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Orang Asli

Malaysia Top 7 events in October

 

Nine Emperor Gods Festival

Where: Penang

When: Oct 1 – 9

For the ultimate cultural experience, check out the Nine Emperor Gods Festival. Taking place on the ninth day of the ninth lunar month at various temples across Penang, this Taoist festival honours the nine sons of Tou Mu, controller of the books of life and death. Devotees adhere to a strict vegetarian diet to cleanse their body and soul. One can find a variety of vegetarian stalls along the roads and lanes around Penang with delicious and creative vegetarian cuisines. A must for all foodies! Other highlights include self-mutilation rituals like Spear Skewing Ceremony, Hot Oil Ceremony and Fire Walking Ceremony. The celebration reaches its climax on the ninth day with a procession to send the deities back home, from Nine Emperor Gods Temple in Butterworth to the beach.

More information: http://www.tourismpenang.net.my/

Image: Devotee during the Spear Skewing Ceremony

Image: Devotee during the Spear Skewing Ceremony

 

30th Mt. Kinabalu International Climbathlon 

Where: Kota Kinabalu, Sabah

When: Oct 15 – 16

Thousands of people try to conquer Mount Kinabalu every year. It normally takes them two days. At this event, professional mountain runners from around the world will attempt to scale the iconic peak in just under four hours. Amazing! It’s a high level adventure and a perfect opportunity to discover the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Kinabalu Park.

More information: www.sabahtourism.com

Image: Contestant ascending the steep slopes of Mt Kinabalu

Image: Contestant ascending the steep slopes of Mt Kinabalu

 

CIMB Classic 2016

Image: CIMB Classic 2013 and 2014 winner Ryan Moore

Image: CIMB Classic 2013 and 2014 winner Ryan Moore

Where: TPC Kuala Lumpur (formerly Kuala Lumpur Golf Country Club)

When: Oct 20 – 23

Catch the world’s best players in action at the only official PGA TOUR FedExCup event in Southeast Asia. It features a limited 78-player field, with a prize purse of US$7 million (RM28.4 million) and no cut, making it one the richest professional golf tournaments in the region. USA’s Justin Thomas will be hoping to defend his crown against a field including two-time champion at TPC Kuala Lumpur, American Ryan Moore.

More information: Tickets can be purchased at www.CIMBClassic.com or call +603 7880 7999

International Aborigines Arts Festival 

Where: Titiwangsa Lake Gardens, Kuala Lumpur

When: Oct 21 – 23

This unique arts festival features cultural works of the Orang Asli of Malaysia as well as indigenous people from around the world including Indonesia, Thailand and Philippines. There are various activities and stage performances, exhibitions and interactive demonstrations to be enjoyed. Organisers say the three-day event helps to showcase the uniqueness, heritage, traditions and customs of indigenous people across the world.

More information: [email protected]

Image: The festival includes traditional Orang Asli performances

Image: The festival includes traditional Orang Asli performances

 

Image: Be sure to feast on the banquet served at MIGF

Image: Be sure to feast on the banquet served at MIGF

  1. Ancient Shadows: World Shadow Puppet Exhibition

Where: National Museum, Kuala Lumpur

When: Oct 25 – Nov 30

The World Shadow Puppet Exhibition comes to KL with the best exponents of shadow puppetry from Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Cambodia, China, India and Taiwan set to enthral audiences. Shadow Puppet plays, also known as wayang kulitin Bahasa Malaysia, is an old tradition and has a rich history in Southeast Asia. Puppets are made primarily of leather and manipulated with sticks or buffalo horn handles; shadows are cast using an oil lamp or more commonly halogen lights. The exhibition lasts for over a month, so there’s plenty of time to take the family.

More information: www.jmm.gov.my

Image: KL will greet Shadow Puppet masters from all over Asia.

Image: KL will greet Shadow Puppet masters from all over Asia.

  1. Terengganu International Islamic Arts Festival 2016

Where: Taman Tamadun Islam (TTI) Convention Centre, Terengganu

When: Oct 29 – 31

You will find Khat writing workshops, musical performances, Muslim fashion and much more at the International IslamicArts Festival of Terengganu. It’s a beautiful way to discover more about the Islamic culture and arts and maybe learn a new skill while listening to beautiful music. Such rich heritage has something to offer for all visitors.

More information: www.motac.gov.my

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

Why volunteering in Malaysia is a must?

