunts or shops at Pekan Rabu. If you are lucky, the original traders there might share a story or two about the world’s oldest country leader, our Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Mahathir. Good luck!

Getting There

By Car or Taxi
From the North-South Expressway (PLUS), take either the Alor Setar Selatan or Alor Setar Utara exit and follow the signboard heading to Alor Setar City Centre. From there you can see the signboard showing how to get to ‘Pekan Rabu’.

By Train (ETS)
From Kuala Lumpur Sentral Station to Alor Setar, Kedah will take approximately 5 1/2hours journey by KTM ETS

Who To Contact
Koperasi Pekan Rabu Alor Setar Berhad
Tel: +604-733 5929

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

A ROAD TRIP BACK IN TIME

A Road Trip Back in Time

Malaysia is rich with history, not only from the Dutch or British era but also from the World War II events that took place on this land. My friend and I decided that we would make a trip to revive some forgotten times. Thus, we set off on a historical road-trip that we named “2 historical states in 2 days”!

For those attempting to follow in our footsteps, rest assure that driving on Malaysian roads and highways is totally safe and enjoyable with great infrastructure and amenities along the way. Your long-distance drive can be interspersed with stops along the clean RnRs (Rest and Relax lay-bys) where there are food stalls, restrooms, convenience stores, petrol stations and Muslim prayer rooms.

The Mammoth on the Lake
From Kuala Lumpur, our first historic stop was to visit a “machine” from the British colonial era. Driving up north on the North-South PLUS Highway, we headed to Tanjung Tualang in Batu Gajah, a forgotten town that used to be famous for tin-mining activities in its heyday.

Briefly, Malaysia used to be the world’s largest tin producer, but when tin prices fell in 1980s, tin mining as an industry slowly ceased to exist in the country.

The “machine” we were going to check out is one of the last remaining pieces of Perak’s tin mining history. The Tanjung Tualang Tin Dredge No. 5 – or TT5 as it was called – stood heftily on the lake. This mammoth of a machine is Kinta Valley’s latest attraction. It was newly refurbished as a public museum to provide a glimpse into Malaysia’s tin-mining era in the old days.

Built in 1938, this surviving (but no longer in operation) bucketline tin dredge is simply a magnificent piece of engineering invention. It was originally steam-operated, but later turned fully electric in 1963.

We spent the rest of the tour with our well-informed guide, listening to how the tin dredge was operated and how the mines had changed not only the lives of people in Perak in those days, but also how the entire industry transformed and developed Malaysia.

One can explore almost all the areas of the tin dredge, touch and feel the machinery and also participate in some activities. We actually learned how to do manual tin mining – just to feel the experience of the original-time consuming method. After a “hard day’s work,” we took a sip at the lovely The Can Tin Diner, a small outlet which offers beverages and snacks.

The Original Tin Miners’ Club
We then left Batu Gajah on a 30 minute drive headed straight for Ipoh, the capital city of Perak which had its fair share of history to tell as well.

To delve deeper into Malaysia’s tin mining history, we visited Han Chin Pet Soo museum. For those who are interested to learn more about Malaysia’s tin mining history, there is no better place to do so than at this museum housed in what was once known as a private club for tin mining towkays since the 1890s. We explored three floors’ worth of old Malaya history through a guided tour and viewing unique exhibits such as a tin mine diorama, archived films, opium smoking paraphernalia, rare photographs and more.

That night, as we lulled ourselves to sleep at the Kinta Riverfront hotel in the city area, our dreams were of tin prospectors in old Malaya finding riches in the Kinta River.

Bridge to the Battlefields
The next day, we continued our journey to Penang and used the new Sultan Abdul Halim Muadzam Shah bridge to the island. This newly-built second link to the island was nearer to our ultimate destination, the Penang War Museum in Batu Maung.

It connects Bandar Cassia (Batu Kawan) in Seberang Perai on mainland Peninsular Malaysia with Batu Maung on Penang Island, and is the ideal bridge to take if you want to explore the southern parts of Penang Island.

It is the second bridge to link the island to the mainland after the first Penang Bridge. The total length of the bridge is 24 km (15 mi) with length over water at 16.9 km (10.5 mi), making it the longest bridge in Malaysia and the longest in Southeast Asia.

