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5 reasons to visit Pangkor Island

By Aura Farrando Image: Pulau Pangkor and its many islands

By Aura Farrando
Image: Pulau Pangkor and its many islands

Searching for that perfect weekend getaway? Perhaps something a little quieter than tourist hotspots like Langkawi and Perhentians? Look no further than Pangkor Island, located off the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia in the state of Perak, just 90km from Ipoh. It has everything you want for an island escape — and so much more — with sleepy fishing villages, relaxed atmosphere and amazing views. Here’s our Top 5 for Pangkor Island.

 

  1. Perfect Location

Unlike other beach destinations in Malaysia, Pangkor Island is quite easy to get to. You can drive or catch a bus from Kuala Lumpur to the ferry port at Lumut. The ferry from Lumut to Pangkor take 35 minutes and operates 7am to 8.30pm daily. Pangkor also has an airport, with Berjaya Air flying there three times a week. Once on the island, the best mode of transport is by scooter. Renting a scooter is relatively cheap, and will allow to you to cover most within 15 to 20 minutes. Alternatively, you can hail one of the island’s famed pink taxis.

Image: Pangkor’s famous pink taxis. — http://www.pangkorislandhomestay.com

Image: Pangkor’s famous pink taxis. — http://www.pangkorislandhomestay.com

2. Beaches and water sports

 Pangkor is just 8 square kilometres, but you’ll be surprised how much you can do, and what you can see. Of course, sun baking on the beach is the most popular pastime for visitors, with Nipah and Coral beach often dotted with holiday makers. There are also two small islands nearby — Giam and Mentagor — that are perfect for snorkelling with an array of coral, sea cucumbers and other sea life to be found. If you’re more adventurous, grab a kayak and circumnavigate the islands. Pasir Bogak is another famous beach, just 2km from Pangkor Town and it is the best place for jet skiing and parasailing.

Image: Snorkelling in Pangkor

Image: Snorkelling in Pangkor

  1. Food

With a thriving local fishing scene, it’s no coincidence that the choice of seafood is amazing. The main catch is cuttlefish and anchovies. Selling dried fish is still an important part of the economy, with locals often transporting large bags of dried anchovies from the port, to the mainland and to the markets. You’ll most likely experience a taste of these anchovies at breakfast with your nasi lemak. At evening, head to the many beachside restaurants and order ikan bakar or grilled fish. What more could you want to end your day. Oh, and it’s cheap, too.

 

  1. Explore by foot

If, for some reason, you are allergic to the ocean, there’s also plenty to do on land. There’s an uphill trek across the island with great vantage points of the local wildlife, particularly the hornbill. You can even feed these gracious birds every day at 6.30pm at Sunset View Chalet. Its owner Nordin Bakar has been feeding the island’s population of hornbills for the past 12 years. For nature lovers and hikers, also check out the jungle trails at Teluk Segadas Hill and Titi Ganung.

 

Pangkor Island has some must-see historical landmarks, too. The island has always been a trading enclave in the state of Perak. The vestiges of history can be traced in the Dutch Fort built in the 17th century. The reason behind its construction was to monopolise the tin trade in Perak and protect the Perak Chieftan.

Image: Hornbills rule the island

Image: Hornbills rule the island

  1. Relax and indulge

Pangkor Laut provides the ultimate luxurious experience. This private island is next to the bigger and busier Pangkor Island. The resort includes 140 villas and suites and has 300 acres of rainforest as a playground. If you feel like splurging, you can stay in the huge Pavarotti Suite. The tenor sang at the launch of the resort in 1994 and said the island was “paradise”. Other celebrities who have stayed here include Michael Schumacher, Eric Cantona and Michelle Yeoh. The resort will also organise your transport to and from the island. More information: http://www.pangkorlautresort.com/

Image: Paradise, Pangkor Laut Resort

Image: Paradise, Pangkor Laut Resort

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

My Malaysia

By Lloyd Green

I sit here on the plane leaving Malaysia after eight months. An experience quite unlike any I have ever encountered. Malaysia is a country where the more you invest, the more you get out of it. You could be forgiven for thinking Malaysia is embodied by KL’s global reputation — its bright lights, shopping malls, bustling nightlife and iconic Petronas Twin Towers showcasing an opulence craved by many tourists — as well as pristine island getaways such as Langkawi and the Perhentian Islands.

