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Murugan

Best motorbike routes in Malaysia

By Vishnu Krishnan

Throttle heads, gun your engines because we’re taking you across the best and most scenic bike routes in Malaysia.

Malaysia, despite being a small country, has thousands of kilometers of paved roads that meander and criss-cross through small towns, cities, rural areas, coastal roads and majestic mountainous and forested regions.

Let’s Go!

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A useful map for plotting the first leg!

(Source: https://ridewithgps.com/routes/6040239)

 Starting in Kuala Lumpur, head north on the Gombak MRR2 highway and cut off at the Genting Highlands exit. You will know you are on the right path if you bypass the large golden statue of Murugan on your left at Batu Caves. If you’d like to make a pit stop here and check out the marvellous Batu Caves Hindu temple, you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

As you ride up the Kuala Lumpur – Karak Expressway towards the foothills of the highlands, this is where the fun really begins. Once you pass the Genting Sempah checkpoint (they have lovely local food to sample and is the last major gas station for the stretch) the gradient will get serious and the temperature drops.

Near the summit of Genting, make sure you check out the Chin Swee Caves Temple filled with pagodas and Taoist motifs that is best seen at night when the red lanterns are lit.

At the peak you will reach the Hotel-Casino complexes. From here you, cruise back down to the Bentong exit. Beware of the winding roads, slippery gravel and mist. The Bentong trail is a beautiful mountain road surrounded by lush forests and wildlife. One major attraction here is the Sungai Chilling waterfall.

Follow the gorgeous mountain road all the way up to Fraser’s Hill which is known for its scenic, rolling green hills and chilly weather. If you aren’t done with the climbing yet, jump on the Ringlet — Sungai Koyan Highway or Route 102 for another 186km to the even more beautiful

Cameron Highlands. Strawberries and tea anyone?

Next, move further north to one of the most scenic routes in the country, the Gerik or East-West Highway. Starting at exit A171 or the town of Gerik, this 128km pilgrimage is a must for all avid bikers. Along the way to the small town of Jeli, you will go through a mountain trail with soft gradients and smooth curves. If you are lucky, you may spot wild elephants.

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Our pachyderm friends can sometimes be seen on the Gerik Highway!

(Source: http://chongtaofatt.blogspot.my/2006_05_01_archive.html)

From Jeli, travel on Route 4 via the East West Highway to Kota Bharu to commence the longest stretch of the journey, the Kota Bharu to Rompin coastal road.

While you are in Kota Bharu be sure to sample some of the scrumptious local delights such as Nasi Kerabu.

From Kota Bharu, ride 490km south along the E8 via the East Coast Expressway to Rompin. Along this path, you’ll see dozens of fishing villages, small coastal Kampongs, paddy fields and of course the South China Sea. Be mindful of rainy season as the East coast can be treacherous between October and March.

The ride itself is generally tame and relaxing, but there’s much to see and check out along the way, especially through the Terengganu coast which is full of seafood stops.

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The scenery along the coast is amazing on E8!

(Source: http://bikingmalaysia.blogspot.my/)

Once you reach the forested region of Rompin and stay the night on the beach, we’ll end the journey with a 292km cruise back to KL via Route 11. These roads are well maintained and provide a smooth journey returning home.

Do you know of other scenic roads and beautiful stretches of highway? Let us know on Facebook @malaysia.travel.my

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

Thaipusam: a jubilee of faith and gratitude

While many of us associate Thaipusam with crowds during temples and a grand steer of kavadi bearers, how many of us indeed know a stress of a occasion?

A advocate temperament a kavadi – a pitch of piety and devotion

Thaipusam comes from an amalgam of a difference “Thai” – referring to a Tamil month of Thai (January – February) – and Pusam – a brightest star during this period. Falling between 15 Jan and 15 Feb each year, Thaipusam is a jubilee of Lord Murugan’s feat over Soorapadman’s tyranny.

Soorapadman believed himself godlike given he can't be killed by anything other than a being that was a phenomenon of Lord Shiva, one of a many critical Hindu deities. Unluckily for him, Lord Murugan was one such being and he used his stalk or vel, that was given to him by Lord Shiva’s consort, Parvati, to better Soorapadman.

So it is that during Thaipusam, a people appreciate Lord Murugan for extenuation their wishes and defeating a “daily demons” that disease their lives, be it illnesses, career blocks or infertility. Believers not entirely appreciate him, they also ask redemption for trangressions made, as good as urge for blessings.

The rituals of Thaipusam entirely start most progressing before a large day itself. Some devotees quick for some-more than a month before a arise while others trim their heads as an act of gratitude, defence or as a touching defence to have prayers answered.

On a eve of Thaipusam, a picture of Lord Murugan is ecstatic from one church to another, accompanied and waited on by devotees temperament offerings to a deity. Milk, a pitch of virginity and virtue, as good as flowers and fruits are common Thaipusam offerings. Kavadis, literally “sacrifice during each step”, can be seen trustworthy to devotees around hooks and skinny spears that pierce their backs, cheeks and mouths.

This can be utterly a steer for onlookers who no doubt consternation how these kavadi bearers withstand a pain, though devotees will tell we that their romantic faith in their Lord Murugan’s insurance spares them from pain and prevents them from shedding blood. Bearing a kavadi is an act of friendship and humility.

Additionally, coconuts are crushed to weigh a violation of a ego and a presentation of a purer self.