To abide by the Road Safety Audit, the bridge has numerous “S” shaped curves along its length. It took us about 20 minutes to cross the bridge.

Once in Batu Maung and as our car inched up the hill on which the museum stood, there was no mistaking that we were in “army territory” from the signages and war relics around.

The war bunker and fort at Batu Maung was erected by the British in the 1930s, but later came into the possession of the Japanese in 1941 when they turned it into a prisoners’ camp.

Exploring the various areas of the fort revealed many interesting relics such as pillboxes, underground shelters and bunkers dug deep into the ground. We entered a bunker that was once used as an ammunition storage area.  A bit further down, we saw a tunnel used to safely detonate bombs, big machine guns or launchers. We also saw the area where executions were carried out. A look into the barracks, now camouflaged by jungle, was a glimpse into the tormented lives and routines endured by the soldiers.

This definitely wasn’t a place for the faint-hearted, but for those who have a genuine love for history, they will find many fascinating stories and artefacts here to add depth to their knowledge of Malaysian history.

The Home of Heritage

We left the museum drenched in sweat, and the only thing to perk us up again was a comfortable warm bath in the lovely and eccentric Penaga Boutique Hotel. This cosy Baba-Nyonya inspired hotel is a cluster of 15 pre-war heritage shop houses converted into a an elegant five-star boutique accommodation full of character, right in the middle of George Town’s UNESCO heritage zone. Stepping into this Peranakan styled hotel transported us back to the origins of the Chinese and Malay cultures that fused all those years ago in Penang.

Staying the night here was a fitting way to end our history-tracing road trip as we immersed ourselves in the rich and colourful past of George Town City, whose amalgam of culture, heritage and traditions earned it a UNESCO World Heritage Site listing.

And the best thing was the location – it was just a stone’s throw away from a legendary culinary establishment for the masses – Nasi Kandar Line Clear! Although the restaurant has its franchises, nothing beats the original flavours where it first became famous.

We left Penang the very next morning pleased that we had managed to go back several decades in time to relive Malaysia’s glorious past and enjoy the fruits of its present and future.

 

Tanjung Tualang Tin Dredge No. 5 or TT5 Museum 

Address9th KM, Jalan Tanjung Tualang, 31000 Batu Gajah, Perak
Time:      9.00 am to 6.00 pm (Monday closed)
Phone:   +6014-904 3255
Fee:         From RM5 to RM20 and free for kids under 6 (Limited to 20 pax per session)

Han Chin Pet Soo Museum

Address: No. 3, Jalan Bijeh Timah (Treacher Street), 30100 Ipoh, Perak
Time: 9:30 am to 4:45 pm (Monday closed) Entry is by appointment only
Bookings: http://www.ipohworld.org/reservation/
Phone: +605 241 4541
Fee: No entrance fee, though donations of RM10 per adult and RM5 per child is welcomed

Penang War Museum

Address:  Batu Maung street, 11960 Batu Maung, Penang
Time: 9.00 am to 6.00 pm (Daily)
Plus 8.00 pm – 10.00 pm (Saturday Sunday)
Phone: +604-626 5142
Fee: From RM20 to RM35
*The museum is best reached by private transport.

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

CYCLING IN THE CITY

Question – what do Kuala Lumpur and Amsterdam now have in common? Answer – MikeBikes.

Yes, following in the tracks of the cycling city of Amsterdam, Kuala Lumpur now has a new attraction – a cycling tour of Kuala Lumpur’s heritage areas utilising the original Dutch bicycle, no less, in the famous “oranje” colour! Nothing short of exciting and thrilling, the MikeBikes Tour offers a unique insight into some of the city’s oldest and historic quarters, and the best way to go off the beaten track in an otherwise modern and cosmopolitan city!

Before we ‘cycle’ any further, let me tell you that the local council of the capital has recently introduced a dedicated blue lane especially for cyclists. The 11-kilometer long cycling-track along selected major roads in Kuala Lumpur will ensure safety for all road-users and is a thumbs up towards reducing one’s carbon footprint in the city. Cycling in the city is still a new concept in Kuala Lumpur, but it looks like we’re headed in the right direction!

