MALAYSIA WORLD HERITAGE TRAVEL SITE Rotating Header Image

Kenta Kojima

Visiting Sarawak As A Japanese Intern | All Time Favorites Local Food

Visiting Sarawak As A Japanese Intern | All Time Favorites Local Food

Throughout my stay as an intern in Sarawak, I have enjoyed various Local dishes.  Here are some of my all time favorites!

Manok Pansoh – Bamboo chicken

This is one of the famous traditional dish, it is well known to all ethnic groups in Sarawak. “Manok” means chicken in the Iban language, while “Pansoh” means something cooked in bamboo.  What is so special about this dish? Well, besides the delighting aroma the bamboo releases from the heat, the bamboo also gives the chicken is soft and tender texture.  This dish is usually eaten with plain rice.

Ayamはチキン、Pansohは竹の中で調理をすることを意味しています!イバン民族が伝統とするこの調理方法は、サラワク州の方々には大人気!竹の中で焼くことによって、ショウガやニンニクの香りがひきたち、食感も柔らかくなります!ビールとの相性も抜群です!!

japanese-intern-ayam-pansoh

Kolo Mee

Kolo Mee is a well-known dish for its simplicity and relatively cheap pricing. Each dish would cost around 3-5RM depending on the extra topping of prawn and fish. Kolo-Mee consists of BBQ pork, minced pork, fish balls, and a sprinkle of garlic on top. The mixture of chili vinegar sauce and the boiled noodle gives an addictive flavor into the dish. The dish can be considered as an all-time favorite for locals in and can be seen in every corner of Sarawak, especially in Kuching.

チャーシューやそぼろが入っており、この料理は何といっても日本人の口には絶対に合う料理だと思います。 中華の文化的影響を受けた料理でお箸と蓮華を使って食べるのが一般的です。

japanese-intern-kolo-mee

Sarawak Laksa

A must try for visitors to Sarawak. Sarawak Laksa normally uses beehoon noodles and the a shrimp based soup with more than 30 spices being involved. Sounds spicy? Well don’t worry because the soup is thickened with coconut milk mellowing the spiciness of each bite. It is recommended for breakfast.

For additional spices, if it is too spicy, use the lime to ease up the spice. If not spicy enough then add the spice paste for the tingle on your tongue.

サラワクといえばこの料理、サラワク・ラクサです!ラクサ自体は何種類もあり、地域によって味が異なりますが、サラワク・ラクサはサラワク州でしか食べられない絶品グルメです!
スパイシーなココナッツミルクベースのスープが癖になって何杯でも食べられます!
値段はなんと4-5RM (120-150円)!
ローカルフードの中でも大人気の一品です!

japanese-intern-laksa

Midin

Midin is a type of jungle ferns that can be found in tropical jungles like Sarawak.  Midin is a familiar vegetable dish served in restaurants here.  It is usually stir-fried with shrimp paste, garlic or anchovies for an astonishing taste.  A great side-dish that can compliment other dishes, most commonly with seafood.

マレーシアではよく見かけるこの野菜はミディンという名物です!見た目はワラビのようなのですが、柔らかく粘りのある日本ではあまり経験のできないような食感です!

サラワクでしか取れない山菜の一種でオイスターソースやガーリックなど調理方法は様々です!

japanese-intern-midin8

Kek Lapis

Kek Lapis, also known as Kueh Lapis is a light, layered cake available in various flavors.  This traditional cake can be seen in religious or cultural celebrations along with other local food. Outside of celebration days, it is commonly served during coffee breaks and tea times.

マレー語でKekはケーキのこと、Lapisとは層のことです。インドネシア発祥のこのレイヤーケーキはカステラとバームクーヘンを合わせたようなデザートです!

生地が何層にも重なっていることでレイヤーケーキと呼ばれています!サラワク州ではコーヒーと一緒に食べる大人気スイーツ!

値段はひとつ10RMほどです!是非、豊富なフレーバーを是非楽しんでください!

Written by: Kenta Kojima

japanese-intern-kek-lapis

Share

Article source: http://sarawaktourism.com/blog/feed/

Visiting Sarawak as a Japanese Intern | All time favorites Local Food

Throughout my stay as an intern in Sarawak, I have enjoyed various Local dishes.  Here are some of my all time favorites!