But if you have ever had the chance to peer beyond its veneer, you will find a land of great beauty and a population eager to share it with you. This is where the real Malaysia lies and a world in which I’ve had the privilege to step into. You’ll enter one world and exit another taking with you snippets of many cultures that will not only shape your memories but also your relationships.

My Msia 1

The view from one of the more secluded areas at Genting Highlands

Much of my adventure here is owed to the great local friends I have made. They have afforded me an authentic experience not often chronicled in your local tour guides: Guest at an Indian wedding in Klang; life as a local at Orang Asli kampungs in the jungle near Gua Musang and Raub; a road trip to Pangkor; KL’s burgeoning comedy scene; a guided tour of the famed Kacang Putih industry in Ipoh; hiking around the intriguing Genting Highlands; celebrating Deepavali with Indian families in Klang; KL’s underground punk rock scene; teaching English in remote and rural communities; celebrating Christmas in the Portuguese Settlement in Malacca; adventures to Peninsular Malaysia’s most stunning waterfalls and hikes including Chilling Falls and Gunang Tahan; picking rambutans and bananas at plantations in the jungle; witnessing Iban tribal ceremonies in Sarawak; staying on a boat house in the Royal Belum National Park as well as tasting local delicacies such as the best fish noodle soup in Petaling Jaya and homemade Indian curries in Brickfields and Klang.

My Msia 2

You can hire a boat house and enjoy the tranquil Royal Belum National Park
(Pic http://belum.com.my/tour/2d-1n-houseboat-lake-temenggor/)

That’s not to say Malaysia’s main attractions are unworthy of your presence — the tourist trail in Malaysia is reliable and growing stronger all the time. In the economic hub of Kuala Lumpur, flavours and colour of India, China and Malay locals float inconspicuously, adding great contrast and history to this modern megacity with landmarks such as Batu Caves, Bukit Bintang and KLCC ensuring thousands continue to flock there.

Venture north to George Town in Penang and Ipoh for a romantic cocktail of art, architecture and colonial influences with night markets, Chinese hawker stalls in Batu Ferringhi, the original Old Town White Coffee in Ipoh and the emergence of urban street art in both places giving reason for tourism to thrive.

The chance to live and look after Orangutans as well as the quest of climbing Malaysia’s highest peak — Mount Kinabalu — will always ensure people go to Sabah and the magic of the Rainforest World Music Festival is a beacon for Sarawak tourism each year. And of course if island hopping and diving is your thing, then you’ll fall in love with places such as Sipadan, Mabul, Kapalai, Layang Layang and Lankayan.

Malaysia has no doubt won a special place in my heart and I urge other travellers, tourists and expatriates to immerse yourself in the culture and let Malaysia sweep you off your feet. You will never regret it.

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Char Kway Teow

Char Kway Teow

‘Char Kway Teow’ or ‘stir-fried ricecake strips’ is arguably one of a many renouned dishes among Malaysians of all races. The name is subsequent from a Hokkien tenure for ‘fried’ that is ‘char, while ‘kway teow’ refers to a ‘flat rice noodles’, that is a categorical ingredient. The latter is stir-fried over really high feverishness with light or dim soy sauce, chili, while prawns, deshelled cockles, bean sprouts, chinese chives and eggs. Among a chinese community, a burn kway teow is traditionally stir-fried in pig fat with frail croutons of pig lard and offer on a square of banana root or plate. In some instances, slices of chinese sausage and fishcake are combined to intensify a taste.

Originally recognised as a bad man’s food, mostly consumed by laborers, farmers, fishermen and cockle-pickers, a plate has currently developed into one of a most-loved dishes among Malaysians – though with certain mixture wanting to belong to ‘halal’ discipline of muslim community. As a plate became some-more widespread, many cooks have come adult with their possess versions of ‘char kway teow’ though with a same essential mixture ‘Char kway teow’ was pronounced to have a origins in S.E.Asia (Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia and Brunei) though a common accord is that ‘Penang burn kway teow’ tops a list when it comes to ambience and originality. In Kampar, Perak, a plate is baked with cockles though no prawns, unless on request. In East Malaysia, other mixture are used in a cooking eg beef, onions, honeyed soya salsa etc. There are also supposed ‘gourmet versions’ of burn kway teow, generally in Ipoh, Penang, Taiping and even a Klang Valley, where seafood, crab beef and even steep eggs are combined to fit perceptive tastes.

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Muzium Gopeng, birthright haven

Life during a spin of a 20th century in Malaya is flashy in Muzium Gopeng, an ancestral home that has been lovingly easy and thrown open to a public.

