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Mount Kinabalu

KK Bro

ALL ABOUT KK

Let us start off by saying there are so many places to cover when you visit Sabah, that we couldn’t even fit all of them in on our Taming Borneo adventure. It can get a little bit frustrating to plan your trip. Like really frustrating. We know what’s on your mind now; should we go explore Kinabalu Park? What is there to do in Kundasang Town? The fish spa in Ranau looks interesting, but is the Sandakan Crocodile Farm really worth the trip? As mentioned before, so many things to do in Sabah, but let’s start with things you can do at the heart of it all, Kota Kinabalu. On it’s own, Kota Kinabalu already has tons of places you should go and visit. But to make it easier for you, we’re going to split it into 3 sections; the city, the woods and the mountains.

IN THE BIG CITY

Being the centre of it all, Kota Kinabalu is your gateway to all things Sabah. It’s main airport, where all international flights land, is located approximately 10 minutes from the main town. Also, strategically located jetties, bus terminals and other forms of transportation is in close vicinity so we had no problem getting around.

Like the quirky charms of Sarawak’s Kuching , we got the same vibrant multicultural vibe from walking through the city. Some of the main attractions to ease your stay in the city in Kota Kinabalu are places like Gaya Street or the KK Waterfront where you can find your typical shopping malls, restaurants, bars and markets.
If you’re up for a bit of an adventure to find the best panoramic view of the city, we recommend the trek up to Signal Hill Observation Point in town, especially during the evening, because that’s the only thing that is between you and one of the best spots to view sunsets in the world.

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*Hamanahamanahama* Kundasang, Sabah

INTO THE WOODS 

One of the first places we checked out in Sabah was Kinabalu Park. Located about two hours from the city, this is the place for you to experience the beauty of the land. The park covers an area of 754 square feet surrounding Mount Kinabalu. Besides enjoying the surreal beauty that’s surrounding you, there are many attractions like mountain biking, golfing, bird watching, farm tours, hot springs, canopy walks and of course the place itself is a perfect ‘studio’ to practice your photography!

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Will model for food! Lok Kawi Wildlife Park, Sabah/Kampung Morolli Fish Spa

Mainly in Kinabalu Park, you can explore the many short trails which are marked with its distances. You could also trek all the way to the Timpohon Gate to catch a view of the majestic Mount Kinabalu for photos at the park centre.

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Cows are the new cats! Kundasang, Sabah

UP THE MISTY MOUNTAIN

Last time, we took our hiking gear to Bako National Park, but this time around, we trekked Kinabalu National Park to get to the highly praised mountain view of Sabah. We’ve heard that this is one of the best places in the world to catch the best sunset views. And we’ve got to say, this was where our Taming Borneo adventure peaked. Literally!

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“I can do this, I can do this”

Some backstory for this part of Sabah; formed about 10 to 35 million years ago, Mount Kinabalu is one of the youngest non-volcanic mountains in the world, and it’s still growing!

But of course, the main attraction of the park is obviously climbing the majestic Mount Kinabalu itself, standing at 4095.2 meters tall, which makes it, you guessed right, the highest mountain in South East Asia! Other than that, there are also activities like alpine rock climbing and paragliding that would satisfy your inner adrenaline junkie.

Quick note, anyone who wishes to climb this awe-inspiring mountain is advised to make reservations 6 months prior, as the number of climbers is limited to 135 pax daily. Don’t say you haven’t been warned.
If you have more questions regarding our Taming Borneo adventure, please do leave a comment in the comment section below, or start a discussion; tell us your personal Taming Borneo experience!

Also do follow along our adventure on our social media platforms:

Instagram: @MyTourismChannel or #tamingborneo

Catch up with our Taming Borneo episodes:

Sabah : EP16

Sabah : EP16

Sabah : EP17

Sabah : EP17

Sabah : EP18

Sabah : EP18

 

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

Lets go, Borneo!

THE CURIOUS CASE OF WANDERLUST FEVER

Looking back now, waiting to board our plane back home, we still can’t believe that we actually did it!

The journey has been unbelievable to us, after months of planning and restless anticipation, we finally got to pack our travel gear, cameras a really really good powerbank (we’re millennials after all) and headed off for an adventure of a lifetime in Borneo!

For a month, we travelled across the South China Sea, to the Malaysian states of Sarawak and Sabah; to experience the best they have to offer. We sought out the best experiences, to learn new interesting cultures eat tantalizing local cuisines. But, our main purpose was to really immerse ourselves in the adventure that awaited us.