Manok Pansoh – Bamboo chicken

Ayam PansohThis is one of the famous traditional dish, it is well known to all ethnic groups in Sarawak. “Manok” means chicken in the Iban language, while “Pansoh” means something cooked in bamboo.  What is so special about this dish? Well, besides the delighting aroma the bamboo releases from the heat, the bamboo also gives the chicken is soft and tender texture.  This dish is usually eaten with plain rice.

Ayamはチキン、Pansohは竹の中で調理をすることを意味しています!イバン民族が伝統とするこの調理方法は、サラワク州の方々には大人気!竹の中で焼くことによって、ショウガやニンニクの香りがひきたち、食感も柔らかくなります!ビールとの相性も抜群です!!

Kolo Mee

Kolo MeeKolo Mee is a well-known dish for its simplicity and relatively cheap pricing. Each dish would cost around 3-5RM depending on the extra topping of prawn and fish. Kolo-Mee consists of BBQ pork, minced pork, fish balls, and a sprinkle of garlic on top. The mixture of chili vinegar sauce and the boiled noodle gives an addictive flavor into the dish. The dish can be considered as an all-time favorite for locals in and can be seen in every corner of Sarawak, especially in Kuching.

チャーシューやそぼろが入っており、この料理は何といっても日本人の口には絶対に合う料理だと思います。 中華の文化的影響を受けた料理でお箸と蓮華を使って食べるのが一般的です。

Sarawak Laksa

Laksa SarawakA must try for visitors to Sarawak. Sarawak Laksa normally uses beehoon noodles and the a shrimp based soup with more than 30 spices being involved. Sounds spicy? Well don’t worry because the soup is thickened with coconut milk mellowing the spiciness of each bite. It is recommended for breakfast.

For additional spices, if it is too spicy, use the lime to ease up the spice. If not spicy enough then add the spice paste for the tingle on your tongue.

サラワクといえばこの料理、サラワク・ラクサです!ラクサ自体は何種類もあり、地域によって味が異なりますが、サラワク・ラクサはサラワク州でしか食べられない絶品グルメです!
スパイシーなココナッツミルクベースのスープが癖になって何杯でも食べられます!
値段はなんと4-5RM (120-150円)!
ローカルフードの中でも大人気の一品です!

Midin

MidinMidin is a type of jungle ferns that can be found in tropical jungles like Sarawak.  Midin is a familiar vegetable dish served in restaurants here.  It is usually stir-fried with shrimp paste, garlic or anchovies for an astonishing taste.  A great side-dish that can compliment other dishes, most commonly with seafood.

マレーシアではよく見かけるこの野菜はミディンという名物です!見た目はワラビのようなのですが、柔らかく粘りのある日本ではあまり経験のできないような食感です!

サラワクでしか取れない山菜の一種でオイスターソースやガーリックなど調理方法は様々です!

Kek Lapis

Kek LapisKek Lapis, also known as Kueh Lapis is a light, layered cake available in various flavors.  This traditional cake can be seen in religious or cultural celebrations along with other local food. Outside of celebration days, it is commonly served during coffee breaks and tea times.

マレー語でKekはケーキのこと、Lapisとは層のことです。インドネシア発祥のこのレイヤーケーキはカステラとバームクーヘンを合わせたようなデザートです!

生地が何層にも重なっていることでレイヤーケーキと呼ばれています!サラワク州ではコーヒーと一緒に食べる大人気スイーツ!

値段はひとつ10RMほどです!是非、豊富なフレーバーを是非楽しんでください!

Written by: Kenta Kojima

Article source: http://sarawaktourism.com/blog/feed/

Visiting Sarawak as a Japanese Intern | Banana Cheese

Most may know Sarawak as a city with fascinating rainforest and the famous Rainforest World Music Festival.  Today, I would like to introduce you to the food in Sarawak that can be as fascinating as the beautiful adventurous rainforests. Gourmets being served in Sarawak come from 4 different cultures such as Chinese, Indian, Malay, and local Dayak tribes. This cultural diversity of food brings food lovers into a whole new world.

Today, I would like to share the food I learned to love where in Sarawak!

Japanese intern on food Banana Cheese3Sarawak being tropical in nature, many types of exotic fruits can be seen all over the place. Within these tropical fruits, I would like to start off my introduction with one of the most common fruits in Sarawak, “Banana”. Most of you guys might think “Bananas? I can just grab them from the Super Market anytime I want!” Well, the bananas I am going to introduce to you guys are different from the typical yellow bananas you buy at the store. In Malaysia, Bananas being easily available and growing all season, it is considered to be a fruit that can be bought at a very cheap price with high demand.