To register for a MikeBikes Tour, it’s best to call ahead and book (better than walking in) the tour package of your choice. At the meeting point, you will be given the Oranje Bicycle and a security vest. Two experienced guides will be at your service throughout the cycling tour.

The meeting point is well-placed certainly. MikeBikes is located at the Malaysia Tourism Centre (MATIC) in Jalan Ampang, a stone’s throw away from KLCC. It is centrally-located and easily accessible to many places of interest in the capital.

With a group of enthusiasts, I managed to join the tour recently. MikeBikes offers two basic, highly experiential tours namely The Best of KL Classic and The KL Sunset Night Tour.

According to MikeBikes, the first tour takes you along some striking and iconic spots in the city — the Petronas Twin Towers, the fruit and vegetable market in Chow Kit and the Sin Sze Ya temple. This one starts at 8 am and ends at 12 pm.

The latter tour is about discovering the city while it is getting ready for the evening. The guys at MikeBikes painted this picture for us: The locals gather on squares and they set up their food stalls. You will be amazed at the colors and aromas of the city after sunset. Of course, the original Nasi Lemak should not be missed. The beautiful architectural buildings look different at nightfall. The KLCC Tower, Kampung Baru and the Sultan Abdul Samad Building are just a small selection of the places you will visit.

We wisely chose the evening tour (to escape the scorching sun) that would allow us to see the best of of both modern and traditional Kuala Lumpur, a kind of 2-in1 adventure. Plus, I thought it would be interesting to see the changes as the city transitioned from a bustling business centre to whatever goes on at night.

We were all geared up by 5 pm, ready and waiting eagerly at MATIC for a four-hour journey that would cover more than 14 kilometres.

We first cycled to a very special area – the untouched yet famous kampung or village in the city, Kampung Baru. Against the backdrop of KLCC, the only-surviving Malay village of wooden houses looked strangely juxtaposed against its modern surroundings. As we pedalled through back alleys and age-old heritage houses, I realised then that the village wasn’t at all backward but was a symbol of cultural identity that stood proudly against the encroaching modernisation. What makes Kampung Baru near and dear to many is its charm as a street-food institution with more than 200 stalls selling a gobsmacking array of food at affordable prices.

We later passed the Loke Mansion building and then made a brief stop in front of Masjid India at Jalan Tunku Abdul Rahman, an area famous for local shopping and a melting pot of cultures. From time to time we digested morsels of interesting information and facts about the city dished out by our experienced guides.

As the sun started to disappear beneath the skyline, we reached the Sultan Abdul Samad Building. It was quite something to admire the Moorish architecture of this iconic national building in the fading light. Special arrangements were made for us to have dinner at the historic Royal Selangor Club, once a British-only place of gathering where membership was reserved to only those in selected social circles…and here we were, quite tired, hungry and sticky, yet able to enjoy a once elitist view of the city. How ironic, yet delightful!

After dinner, we had a chance to view Masjid Jamek by night. As we were photographing this centennial place of worship sandwiched by colonial buildings, I briefly felt like I was stepping back in time to what was once the beginnings of a small riverine settlement that later turned into a modern city of wonder.

In no time, we were weaving our way through the heart of Petaling Street, where small-time vendors did thriving business. We cicyled past the Mahamariamman temple from which aromatic incense wafted and fragranced the air, and later passed by KL Forest Eco Park (formerly known as the Bukit Nanas Forest Reserve), the last remaining tropical rainforest in the city.

When I glimpsed KLCC later, I knew that our journey was about to end. Towards the end, I thought that any tourist would enjoy and be happy with this authentic experience of getting up close and personal with Kuala Lumpur through the MikeBikes’ tour programme. Driving by these same places in a car would only leave a fleeting impression, if one were any observant. But cycling through the alleyways, weaving through foot traffic, passing by age-oild buildings within touching distance, really put a sense of perspective in me. Though my legs were tired, I felt a sense of pride to witness how my Kuala Lumpur had progressed well in its beauty and harmony. What a ride!