In Batu Caves – one of a focal points of Thaipusam jubilee in Malaysia – a approach concomitant a china chariot temperament Lord Murugan’s idol, starts from Sri Mahamariamman, in a centre of Kuala Lumpur, to a temples of Batu Caves. The approach entirely starts before midnight on a eve of Thaipusam and is a 15 kilometre tour that can simply take 8 hours.

Devotees wait for hours usually to locate a glance of Lord Murugan on his chariot and extend their offerings while hundreds of thousands some-more join a approach to a temples. The series of people during Batu Caves during Thaipusam can operation from 700,000 right adult to 1.5 million. At Batu Caves, devotees steadily lift their offerings and kavadi bearers staunchly shoulder their burdens adult 272 stairs to a temple.

Celebrations also take place in other tools of a country. Other principal places of jubilee embody a Waterfall Temple in Penang and Kallumalai Temple in Ipoh, Perak.

A approach concomitant a chariot temperament a Hindu deity as it creates a approach to a church during Thaipusam

Thaipusam, to any who are propitious to declare a festivities, is both a clear jubilee of colours and a fascinating arrangement of faith. Yet, this is not a entirely Hindu festival that is value temperament declare to. Other holy days, critical to Hindu faith and culture, are usually as engaging and engrossing.

Deepavali, literally definition “rows of lamps”, for example, is a jubilee of light triumphing over dark. On this day in a Tamil month of Aippasi (October – November), one fable has it that a Lord Krishna degraded a demon aristocrat Naraka. Hindus applaud a arise by anointing themselves in oil and partaking in a protocol bath early in a morning on Deepavali day. Then new garments are ragged and prayers are performed. Deepavali is utterly presumably a best famous Hindu festival in Malaysia. Other festivals besides Thaipusam and Deepavali are:

Thai-ponggal

Celebrated for 4 days, commencement from a initial day of a Tamil month of Thai, Ponggal means a “boiling over” of rice and is a invocation to a elements that have contributed to a good collect – especially a object and a cattle. On this day, a cattle gets a well-deserved day of rest, a good rinse and their sheds likewise get a consummate cleaning. They are also flashy with garlands and fed with ponggal – sweet rice. The Sun God is thanked as good with both prayers and honeyed rice. But a thankfulness isn’t entirely singular to a Sun God and a cattle; on a third day of celebration, visits are done to family and friends, employers entirely benefaction gifts to their employees and singular women benefaction offerings to their home deities, praying for a estimable husband.

Sivarathiri

Taking place on a 13th night of a Tamil month of Masi (February – March), this is a festival of fasting and prayers. It is also famous as Shiva’s Night.

Panguni Utthiram

This festival falls on a same day as that of Lord Shiva’s kinship with Parvathi and a birth of Lord Murugan from sparks emanating from Lord Shiva’s eyes. Falling on a day of a full moon in a Tamil month of Panguni (March – April), a festival is distinguished most like Thaipusam in Murugan temples.

Tamil New Year

Here new year refers to a initial day of a Tamil month of Chittirai (April – May). It is on this day that a object enters a initial pointer of a Hindu zodiac – Aries. During a Tamil New Year (also famous as a Hindu New Year), a residence is entirely spotless and decorated. This includes a request room that will be ornate with bullion jewellery, rice, silk cloths and other enlightened objects. Those who take partial in a celebrations wear new clothes, eat a vegetarian dish and go to a church to perform prayers.

Navaratthiri

Literally definition “Nine Nights”, this festival is distinguished in a Tamil month of Puraddasi (September – October). The celebrations are in honour of a enchantress Shakti, who is a “Great Divine Mother” in Hindu belief. On this day, a kolu – a dais with 9 stairs – is filled with a images of Hindu deities and saints while a “Great Divine Mother” is invited to take her place on a kumpam – a beautifully decorated, water-filled pot that is lonesome with husked coconut as good as mango leaves and placed on banana root that also has rice on it. Offerings in a form of 9 forms of grains are placed during a kumpan as well.

 


Map: Batu Caves


Mini Thaipusam

Mini Thaipusam in vital colour

Miss World Malaysia 2009 Thanuja Ananthan

Colours of Deepavali [PIC]

Oil Lamp or Vilakku

Deepavali – The Festival of Lights

Malaysian Children

Festivals and celebrations in Malaysia

Arulmugu Sri Ruthra Veeramuthu Maha Mariamman Temple

A church stands proud

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Thaipusam

Thaipusam is distinguished by Hindus on a full moon day in a Thai month of a Tamil calendar, that is in Jan or February.

Also famous as Thaipooyam or Thaippooyam in Malayalam, it is a festival to symbol a birth of Lord Murugan, a youngest son of Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvati.

The festival also noted an arise when Parvati gave Murugan a vel (lance) so he could overcome a immorality demon Soorapadman.

Hindu devotees in Malaysia distinguished Thaipusam on 8th Feb 2009 to symbol a birth of Lord Murugan by going to several temples in a country.

The chanting of “vel, vel” rose above Batu Caves as an estimated 1.2 million Hindu devotees and visitors alive a Sri Subramaniar Swamy Temple for Thaipusam 2009.

Here are some extraordinary photos of a jubilee of Thaipusam.

Malaysia Thaipusam 2009
Image credit: SJ Photography

Image Malaysia Thaipusam 2009

Photo Malaysia Thaipusam 2009
Image credit: kiki-la-la

Photos Malaysia Thaipusam 2009
Image credit: xiangxi

Images Malaysia Thaipusam 2009
Image credit: xiangxi

Event Malaysia Thaipusam 2009
Image credit: xiangxi

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