Like you probably are now, we were tired and bored of our 9-5 working lives. Day in and day out of the office, which one of us hasn’t felt like living zombies before? We needed a break from the rat-race, away from the overbearing ambiance of the city. Living in metropolis had exhausted our senses.  A short respite from the never ending sights of cold glass skyscrapers and the screeching sounds of the passing traffic was all that we needed.

Crashing waves, chirping birds, cool sea breezes and warm sandy beaches; what do they all have in common?

Answer: They are all constant in our lunchbreak fantasies. If you won’t admit it, we will!

Bitten by the travel bug, we were your definite stereotypical Wanderlusters.

At first, we were skeptical of curing our wanderlust fever in Sabah and Sarawak. Even as local Malaysians, the two states were still a mystery to us as everything we’ve ever known about them were from school textbooks or local papers. But after reading great reviews online and hearing personal experiences from family members alike, we decided not to skip this one out.

Now that we’ve experienced it, we can say they are truly the hidden gems of Malaysian tourism.

INTO THE WILDS OF BORNEO

IMAGINE THIS.

You are now standing in the middle a 130-million-year old tropical rainforest, while your cityscape fades to the recesses of your mind, let it stay there. It is truly a breathtaking sight; you are surrounded by towering ancient trees while rays of sunlight warm your face through the rustling greens of the canopies. Said to not only have one of the most biodiverse rainforests, it is also one of the most culturally diverse places on the planet. There is so much to be discovered here in Borneo!

Sunset straight out of a dream! Miri, Sarawak

Sunset straight out of a dream! Miri, Sarawak

On our journey, we’ve passed through the enchanting forests of Bako National Park, had a little dance battle in the center of a drum circle at the Rainforest World Music Festival in Sarawak, swam in the clear waters of Semporna and trekked the Mountain View in Kinabalu Park, Sabah. Being the beach bums we are, we also hung out at some of the most pristine secluded beaches in Malaysia. That’s just us touching the surface of the water.

All things fresh and rare at Kota Kinabalu, Sabah

All things fresh and rare at Kota Kinabalu, Sabah

No picture in the world can do justice to Mount Kinabalu, Sabah

No picture in the world can do justice to Mount Kinabalu, Sabah

We saw rare Proboscis Monkeys in the lush greeneries of Danum Valley, and not to mention majestic Hornbills taking flight right in front of our eyes! We even saw the legendary Orangutan at the Matang Wildlife Centre and visited endangered Sunbears at The Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre. It’s literally the wildest we’ve ever been!

One thing we’ve learned from the trip is that the world has so much more to offer; if you show your interest in it. If there is anything we hope to accomplish with our Taming Borneo series, it is to encourage others to follow in our footsteps, and explore the world beyond the comfort of your front door.

Take action. Plan your trip, and cure that wanderlust fever!

If you have more questions regarding our Taming Borneo adventure, please do leave a comment in the comment section below, or start a discussion; tell us your personal Taming Borneo experience!

Also do follow along our adventure on our social media platforms:

Instagram: @MyTourismChannel or #tamingborneo         

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

LETS GO, BORNEO!

 

THE CURIOUS CASE OF WANDERLUST FEVER

Looking back now, waiting to board our plane back home, we still can’t believe that we actually did it!

The journey has been unbelievable to us, after months of planning and restless anticipation, we finally got to pack our travel gear, cameras a really really good powerbank (we’re millennials after all) and headed off for an adventure of a lifetime in Borneo!

For a month, we travelled across the South China Sea, to the Malaysian states of Sarawak and Sabah; to experience the best they have to offer. We sought out the best experiences, to learn new interesting cultures eat tantalizing local cuisines. But, our main purpose was to really immerse ourselves in the adventure that awaited us.

Like you probably are now, we were tired and bored of our 9-5 working lives. Day in and day out of the office, which one of us hasn’t felt like living zombies before? We needed a break from the rat-race, away from the overbearing ambiance of the city. Living in metropolis had exhausted our senses.  A short respite from the never ending sights of cold glass skyscrapers and the screeching sounds of the passing traffic was all that we needed.

Crashing waves, chirping birds, cool sea breezes and warm sandy beaches; what do they all have in common?

Answer: They are all constants in our lunchbreak fantasies. If you won’t admit it, we will!

Bitten by the travel bug, we were your definite stereotypical Wanderlusters.

At first, we were skeptical of curing our wanderlust fever in Sabah and Sarawak. Even as local Malaysians, the two states were still a mystery to us as everything we’ve ever known about them were from school textbooks or local papers. But after reading great reviews online and hearing personal experiences from family members alike, we decided not to skip this one out.