Want to check out Malaysia in a fun, cheap and rewarding way. Why not volunteer? There are plenty of programmes and non-profit organisations offering once in a lifetime experiences where you’ll truly feel Malaysian. Here are some of the perks:

Integration into culture!
If you volunteer in Malaysia, there is no doubt you will gain a better understanding of the local culture than compared to if rush your way through the country. Little by little, you will be much more integrated into the environment and will have the chance to see, do and experience things that most people don’t. If you work as a teach, your experience with local children will open your eyes to another world and give you exposure to family life. It’s also possible to volunteer at animal sanctuaries where you will be impressed by the treasures of nature and the stunning fauna and flora of Malaysia.

animal-volunteer

Help this guy and his friends live for a thousand more years

Meeting amazing people
When you travel you meet lots of travellers, when you work you meet lots of workers. But when you volunteer you get to know many different people, especially locals. For example, if you teach English you will get to know all your students and their families. They will probably open the doors of their houses for you and invite you to eat with them. You will get to know all the members of the community and try delicious meals and participate in local traditions and customs. Most NGO’s in Malaysia also work with international volunteers providing a great platform to meet people from all over the world. The fact that you are working together for a cause will make it easy to connect with each other. You will build memories and friendships for life!

enjoy-malaysia

Take in the best of Malaysia with new friends

Discover remote and beautiful places
Another beautiful thing about volunteering in Malaysia is all the wonderful places you will discover. You may be stuck in the city teaching during the week, but Malaysia’s proximity to wonderful destinations both local and foreign makes it so easy to explore the region. If you are volunteering in a rural or remote area, you will feel like a local — particularly if you love being off the beaten track, exploring the dense bush land and pristine beaches. You will also meet locals or other long-term volunteers who can give you travel advice on secret spots of Malaysia. Throw away your travel guide for a moment and discover the unexpected secrets of Peninsular Malaysia and Borneo.

explore-malaysia

Explore the hidden gems of Malaysia

 

Malaysia on a budget
One of the perks of volunteering instead of travelling or being on a holiday is it’s relatively cheap. If you are volunteering in Malaysia, most likely you will receive free accommodation and food. You will also probably live far from tourist hotspots which will help in cutting down costs. This will also help you become accustom to identifying the cheapest forms of transport and where to find a bargain.

ringgit-business-times

Malaysia currency the ringgit • Image Source

 Challenge yourself
Being a tourist is easy and working in a big company is convenient. Volunteering is a whole different story, full of challenges and surprises. If you are a teacher in an Orang Asli community or if you are working with animals in the rainforest, your days will not be the same. You will improve yourself and become a better person, capable of overcoming the unforeseen. Instead of coming home with some postcards you will be enriched with adventures, lessons and experiences for life.

challenge-yourself

No better place to explore your horizons than Malaysia

Your help matters
There are countless benefits of volunteering in Malaysia but the most important is your aid. Sure, you will live an extraordinary life, meet people and have lots of fun, but it’s the chance to improve someone’s life that you will treasure the most. Whether it’s teaching English in the jungle communities or working with turtles in Borneo, you will have a hands on impact in Malaysia and that counts more than anything!

help-malaysia

Malaysia is waiting for you to spread the love

 

Cover photo from yourvolunteers.com

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

Museum: Melaka Aboriginal Museum

The element of magic and ritual (pagan) are famous in their culture
making this ‘Orang Asli’ called a primitive. They also believe in forest or nature spirit where all daily activities must be blessed by the spirits or if not they will be cursed for their whole life. 

Article source: http://sayangmelaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default

The other side of Malaysia

By Lloyd Green

Like in any country, life away from the city is different. In rural Malaysia, village or kampung life is another beast. The Malays and Orang Asli here still practice their traditions, maintaining the old lifestyle of their people. It is completely different from the lifestyle in the city and you can see how different their life is.

To the locals it is more than just a home; it is a community where history and heritage lives on. From food, ceremonies and rituals to their connection and dependence on the land, there’s a sense of belonging — one not often found in the city.

Kampung life is sustained by agriculture; rice fields, fruit plantations, fishing and other types of farming. The family home in the kampung is well-kept and blends in with the surrounds of the village. Rambutan and rubber trees line the pathways with other types of vegetation providing shade from the harsh elements.

These shaded compounds are favourite places for school-yard games and social interaction as well as working areas. Attap and mat-weaving, drying, rice-pounding and carpentry are some of the common duties carried out. The space underneath each stilted house is also used to store food, fuel, building materials, farming equipment, bicycles and even cars.

De Visu / Shutterstock.com

Dense bushland and forest occupies the area surrounding these villages, with the echoes of children enjoying the cool waters of nearby rivers a welcome relief from the persistent horns of the city.

Our driver had turned down a narrow, sandy path past some neighbouring compounds, shacks and gardens, via the large lake that formed the focus of the kampung and towards a traditional styled home that stood resplendent between the trees. The 150-year-old structure had been given a splash of colour and was vibrant in pink and green.

We followed our guide past more wooden huts and through a muddy swamp until we found our night’s accommodation: A bamboo hut on the bank of the river, equipped with veranda and scenic views. The hospitality we received that night and in the morning was overwhelming.

Dozens of banana plantations dominate the valley. Pak Angah, a well known farmer show us his property. He sells each comb of his bananas for just over RM1. It’s enough to make around 300 ringgit per month.

the other side of malaysia 1

His children often accompany him in the picking of the bananas, as well as friends in the village. Much of the village operates this way. The husband leaves early in the morning to work on the land and the mother stays at home with the young children.