AddressMikeBikes’ at Malaysia Tourism Centre (MaTIC), 109 Jalan Ampang, 50450 Kuala Lumpur
Web: www.mikebikes.my
Operation     Open daily. Closes 10 pm
Phone:          +6017-673 7322

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

A Spontaneous Road Trip to Pantai Klebang

An Afternoon at Klebang Beach

As part of the Unesco Heritage Sites, the ‘Historic Cities of the Straits of Melaka’ needs no introduction. Many Malaysians are repeat visitors to this fascinating site. But today my friends and I decided to explore the area outside of the historic perimeter, to be precise, its coastal area.

Over the last couple of years, Klebang Beach (or Pantai Klebang, to the locals), a 15-minute drive out of Melaka City, has become viral because of these two things – food and sand dunes. These were the main reasons we made the two-and-a-half-hour drive to Pantai Klebang all the way from Kuala Lumpur, one fine afternoon. (Note: from Kuala Lumpur, drive southwards on the North-South Highway before taking the Ayer Keroh toll exit at which you can expect to pay RM12.90).

Upon hitting Melaka, we then decided to have our lunch at this newly-opened three-star hotel called MITC Hotel in Ayer Keroh because we had heard their claypot fish head curry was to-die-for. The curry was definitely delicious coupled with ulam (local salads) and stir fried spicy clams, making for a very satisfying lunch.

With our stomachs full, we headed straight to Pantai Klebang for a little bit of exploration and to shed the calories we had just consumed. Our first stop, the Submarine Museum.

Submarine Museum

The Quessant Agosta 70 FS, with a carrying capacity of 41 passengers, was previously used to train Malaysia’s submarine crew from 2005 to 2009 following the acquisition of two submarines by the Ministry of Defence, Malaysia. Today, it has been turned into a museum, allowing visitors to go on board to experience what life is like in a sub.

I already had an idea that the inside of a submarine would be small but I didn’t realise just how narrow or cramped it would be, making me feel almost claustrophobic. The strong smell of diesel still lingered in the air at the front of the submarine where four tornadoes used to be.

My respect towards the training crew peaked after I saw how tiny the captain’s quarters was, not to mention the alley, the galley (kitchen) and the bathroom. To think that they had to spend 9,000 training hours — the equivalent of four years — underwater inside that vessel, was just beyond my belief.

My advise is to visit this museum during weekdays or at low-season. Due to the confined space within the submarine, it will be a little difficult to maneuver yourself in a crowd.

If the guide is not available, you can read about the history of FS Quessant at the information gallery provided by the museum within the compound.

The Submarine Museum is located at Dataran 1Malaysia, Klebang, Malacca. Its GPS coordinate is N 2.213988, E 102.198461 and it is open daily from 9 am to 5 pm. Visitors pay an entrance fee of RM5.00 while children below 12 are charged RM3.00.

For more information on the submarine museum,
please contact Perbadanan Muzium Melaka at +606 – 282 6526,
or visit the website at www.perzim.gov.my or facebook page at https://ms-my.facebook.com/MelakaMuseum.

Malaysian Desserts

There are three local desserts that have gone viral over the last couple of years and all of them are located at Pantai Klebang. After the visit to the museum, we drove around the Limbongan and Klebang Kecil area to search for them.

Kuih Keria Antarabangsa Hj. Jalil

Kuih keria is a Malaysian-style glazed sugar doughnut that is made from sweet potatoes. The shop that sells this kuih keria is so famous that people do not mind the long queues to get a taste of the sweet and fluffy snack, which is perfect for an afternoon tea, or any time of the day, actually.

The owner, Mr. Jalil Tompang, 74, says he uses around 150 kg of sweet potatoes per day to make about 1,000 pieces of his super delicious kuih keria. He personally prepares the ingredients and fries the doughnuts himself. Our verdict? We just couldn’t get enough of his kuih keria. Bear in mind that it is best eaten hot. One kuih keria will cost you 50 cents and the maximum you can buy is 20 pieces.

Putu Piring Generasi Ketiga

The putu piring is a traditional dessert made of ground rice flour filled at the centre with gula melaka or palm sugar, and then gently steamed in metal conical moulds. The stall selling this famous putu piring by the roadside at Kompleks Niaga Limbongan is manned by Hajah Zalika Lajis, 65, and assisted by her daughter Fazilah Mohamad, 36. According to Hajah Zalika, her mother started the business in 1969 at almost the exact same spot. The only difference is that there used to be a beach where a row of shophouses now stands behind her stall.