Now that we’ve experienced it, we can say they are truly the hidden gems of Malaysian tourism.

INTO THE WILDS OF BORNEO

IMAGINE THIS.

You are now standing in the middle a 130-million-year old tropical rainforest, while your cityscape fades to the recesses of your mind, let it stay there. It is truly a breathtaking sight; you are surrounded by towering ancient trees while rays of sunlight warm your face through the rustling greens of the canopies. Said to not only have one of the most biodiverse rainforests, it is also one of the most culturally diverse places on the planet. There is so much to be discovered here in Borneo!

Sunset straight out of a dream! Miri, Sarawak

Sunset straight out of a dream! Miri, Sarawak

On our journey, we’ve passed through the enchanting forests of Bako National Park, had a little dance battle in the center of a drum circle at the Rainforest World Music Festival in Sarawak, swam in the clear waters of Semporna and trekked the Mountain View in Kinabalu Park, Sabah. Being the beach bums we are, we also hung out at some of the most pristine secluded beaches in Malaysia. That’s just us touching the surface of the water.

All things fresh and rare at Kota Kinabalu, Sabah

All things fresh and rare at Kota Kinabalu, Sabah

 

No picture in the world can do justice to Mount Kinabalu, Sabah

No picture in the world can do justice to Mount Kinabalu, Sabah

We saw rare Proboscis Monkeys in the lush greeneries of Danum Valley, and not to mention majestic Hornbills taking flight right in front of our eyes! We even saw the legendary Orangutan at the Matang Wildlife Centre and visited endangered Sunbears at The Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre. It’s literally the wildest we’ve ever been!

One thing we’ve learned from the trip is that the world has so much more to offer; if you show your interest in it. If there is anything we hope to accomplish with our Taming Borneo series, it is to encourage others to follow in our footsteps, and explore the world beyond the comfort of your front door.

Take action. Plan your trip, and cure that wanderlust fever!

If you have more questions regarding our Taming Borneo adventure, please do leave a comment in the comment section below, or start a discussion; tell us your personal Taming Borneo experience!

Also do follow along our adventure on our social media platforms:

Instagram: @MyTourismChannel or #tamingborneo         

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

My Malaysia

By Lloyd Green

I sit here on the plane leaving Malaysia after eight months. An experience quite unlike any I have ever encountered. Malaysia is a country where the more you invest, the more you get out of it. You could be forgiven for thinking Malaysia is embodied by KL’s global reputation — its bright lights, shopping malls, bustling nightlife and iconic Petronas Twin Towers showcasing an opulence craved by many tourists — as well as pristine island getaways such as Langkawi and the Perhentian Islands.

But if you have ever had the chance to peer beyond its veneer, you will find a land of great beauty and a population eager to share it with you. This is where the real Malaysia lies and a world in which I’ve had the privilege to step into. You’ll enter one world and exit another taking with you snippets of many cultures that will not only shape your memories but also your relationships.

My Msia 1

The view from one of the more secluded areas at Genting Highlands

Much of my adventure here is owed to the great local friends I have made. They have afforded me an authentic experience not often chronicled in your local tour guides: Guest at an Indian wedding in Klang; life as a local at Orang Asli kampungs in the jungle near Gua Musang and Raub; a road trip to Pangkor; KL’s burgeoning comedy scene; a guided tour of the famed Kacang Putih industry in Ipoh; hiking around the intriguing Genting Highlands; celebrating Deepavali with Indian families in Klang; KL’s underground punk rock scene; teaching English in remote and rural communities; celebrating Christmas in the Portuguese Settlement in Malacca; adventures to Peninsular Malaysia’s most stunning waterfalls and hikes including Chilling Falls and Gunang Tahan; picking rambutans and bananas at plantations in the jungle; witnessing Iban tribal ceremonies in Sarawak; staying on a boat house in the Royal Belum National Park as well as tasting local delicacies such as the best fish noodle soup in Petaling Jaya and homemade Indian curries in Brickfields and Klang.

My Msia 2

You can hire a boat house and enjoy the tranquil Royal Belum National Park
(Pic http://belum.com.my/tour/2d-1n-houseboat-lake-temenggor/)

That’s not to say Malaysia’s main attractions are unworthy of your presence — the tourist trail in Malaysia is reliable and growing stronger all the time. In the economic hub of Kuala Lumpur, flavours and colour of India, China and Malay locals float inconspicuously, adding great contrast and history to this modern megacity with landmarks such as Batu Caves, Bukit Bintang and KLCC ensuring thousands continue to flock there.