There are more than 10 types of bananas growing in Malaysia, all having distinctive features. For example, one could be small and round like the “Pisang Montel”, while others having a long skinny feature.

With the high demand and availability of Bananas, there are many dishes being served with Bananas as the main ingredient. Here’s my favorite dish that I recommend to you guys…

Pisang Goreng (Banana Fritters) with cheese

Here’s how I encountered this delicious dish:

Japanese intern on food Banana Cheese2It was another hot day in Malaysia, and me and the other interns decided to explore Sarawak. We decided to go to a populated area at first, so we took a taxi and ended up near one of the biggest food courts we been to. It was lunchtime and I decided to try something new since I wanted the day to be adventurous. I walked around the food court looking for something new but couldn’t find anything that excite my desire since the place was mostly aimed for tourists. After a few trips around the food court, there was a street stall on the other side of the street.  That’s where I found the Banana Cheese Fritters.

Crossing the street with curiosity, I noticed that the stall was taken over by Bananas. After a while, a guy came up to me asking to buy fried Bananas w/cheese. At this time, I thought to myself “Fried Bananas with cheese on top? I thought fruits were supposed to be refreshing”. But looking at the RM3 sign and the amount of fried bananas in a single plate, I couldn’t refuse the offer.  I paid for the Banana Fritters and waited for it at the table we found near the stall.

A moment later, the cashier came with a plate with a fascinating smell that provoked my stomach with hunger. It was like that smell of freshly baked bread in the morning.  The cheese topping melting from the heat of the fried bananas covered by the choice of my favorite flavor unleashed the hunger out of me. (Flavor varying from original, chocolate, caramel, cinnamon, etc.) After taking a picture, I took my first bite into the dish. I loved it. It was one of the best sweet snacks that I’ve tried in my life. The outside crisp mixed with the sweetness of the banana and the sugar is such a great mixture.  The time I remembered to take a photo of myself eating it, the plate was cleaned up leaving nothing but the caramel saucing that had fallen from the bananas.

If you ever plan on visiting Sarawak, this is a must try snack that will fulfill your taste buds.

サラワク州は、手つかずの熱帯雨林や神秘的な動植物が生息している事で知られています。夏には、Rainforest World Music Festivalなども開催されています。本日みなさんに紹介するのは、サラワク州のもう一つの魅力である「食」です。マレーシアには、数多くの食文化が存在し、一国にいながら刺激的な経験をする事ができます。

サラワク州は常夏で熱帯地域のため、果物が育ちやすく一年を通して、日本では見る事のない果実も安く、いつでも食べる事ができます。この中でも僕が一番気に入ったのがバナナです!バナナといっても、日本のコンビニやスーパーなどで手に入るものだけでなく、日本ではあまり見かけないような色や大きさのものもあります!マレーシアでは、フルーツとしてバナナを食べるだけではなく、バナナを使った料理もたくさんあります。

今から紹介する一品は、マレーシア人が愛するトッピングのチーズが決め手のピサンゴレン・チーズです!

ピサンとはマレー語で「バナナ」の事を意味し、「ゴレン」は揚げるという意味です。ピサンゴレンは場所によって列ができるお店もあり、おやつとして大人気な一品です!バナナに衣をつけて揚げているのですが、使われているバナナも通常のバナナではありません。通常のバナナを揚げようとすると柔らかくなりすぎてしまうのですが、ピサンゴレンには固めのバナナを使います。

揚げたてのピサンゴレンのカリカリ感とホクホクしたバナナの食感が、やみつきになります!揚げたてのピサンゴレンの上にチーズをトッピングし、その上にまたキャラメル、チョコレート、オリジナルソースなどの甘いソースをかけたら、また違った味を楽しむ事もできます。

ピサンゴレン・チーズは場所により異なりますが、およそ5−6RM(150-180円)ほどで購入できます。バナナ料理の中でも人気のものなのでマレーシアにお越しの際は是非お試しください!

