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MELAKA RIVER PROJECT NOW A MODEL FOR OTHERS

14 June 2013| last updated at 11:38PM

Sungai Melaka project a model for others

By Jason Gerald | [email protected]

REHABILITATION: The once lifeless waterway has been turned into Malacca’s most lucrative tourism product

THE phrase “Everything began in Malacca” is not something which was just coined to attract tourism, but is in actual fact what this state has to offer to other states in Malaysia.

The birth of the nation is attributed to the glory of the Malacca sultanate in the 15th century, and Malacca is where the independence of Malaysia was first announced by the country’s founding father, Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra Al Haj at the Dataran Pahlawan in Banda Hilir.

Malacca has been a benchmark for many developments in the country after the state was steered into becoming a developed state — recognised by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) — and is now spearheading the nation’s green technology initiatives.

And now, what was once famed as one of the busiest ports in the world, the Melaka River, is becoming a benchmark for the rehabilitation and beautification of rivers throughout the country.

Known as the Venice of the East in the 15th century, the waterway had slowly deteriorated and became one of the dirtiest rivers in the country till some 12 years ago.

In 2001, the state government, with assistance from the Federal Government, had embarked on the first phase of the Melaka River beautification project costing some RM200 million.

The first phase of the Melaka River rehabilitation project started at the tip of the river mouth to the Hang Tuah bridge which included the construction of two new jetties and an archway across the river.

The restoration and beautification project paid off handsomely, as now the once lifeless river has not only been revived but it has been turned into the most lucrative tourism product that Malacca has to offer.

The recent Sungai Melaka International River Festival created history when the Drainage and Irrigation Department director-general, Datuk Ahmad Husaini Sulaiman, said the State administration’s success in turning the river into one of the finest in the country, region and also the world would be the main point of reference for the revival and beautification of all rivers in the country.

The effort taken by the Malacca government in beautifying the Melaka River has not only managed to turn the river into a commodity for tourism but also helped in mitigating floods.

Under the 10th Malaysia Plan all rivers in the country were allocated RM3.47 billion for flood mitigation works, rehabilitation and beautification exercise. Melaka alone was allocated RM285 million.

In Malacca’s case, this money was not only used for flood mitigation works but also for the cleaning, beautification, and upgrading of the river system from the Sungai Melaka estuary right up to Malim.

This success of making Sungai Melaka into a living river is proposed to be replicated across the country.

Sungai Melaka is flanked by several delightful structures such as the Dutch or Red Square, traditional villages and other tourist attractions. In the second phase of its rehabilitation would start at the Hang Jebat bridge up to Batu Hampar, covering 5.2km.

The second phase would be divided into three main work packages; first would cover a 2.4km waterway from the Hang Jebat bridge to the Tun Razak bridge, followed by 1.2km from the Tun Razak bridge to the Melaka Sentral bridge, and the final package from the Melaka Sentral bridge to the Tidal Control Gate that stretches for 1.6km.

This would also include deepening the depth of the river, constructing walls and walkways along the river, landscapes, three water taxi stations at Taman Rempah and Jusco AEON, building unique bridges and beautifying the banks of the river.

Once the project is completed, the water quality of Sungai Melaka is expected to improve from class 111 barometer to class 11B by the year 2015.

The current success of the Melaka River rehabilitation and beautification project could also be seen through the Melaka River Cruise.

When the cruise started in 2006 there were only 56 visitors, but last year alone it attracted some 1.1 million passengers, and this year it is targeted that the Melaka River Cruise would attract some 1.4 million visitors.

Besides being a benchmark for rivers in Malaysia, the Malacca government is also aiming to work towards getting this event listed on the World Tourism Calendar of Events, similar to the San Antonio River festival in Texas, United States.

Read more: Sungai Melaka project a model for others – Columnist – New Straits Times http://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnist/sungai-melaka-project-a-model-for-others-1.299900#ixzz2WE8IVouO

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Thursday November 22, 2012

Have mausoleum for Parameswara

DURING the recent Deepavali holidays, my family and I went to Malacca.

While driving around Malacca town, I noticed Parameswara, the founder of Malacca, had a very short road named after him.

Tun Razak, our “ Bapa Pembangunan” has the longest road in Malacca named after him.

I am not saying, naming the longest road in Malacca after our beloved late Prime Minister is wrong, but why not credit the founder of Malacca with a road which is more prominent and deserving.

We all have learnt since Form 1 that Parameswara was the founder of Malacca.

It’s sad to see that while most of the warriors of Malacca have mausoleums, the main man, who named and brought such progress to the state doesn’t have one.

I’ve read a few articles that the mausoleumof Parameswara is under the lighthouse built by the Portuguese in 1528 or 1529.

Why does the archaeology department not take proactive measures and redesign a mausoleum for the founder of Malacca?

Parameswara was not a myth. Let’s ensure he gets a proper mausoleum for his contributions.

Since the Government is making history a compulsory subject, why not start with what we have.

If Hang Jebat and his friends can have a mausoleum, it’s a shame we don’t have one for Parameswara.