With a story travelling some-more than 150 years, Gopeng is comparison than both Ipoh and Kuala Lumpur. Tin mining and rubber plantations were a dual activities that led to a founding, anchored by a British association Osbourne Chappell.

Eu Yan Sang, a Asian personality in normal Chinese medicine products was founded in Gopeng to offer health caring services to a hoards of migrant workers afterwards settling in a town.

Gopeng Museum

The opening to a Heritage House annexe of a Muzium Gopeng.

Even Dr Sun Yat Sen, insubordinate personality of a anti-communist transformation in China visited Gopeng frequently between 1909 and 1911. It was a moneyed village formed around abounding healthy resources.

However, in a 1980s, a decrease in tin-mining led to an exodus, ensuing in a arrange of stasis in terms of development, both informative and economic.

The opening of a North-South Expressway in 1994 serve eroded through-traffic, as commuters began bypassing Gopeng on their journeys adult and down a peninsula. This led to Gopeng being left in a form of time capsule.

Muzium Gopeng

View of a kopitiam set adult during a back of a house.

Focal point

On Apr 18, 2009, a Muzium Gopeng non-stop in and with World Heritage Day and stays functioning as a focal indicate for visitors to a city now. Bernard Yaw, a Gopeng native, returned from operative abroad and, following his mother’s deathbed request, bought his ancestral home from a Eu family and began restoration works to revive a shophouse to a habitable state.

Following discussions with friends and classmates, it was motionless to make a belligerent building into a Muzium Gopeng, while withdrawal a initial building as private accommodation for a Yaw family. Exhibits were donated by a internal village and others from a region.

Gopeng Museum

The aged stables opposite a travel from Muzium Gopeng is where a distinguished Eu Yan Sang family used to keep their horses.

Initial impressions might be of bric-a-brac from your internal antiques store, though closer investigation reveals a splendidly heterogeneous collection of equipment such as radios, clocks, posters and photographs, domicile equipment that snippet a story of Gopeng, a state, and indeed, a republic as a whole.

Furthermore, information on a orang asli of a segment is accessible and presented clearly. Yaw serves as a museum’s stream chairman.

On World Heritage Day 2011, a Heritage House was non-stop after a year of formulation and construction.

Gopeng Museum

Old travel signs on arrangement along with fishing outfit during a Muzium Gopeng.

Intended as an annexe to a Muzium Gopeng, a Heritage House was easy regulating normal construction techniques, generally where masonry and carpentry were concerned. The outcome is a vital image into a past.

On a belligerent floor, there is a coiffeur shop, kopitiam and a feng shui atmosphere good filled with bonsai trees and corpse from a nearby past. Up above, vital areas have been flashy and filled with precious decorations and furnishings that accurately simulate what life would have been like for a middle-class family during a spin of a 20th century in Gopeng, and indeed a surrounding areas.

These projects and their success in Gopeng reflects a intensity for furthering birthright refuge efforts in this country.

Muzium Gopeng

Antique clocks are displayed via a museum, many prominently right above a categorical entrance.

It is with a appearance and beginning of sensitive people that such realisations are possible. Charity, they say, starts during home, and in this case, someone has non-stop adult his home to a open so that we might share and learn, and keep memories of the common past alive.

Muzium Gopeng is located during No. 28, Jalan Eu Kong, Gopeng, Perak. Admission is giveaway though a concession would be appreciated. For serve sum and opening times, call Chew Wan during 017-597 1363 or Phang Sek Hong during 016-542 1287. Follow Muzium Gopeng on Twitter.


Map: Muzium Gopeng


Video: Muzium Gopeng


Gopeng Museum exhibit, Perak

Old mining city honoured

Jalan Gopeng, Kampar, Perak

Bright destiny for Kampar

Malacca

Museums in Malaysia

The Grand Kampar Hotel in Bandar Baru Kampar, Perak

Kampar has come far

Leaf bug, Gopeng Rainforest

The fascinated rainforest

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Travel: Pangkor Island, Perak

Pulau
Pangkor is an island off the coast of Perak in north-west peninsular Malaysia,
reached by ferry from Lumut (a small coastal town that links to Ipoh, or from
Sitiawan). It has a land area of only 8 square kilometers, and a population of
approximately 25,000 islanders. It is heavily promoted as a low-key tourist
destination by the Malaysian government, but fishing and fish products remain
major industries.

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