Written by: Kenta Kojima

Article source: http://sarawaktourism.com/blog/feed/

Visiting Sarawak as a Japanese Intern | Food Adventure

I am a 21-year-old Japanese student visiting Sarawak, Malaysia, for the first time in my life. A beautiful state filled with optimistic/respectful residents and full of nature. I have spent half of my life in the U.S. and never experienced life in Asia outside of my home country, Japan. Even though Malaysia and Japan are in the same region, the experiences are very different within the two countries, which makes it crucial for first timers visiting the country. However, growing accustomed to the life in Malaysia, I have encountered many wonderful people that are making my stay in Malaysia a wonderful experience. Here are some of the tips I have for foreigners coming to Malaysia for the first time.

Tip 1: One way of greeting in Sarawak/Malaysia is “Sudah Makan?”

In Malaysia, the most common/popular way of residents greeting each other is by asking “Sudah Makan?”. At first, I thought this meant, “How are you?”, or something similar to that. Finding out what it meant, I was surprised because greeting someone by asking them if they have eaten was really unusual for me. However, after a while, I started noticing that in Malaysia, food culture is a key of communication and is one of the main reasons why people in Malaysia have the ability to become friends with each other in an instant.Japanese intern on food1

Tip 2: More than 3 meals per day?!Japanese intern on food2

Throughout my life, breakfast, lunch and dinner has been the main meal in a day. However, in Malaysia, it is not unusual for a person to eat around 5 meals per day including brunch and teatime. In my opinion, the reason for this is that the food courts and café are open from morning until midnight for people to enjoy the gourmets being served. Also, with the proportions being served per plate being small in quantity, it is likely for one to eat more than the 3 main meals.

Tip 3: Enjoying the System and Food

One thing I enjoy and respect about Malaysia is that the word “trust” can be seen anywhere and everybody being laid back about everything. Some food courts have systems that foreigners will never understand, where you take the food without the price being on display. In this case, you pay the cashier and the cashier will name a price (usually being cheaper than expected). Other times, you end up paying for the food you ate after you’ve already ate the meal. In this case, you have to inform the cashier what food you ate even though you have an empty plate in your hands. When I went through this experience, I was very shocked by the way the cashier trusted me with the payment. With a smile on my face, I left the food court with respect towards the culture.

Japanese intern on food3

Tip 4: Take out

In Malaysia, take-outs are available for any kind of food on display. One of the take out menus that might seem rare for a Japanese intern like me was the Laksa. Whenever you’re ordering take-outs for noodles, they tend to separate the noodle and the soup in two different bags. What was surprising for me was that bags for take-outs were more common than cups. Who knew bags were actually more convenient and stable than using cups!

Tip 5: Food Courts

When walking in the streets of Kuching, you tend to encounter food courts/Café at every block. The way you order food over here was extraordinary that it felt like I was a kid going out on his first shopping trip by himself.

Here’s what happened at the food court on my first trip…I stood by the buffet counter not knowing how to order so I observed the other customers and noticed that everything was self-service. The only problem was that I had no idea of the food that was on display so I ended up getting the same thing that the customer in front of me was getting resulting in a plate filled with mystery and concern. When I was about to reach for my wallet, the customer before me left without paying and sat down on the table. I didn’t know what to do so I stood at the spot looking like a lost child for about five minutes. Thankfully, one of the locals was able to speak English and told me to pay at the table.

For me, this was so unusual that this experience became one of the most memorable experiences during my visit in Malaysia.

So…for the first timers coming from Japan or any other country, I advise you to search up how the system works beforehand when visiting a food court. Otherwise, English is another option since most of the residents can communicate with the language, but there are some food courts where Malay or Chinese is being used.

Tip 6: Until your body gets used to the food/spices, don’t be too adventurous despite the curiosity.

When visiting other countries with different food culture, we are filled with curiosity and try out things we don’t have in our country. I mean, you only live once so why not right? Being born in Japan and spending half of my life in America, I thought I could eat anything without being sick. However, in my case, this was my downfall. My first week being here, I was so hyped up about the cheap meals that I probably ate everything that my body desired. Honestly, I was satisfied and had no regrets about the meals, until a huge stomachache hit me so hard which lasted me about two weeks. After some searching, I learned that some of the spices and ingredients here need some getting used to for a foreigner’s digestive system.

With this experience, my advice is to be careful with what you put in your mouth. Its good to be adventurous because it usually leads to finding delicious gourmets of Sarawak, however, supplements and medicine can become your best friend when doing so.