Venture north to George Town in Penang and Ipoh for a romantic cocktail of art, architecture and colonial influences with night markets, Chinese hawker stalls in Batu Ferringhi, the original Old Town White Coffee in Ipoh and the emergence of urban street art in both places giving reason for tourism to thrive.

The chance to live and look after Orangutans as well as the quest of climbing Malaysia’s highest peak — Mount Kinabalu — will always ensure people go to Sabah and the magic of the Rainforest World Music Festival is a beacon for Sarawak tourism each year. And of course if island hopping and diving is your thing, then you’ll fall in love with places such as Sipadan, Mabul, Kapalai, Layang Layang and Lankayan.

Malaysia has no doubt won a special place in my heart and I urge other travellers, tourists and expatriates to immerse yourself in the culture and let Malaysia sweep you off your feet. You will never regret it.

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Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

Discovering Sabah’s World War Two sites

Discovering Sabah’s World War Two sites

I am station gravely in a gummy heat, my shirt sticking to my back, notwithstanding a fact I’m in a shadowy area of forest. It’s midst morning nonetheless it’s already breathless and steam is high here during Sandakan Memorial Park, in a Sabah segment of Malaysian Borneo.

Pic: Terence Carter.

Pic: Terence Carter.

I’ve assimilated a organisation of some 60 people, mostly Australian passengers from a Orion tour boat that has docked during Sandakan for a day. Two Australian women are laying a spray during a bottom of a black marble monument, another dual mount together, tears welling in their eyes, and arms related to comfort any other.

The 4 women are descendents of a 6 Australian organisation who survived a horrific Sandakan Death Marches in that 2,400 Australian and British Prisoners of War (POWs) died between Jan and Aug 1945, and they’re here, along with a rest of a group, to compensate their respects.

Sabah is best famous to many travellers as an outlandish pleasant finish that’s plentiful with wildlife and boasts some of a world’s best diving, snorkelling and hiking. Yet it’s also a site of some of a many horrific atrocities committed opposite POWs during a Second World War.

The shaggy park, now soaring with lofty trees from that we mark midget squirrels leaping from bend to branch, was a plcae of a strange Sandakan Prisoner of War camp, where some 2,700 Aussie and Brit soldiers were brought by a Japanese after a tumble of Singapore in Feb 1942 to build an airstrip.

Some 300 were eliminated to other camps, with a residue subjected to a many heartless of conditions. Sick, weak, starving, and over-worked, pang from pleasant ulcers and malaria, they were forced over 3 perpetual durations to substitute some 250 kilometres from Sandakan to Renau. They possibly died or were killed, mostly in horrific circumstances, on their approach or on arrival, with only 6 Australian organisation surviving, after evading into a jungle and being helped by internal people.

Every year, thousands of Australians and British revisit a sites, and experiencing these places with comparison Australians who have a tie to a comfortless events can be really moving. If you’re travelling in Borneo and would like to compensate your respects, these are a pivotal sites of decoration in Sabah we should experience:

Sandakan Memorial Park
It’s value commencement your revisit by reading a arrangement play during a tiny though constrained museum in a normal wooden pavilion during a centre of a park so that we fast benefit an bargain of a ruin that a 2,400 Australian and British soldiers went by in this clearly willing forest. The black and white photos and testimonies exhibit how really opposite it was when they were detained here in a shutting years of a war.

Pic: Terence Carter.

Pic: Terence Carter.

Labuan War Memorial
Nothing can utterly ready oneself for this huge area of manicured lawns with quarrel on quarrel of marble headstones etched with a many touching of messages – there are roughly 4,000 Commonwealth soldiers buried here in total. Jalan Tanjung Purun, 2kms easterly of town, Pulau Labuan.

Kundasang War Memorial
The lovingly tended Australian and English gardens here commemorate a prisoners of fight who died here during a finish of a horrific Death Marches. Protected by high walls, any garden is utterly opposite to a other, a Australian garden comprising a sprawling grass with flower beds, modelled on a standard suburban garden, a other a quintessentially British lodge garden. Visitors are invited initial to an air-conditioned room to watch a touching Australian documentary, that follows a new tour of a organisation of Australians, including immature soldiers, re-tracing a route. Equally touching are a photographs, articles, letters, and several outfit on display. There are lists of those who died on a Marches in a third area with a prolonged arbour shading a pond, with stately views of Mount Kinabalu. Various reports explain that a soldiers came to hatred Mount Kinabalu, ceaselessly in their sights and representing utterly a opposite plea than it does today. On a KK-Ranau Highway, nearby a connection to a Mesilau Nature Resort, Renau.

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