The kampung is eerily quiet during the day until the roaring engine of the school bus returns in the afternoon. Swarms of teenagers rush through the village yelling, running and laughing — their mothers often scolding at them to return home.

the other side of malaysia 2

The roads here connecting the kampungs to the highway vary in quality. At night and during rainy season they can be quite dangerous. One particular section of road we took was diabolical at best. Not only did we have to navigate the large rocks and deep ruts, but also the twenty minutes’ of torrential rain, mud and steepness.

At least the ceremony we’d attend would be worth it. A fellow traveller best describes the events that unfolded:

“The ceremony is held in an enclosed dewan, which is much like my longhouse: made of split bamboo flooring and thatched bamboo walls, with rough tree trunk beams and a grass roof. From the ceiling hang bunches of broad green leaves.”

“From the darkness, one of the men chants the first line of his prayer, weaving his words to the beat of the bamboo. The women answer his prayer, repeating the line in unison, all the while making the beautiful percussive music with the bamboo. The man chants again, the chorus of women answer. Chant, two, three, four. One, two, three, four. Answer, two, three, four. One, two, three, four. And on and on. It is intoxicating.” ~~ Joe Byrnes.

 It’s this one ceremony that best explains kampung life. The simplicity of the people and the traditions they uphold make life out here very special.

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

The other side of Malaysia



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May 19, 2016



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Eco, Family, Food, Highlands, History, Homestay, Kelantan, Malaysia, National Parks, States



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By Lloyd Green

Like in any country, life away from the city is different. In rural Malaysia, village or kampung life is another beast. The Malays and Orang Asli here still practice their traditions, maintaining the old lifestyle of their people. It is completely different from the lifestyle in the city and you can see how different their life is.

To the locals it is more than just a home; it is a community where history and heritage lives on. From food, ceremonies and rituals to their connection and dependence on the land, there’s a sense of belonging — one not often found in the city.

Kampung life is sustained by agriculture; rice fields, fruit plantations, fishing and other types of farming. The family home in the kampung is well-kept and blends in with the surrounds of the village. Rambutan and rubber trees line the pathways with other types of vegetation providing shade from the harsh elements.

These shaded compounds are favourite places for school-yard games and social interaction as well as working areas. Attap and mat-weaving, drying, rice-pounding and carpentry are some of the common duties carried out. The space underneath each stilted house is also used to store food, fuel, building materials, farming equipment, bicycles and even cars.

De Visu / Shutterstock.com

Dense bushland and forest occupies the area surrounding these villages, with the echoes of children enjoying the cool waters of nearby rivers a welcome relief from the persistent horns of the city.

Our driver had turned down a narrow, sandy path past some neighbouring compounds, shacks and gardens, via the large lake that formed the focus of the kampung and towards a traditional styled home that stood resplendent between the trees. The 150-year-old structure had been given a splash of colour and was vibrant in pink and green.

We followed our guide past more wooden huts and through a muddy swamp until we found our night’s accommodation: A bamboo hut on the bank of the river, equipped with veranda and scenic views. The hospitality we received that night and in the morning was overwhelming.

Dozens of banana plantations dominate the valley. Pak Angah, a well known farmer show us his property. He sells each comb of his bananas for just over RM1. It’s enough to make around 300 ringgit per month.

the other side of malaysia 1

His children often accompany him in the picking of the bananas, as well as friends in the village. Much of the village operates this way. The husband leaves early in the morning to work on the land and the mother stays at home with the young children.

The kampung is eerily quiet during the day until the roaring engine of the school bus returns in the afternoon. Swarms of teenagers rush through the village yelling, running and laughing — their mothers often scolding at them to return home.

the other side of malaysia 2

The roads here connecting the kampungs to the highway vary in quality. At night and during rainy season they can be quite dangerous. One particular section of road we took was diabolical at best. Not only did we have to navigate the large rocks and deep ruts, but also the twenty minutes’ of torrential rain, mud and steepness.

At least the ceremony we’d attend would be worth it. A fellow traveller best describes the events that unfolded:

“The ceremony is held in an enclosed dewan, which is much like my longhouse: made of split bamboo flooring and thatched bamboo walls, with rough tree trunk beams and a grass roof. From the ceiling hang bunches of broad green leaves.”

“From the darkness, one of the men chants the first line of his prayer, weaving his words to the beat of the bamboo. The women answer his prayer, repeating the line in unison, all the while making the beautiful percussive music with the bamboo. The man chants again, the chorus of women answer. Chant, two, three, four. One, two, three, four. Answer, two, three, four. One, two, three, four. And on and on. It is intoxicating.” ~~ Joe Byrnes.

 It’s this one ceremony that best explains kampung life. The simplicity of the people and the traditions they uphold make life out here very special.

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