Japanese intern on food4

僕は日本の大学に在学中の21歳で、マレーシアのサラワク州にインターン生として滞在しています!サラワク州は自然に囲まれていて、現地のみなさんもとても温かい人たちばかりです。11年間をアメリカで過ごし、日本以外のアジア地域で生活するのが初めてなので、こちらの生活はチャレンジと新しい発見の毎日です!このブログでは、食についてのカルチャーショックや気づきを書かしてもらいます!

毎日職場に着くと、スタッフとの会話には「Sudah Makan?」と聞かれます。マレー語が苦手な僕は、着いた当初は、「元気ですか?」のような意味合いをもつ挨拶だと思っていました。後から調べてみるとこれは、「ご飯食べた?」という意味だと言う事がわかりました。日本やアメリカではこのような挨拶の仕方などなくびっくりしました。だけど、他民族が住むマレーシアでは食がコミュニケーションの中心だということもあり、このような気遣いだけでも会話が広がり、友情が生まれることがあります!

僕の中では一日3食が当たり前でした!だけど、マレーシアでは一日に5食程度食べる人も珍しくありません。例えば、朝食と昼食の間や昼食の後に、間食をすることもあります。屋台やカフェが朝から夜まで開いていて、家族や友人と楽しく食事することができます!多様な食文化が存在する国なのもあり、少しずつ色々な食事を楽しめるのも魅力のひとつです!

マレーシアのフードコートでは様々な楽しみ方があります!フードコートは、人と人の信頼関係を築く場所でもあるからです。写真を見たらわかるように、マレーシアのフードコートには値段などが表示されていることが少ないです。最初はこのようなシステムに驚きましたが、マレーシアではこれが普通です。たまには、自分が食事した後、自己申告で食べたものを伝えるという場合もあります。お店側とお客さんの信頼関係があるからこそ成り立つシステムで好感をもてました。

マレーシアでは屋台やフードコートに展示されている食べ物はすべてお持ち帰りが可能です!ここで驚いたのが、麺類やカレーなどのお持ち帰りの仕方です。普段スープ系のものをお持ち帰りする際、カップなどに入れて持ち帰るのが普通だと思っていたのですが、マレーシアでは袋の中に入れます!カップにスープ類を入れるとよく蓋の部分から漏れることがあるのですが袋の方がこぼれにくくて驚きました!

僕が住んでいるクチンではフードコートや屋台がすごく多いです。クチンに着いた当初はお腹が空いていてもオーダーの仕方がわからず、まるで、「はじめてのおつかい」に出ている子供のようでした!

初めて行ったフードコートではどうすればいいのか分からず、とりあえず僕の前に並んでいたお客さんを見ていたらセルフサービスということに気づき、とりあえず列に並んでみました。

しかし、並べられているおかずが何かわからずここでも前のお客さんの真似をしてみると、お皿の上は見た事のない料理でいっぱい!

この後お会計をして食事かな?と思いきや僕の目の前のお客さんは、そのまま食事をはじめました。財布をもったまま迷子のように立ち尽くしていると、英語を話せる店員さんが「テーブルで払うんだよ」と教えてくれ、そのまま空いている席につきました。しかし、いくらまってもお会計が来ず食事に手をつけずにまっていると現地の人が「食事がおわってから払うのよ」と教えてくれやっと食事にありつけることができました。

マレーシアのフードコートは日本のシステムと違うため、すこしマレー語がわかっていると便利だと思います。

海外にいき、新しい文化に触れる時には好奇心と新しいものへの興味に溢れていますよね?マレーシアに着いた最初の週、僕はリーズナブルな食事に浮かれて、食べたいものを次々に食べていきました。アメリカでの移住経験をもつ僕にとって、こちらの食事も身体にあうはずだろうと考えていました。しかし、この甘い考え方のせいで翌日僕は腹痛に悩まされることになりました。マレーシアの食事はどれもおいしく満足できるものですが、外国人の私たちの身体が現地のスパイスや材料に慣れるには、すこし時間がかかるようです。

サラワクの料理はどれも美味しく魅力的なものばかりで挑戦したいものばかりですが、中には日本人の身体には合わないスパイスなども含まれているため、旅行中の胃薬は念のために持ち歩くのが懸命でしょう!

Written by: Kenta Kojima

Article source: http://sarawaktourism.com/blog/feed/