If the A Famosa was patched and rebuilt a few times, what does it take to build a mausoleum for Parameswara?

MEYSHNA NAIR 

Kuala Lumpur

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default

PULAU MELAKA IN THE FUTURE

A photo of Pulau Melaka in the future if all the proposed development are carried out there. There is the proposed cable car, Eye of Malacca, hotel, bungalows, Arab City Mall(under construction phase). Currently, there is the mosque on the Straits of Malacca which is very popular with tourists and sea lion show. Hope more visitors will come and the shophouses can be tenanted.

Something to look forward to at Pulau Melaka.

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default

PRICES AND RENTALS OF HERITAGE SHOPHOUSES RISE IN HISTORIC MELAKA

9th. October 2012

Since the announcement of Malacca and Georgetown as World Heritage Cities in 2008, both cities have seen a rise of local and foreign tourists arrivals. Melaka has seen tourists arrival increase from 8 million in 2008 to about an estimate of 13 million visitors in 2012 or about 15% increase year on year basis. These arrivals have helped Melaka and Malaccans economically and tourism is regarded as one of major source of income despite her small population. Malaccans cannot deny that fact tourism has benefitted them.

With Melaka being world recognised as a heritage city, property prices and rentals within the Heritage city areas have jumped by 30%. Within the Jonker street and Heeren street, heritage freehold shophouses prices are now being offered between 3 to 5 Million which are unheard of previously. Foreigners especially Singaporeans and Australians consider these prices as cheap in relative terms to the exchange rates. Singaporeans in particular are buying up these properties as investments since Melaka is just 3.5 hours drive away from Singapore.

At the same time, property owners within Melaka are also asking for higher rentals for businesses. Some businessmen from KL are also coming in to invest in properties and businesses as they see the potential of Melaka as a popular tourist destination. Similar trends are also seen in Georgetown, Penang.

New developments in international brands and boutique hotels are being constructed in Melaka and shopping malls are being built on reclaimed land around Bandar Hilir and Klebang. Hopefully, with the construction of new roads such as the coastal road at Klebang and expansion of the Ayer Keroh highway (construction of flyovers at strategic interchanges) will held weekend traffic jams.

Melaka Historical City council should undertake and develop a masterplan so that Melaka can benefit from this in years ahead.

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default

SAN DUO TEMPLE IN MELAKA

Ancient Malacca temple hopes to be marked on tourist map

Huge incense burner (left), placed at the spot since 1892, at the 200-year-old ancient San Duo Temple in Malacca. (Right) Stela to record every rebuild period of the temple.

Sin Chew Daily/Asia News Network
Friday, Mar 30, 2012
MALACCA – The Jalan Tokong Besi in Chinatown of Malacca is also known as Harmony Street, as worship places of three religions are located peacefully along the same street. Among them is 200-year-old ancient San Duo Temple.

The street also symbolises the harmonious coexistence of Buddhism, Taoism, Islamism and Hinduism in Malaysia.

The San Duo Temple is seldom mentioned due to the lack of propaganda. However, visitors always being impressed by the temple’s rich historical heritage. Therefore, the Malacca Kwang Tung Huay Kuan entrusted to manage the temple hopes that the temple can be included in the Malacca tourist map.

The San Duo Temple has 217 years of history and was formally called the Qing Long Hui when it was built in 1795. It was later renamed as the San Duo Temple after the expansion was completed in 1857.

Many utensils in the temple, including incense burners and plaques, are originated from the Chinese Manchu Dynasty and being placed at the temple in 1891. The entrusted body also spent thousands of ringgit last year to repair relics in the temple.

(Left) “The 18th years of the Guangxu Empire” is clearly engraved on the beam. (Right) Ancient plaques hung on a wall of the temple’s main hall shine after being repaired in recent years.
Malacca Kwang Tung Huay Kuan director Huang Da Wen said that the association hopes that the temple can be officially recognised as a tourist attraction to further promote the temple’s characteristics and historical values.

He said that many tourists who passed by the Jalan Tokong Besi had been impressed by the ancient temple.

He also said that many century-old historical relics in the temple are priceless tourist attractions and if the government attaches importance to the temple and help to promote, it can help the association to strengthen maintenance and improve management of the temple’s affairs.

He added that the maintenance of the temple relies on donations from worshipers and the association’s assistence. Under a great financial pressure, the temple hold a chingay every two years.

(From left) The ancient bell originated from the 17th year of the Guangxu Empire is a precious historical treasure; historical utensils and a 155-year-old stele in the temple.
San Duo temple executive secretary Li Jin Long said that as the Jalan Tukang Besi has become more and more popular, the number of the temple’s visitors have also increased. Therefore, if the government puts the temple on the tourist map, it is believed to attract more tourists.

He said that visitors are always surprised and impressed by the Chinese Manchu Dynasty utensils in the temple.

“No matter how expensive the cost is, we will still try to protect these historical items, including repairing plaques, columns and beams damaged by termites,” he added.

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default