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Perhentian Islands

8 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD VISIT BACHOK

Take an amazing road trip on Federal Route 3 along the east coast of the country, and you will be passing scenic countryside, agricultural farms, and yonder, the azure blue of the South China Sea. Make a stop at Bachok at the edge of the sea where coconut trees sway peacefully in the breeze, and experience one of Malaysia’s best-kept secrets.

 

Malay woodcarving culture

Spend an afternoon at Akademi Nik Rashiddin (Nik Rashiddin Academy) for a thorough understanding of the Malay culture through its strong roots in traditional woodcarving.

 

The founder, the late Nik Rashiddin Nik Hussein, was an accomplished woodcarver who was passionate about the history of the region’s woodcarving traditions, particularly the Malay’s. The gallery is a treasure trove of valuable artefacts such as the traditional wooden Malay house and its architecture, Malay kris (dagger), bird cages, bird traps, traditional cake moulds, bed frames and more, all of which reflect the sophistication of the Malay culture. Special guided tours are available and, if lucky, are conducted by Nik Rashiddin’s widow, Rosnawati, who herself, is deeply knowledgeable on the subject.

 

You will leave the gallery awed and inspired by the brilliance of the Malay people whose deep affinity with nature was reflected in their highly astute sense of design and artistry.

 

Temple-hopping

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For a predominantly Muslim state, there sure are plenty of Buddhist temples around, but that’s due to Kelantan’s proximity to Thailand. In Bachok, make time to visit the Photikyan Phutthaktham temple famous for its 108-foot gleaming white standing Buddha statue which can be seen from miles away. A pair of colourful dragons framing the entrance welcomes visitors to this temple. Other sights at the temple include the wishing three, where devotees throw colourful ribbons of wishes onto its branches, and the seated Buddha image behind a seven-headed dragon.

 

The call of the sea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bachok’s seaside attraction is Pantai Irama, or the Beach of Melody, so-named due to the lulling call of the wind and waves as it hits the shore. It’s a major gathering place for the locals over the weekends (the east coast states consider Fridays and Saturdays as the weekends) so it’s the perfect place to get into the local action. Expect to see lots of activities then, such as banana boat rides, kite flying, fishing and such. Pack a picnic, light a barbecue or get snacks from the nearby vendors, and just chill with your feet in the sea – highly therapeutic! It faces the South China Sea and gets some fierce waves during the monsoon season (usually from November to March), so swimming is not advisable then.

 

Jetty to yonder!

Planning to visit the Perhentian Islands nearby? Bachok is a great place to put up the night before you make the 30-minute journey to Kuala Besut where boats await to speed you off to the twin tropical paradise islands. Tip: get the earliest boats in the morning before the waves get choppy.

 

Kelantan delicacies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kelantan food is quite different from what you get in the west coast cities. Here, rice is a big thing, especially eaten for breakfast. There’s even a local festival that celebrates the 101 types of rice dishes in Kelantan. In Bachok, it’s easy to find a variety of rice dishes including nasi dagang, nasi berlauk, nasi tumpang and nasi kerabu. At tea time, don’t forget to order a nice cup of hot, sweetened tea to go along with the glutinous rice eaten with freshly-grilled fish, a real delicacy here. And if possible, always go for the seafood; fishing is one of the main economic activities of those living on the east coast, and you are always guaranteed to get the freshest catch of the day! Our favourite? The etok salai, freshwater shellfish that’s beautifully smoked with local herbs and spices to bring out its best flavours.

 

A history lesson

Bachok was one of the first landing points of the Japanese army when it invaded then-Malaya in 1941. A visit here would be an insightful experience for history buffs of how the war was fought between the British Indian Army and the Empire of Japan on the east coast.

 

The Nami Island of Kelantan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Instagrammers on the lookout for unique landscapes that capture the social media world’s imagination will not be disappointed with what Senok Beach has to offer. This beachside locale is a stretch of land where pine trees stand erect in neat rows, their pines needles catching in the gentle breeze. It’s a favourite spot not only for selfies and wefies, but also to commemorate special occasions such as weddings and graduation forever. The backdrop of the sea and the pine trees make a natural landscape for memories you want to keep.

 

The clay-makers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kelantan is one of the main producers of singgora tiles – hand-produced thin clay tiles used on the roofs of many traditional wooden homes in the east coast. These tiles are favoured here due to the cooling qualities of clay and its ability to reduce indoor temperatures naturally.