Now that her daughter is also involved in the business, she has named the stall as “Putu Piring Generasi Ketiga” or The Third Generation Putu Piring. What is so special about their putu piring is that the rice flour is homemade and not store-bought in packets. Yes, I can see why these pillowy puffs have such a following. At first bite, the putu piring tastes soft and moist, while the melted palm sugar oozing out tastes caramelly delicious.

The putu piring here comes in original, durian and chocolate flavours. Each is presented with a sprinkling of freshly grated coconut tinged with some salt on the side, served on a square of banana leaf, which naturally fragrances the dessert. The original flavour is priced at RM3 for five pieces while the other two flavours are priced at RM4 for five pieces.

Klebang Original Coconut Shakes

We must thank Mr. Shafie Ahmad, 55, from Klebang Kecil because, if not for his ingenuity, we would never have guessed that coconuts and vanilla ice cream go really well together! He created this coconut shake about 10 years ago by blending the white coconut flesh with sugar syrup, ice cubes and vanilla ice cream and topped it off with another scoop of vanilla ice cream. The coconut shake has now become a must-try whenever one makes a visit to Melaka.

It was late afternoon when we reached his restaurant and from the crowd gathering there, it looked like Mr. Shafie’s coconut shakes were very popular among locals and tourists alike. Various food and traditional kuih (desserts) at the restaurant are provided by the locals as he only sells coconut shakes. The restaurant operates from 11 am until 6.30 pm every day. He still maintains his old stall by the roadside for those wanting to buy a take-away coconut shake. Our verdict was the coconut shakes tasted yummy and creamy, perfect for such a hot and humid weather. Expect to pay RM3.50 per shake.

Pantai Klebang Beachfront

We decided to enjoy our desserts at the beach while waiting for the sun to set. By evening, Pantai Klebang is full of activity, filled with people playing kites, kids blowing and chasing bubbles, as well as horses carrying people back and forth. There were many food stalls there, too. Unlike other beaches, it is not advisable to swim at Pantai Klebang, but it was still an ideal place for a family picnic, though.

Pantai Klebang Sand Dunes

Here was the tricky part of the trip. The sand dunes at Pantai Klebang had gone viral for several years now but it was one of those off-the-beaten path attractions that required some navigational skills to find. Still, it attracts photographers, be it amateur or professional, who claim that this place is perfect for outdoor wedding and high fashion photography shoots.

Be prepared to walk several kilometres in or about 20 minutes on sandy terrain to reach the sand dunes. The scenery is worth every difficult step, though, especially when the sun started going down into the horizon, painting the sky with a myriad of colours from yellow to orange to red and purple before going totally dark. The changing colours of the sky also transformed the colours of the sand dunes making it look like we were on another planet. This place is definitely Instagram-worthy and has potential as a film location for movies. It has also become an increasingly popular destination for sandboarding, which is another type of high adrenaline sport.

In reality, the hills of sands which was a result of a land reclamation project in the Klebang area was a perfect mimic of the desert. It is located between Pantai Klebang Melaka and the Submarine Museum. However, there is no signboard and you have to enter at your own risk.

While you are in Pantai Klebang, why don’t you give it a try. I promise that it is one of the best places to see the sun set. And I’ll bet that it is also the best place to do a little stargazing, but only if you dare to stay at the place after dark.

After that long walk and all the climbing that we did at the sand dunes, it was time to get back the energy by having an authentic Peranakan (Nyonya) dish at the Seafarer Restaurant nearby. The food here is a fusion of seafood and Nonya-style cooking, with a hint of Chinese and Malay culinary influences. We had a nyonya-style asam pedas fish (fish cooked in a gravy of chillies and tamarind broth, thus it is both spicy and sour), sambal beancurds and hot plate tofu with white rice for dinner. Everything was delicious and combined with the restaurant’s ambience, it was a must-try restaurant. We actually took our dinner al-fresco by the beach, which was why this restaurant was so cool. It was lively and gave you that “live by the beach” vibe.

All in all, it was a well-spent day with friends at Pantai Klebang.

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/