 

The singgora tiles workshop (which can be visited) run by these two elderly ladies – Madam Noraini and Madam Natrah – are said to be the only one left in the entire of Malaysia.

 

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BuBu Villa, Perhentian Island: Entrapped… in Paradise

Our exclusive complex of 18 villas is ideally located towards the southern end of Long Beach on Pulau Perhentian Kecil – the best beach in the Perhentian Islands, and arguably in all of Malaysia. At BuBu Villa you are within easy reach not just of the golden sands and clear blue waters of Long Beach, but also of a range of restaurants, bars, dive centres and more.

BuBu Villas offers an oasis of peace and relaxation. Enter our secluded complex from the beach, and you are in your own private world – something other hotels in Perhentian cannot match. Sit in your own private walled front garden and relax or play games with the family. Enjoy a café latte, cocktail, snack or meal in our Italian-themed restaurant, the World Café. Venture out again to take advantage of our dedicated sunbeds and straw parasols, or to splash or swim in the nearby clear blue waters. Lively or relaxed, or a mixture of both – the choice is yours.

All our villas have their own independently controllable ACs and en suite bathrooms. Twin Villas and Family Villas can accommodate up to four people (one double and two single beds), while our Beach Villas and Garden Villas are ideal for couples.

 

HOW TO GET THERE

By Air

Nearest airport is the Sultan Ismail Petra Airport in Kota Bharu. Car transfer from the airport to Kuala Besut Jetty would take approximately 45 minutes.

By Land

Guests arriving at the Kuala Besut Jetty will be transferred to the Resort by speed boat. Distances and travel time estimates from major locations:

  • Kuala Lumpur: 460km, 6 hours 30 minutes
  • Penang: 356km, 5 hours 30 minutes
  • Taman Negara: 488km, 6 hours
  • Cameron Highlands: 308km, 5 hours
  • Singapore: 672km, 8 hours 30 minutes

 

By Sea

Journey time from Kuala Besut Jetty to the Resort is approximately 30 minutes

 

ACCOMMODATION

  • 4 Beach Villas, 70 square meters Villa Facilities – Air Conditioning Ceiling Fan, Bathrobes
  • 10 Garden Villas, 60 square meters Bathroom Amenities, Hair Dryer, Bath Towels
  • 2 Family Villas, 90 square meters Hot Water Shower, In-room Electronic Deposit Safe Box
  • 2 Twin Villas, 90 square meters

 

 

FACILITIES AND SERVICES

  • Airport Transfer
  • Speed Boat Transfer
  • Water Taxi Service
  • Massage
  • Sun Lounger
  • Beach Terrace
  • Baby Cot (upon request, check with reception)
  • Laundry Services (upon request, check with reception)
  • Kuala Besut Jetty Meet Greet Services
  • Complimentary Wi-Fi Internet (in selected areas)

 

DINING

The World Café Its attractive circular roof and al fresco design, is the dedicated restaurant for BuBu Villa. Situated at the entrance to our exclusive secluded villa complex, the World Café has an enviable location looking right onto the powdery white sand of Long Beach.

The World Café’s a la carte menu is distinctively Italian – hardly surprising, since we have a genuine Italian chef. At the same time, it draws on Asian and other international influences to produce a varied menu that will satisfy any discerning palate.

Open for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner. Seats a maximum of 100 persons.

 

RECREATION FACILITIES

  • Beach Volleyball
  • Canoeing
  • Island Hopping
  • Snorkelling
  • Sunset Cruise/ Round Island Cruise
  • Fishing Trip
  • Hybrid Station Trail/ Jungle Trekking
  • Beach Wedding Ceremony/ Event
  • Diving (by appointment)

 

 

 

INFORMATION

BuBu Resort Sdn. Bhd. (Company No: 536204-P)

Kuala Lumpur Sales Office:

G-1, Ground Floor, Wisma SPS, No. 32 Jalan Imbi, 55100 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Tel: +603-2142 6688

Fax: +603-2141 0080

Email: [email protected]

Website: www.buburesort.com

 

BuBu Villa

Long Beach, Perhentian Island, Terengganu, Malaysia.

Tel: +6016-260 3548

 

* All image credit to www.buburesort.com

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Secret Beaches of Malaysia

Written by Aura Farrando

Perhentian Islands, Tioman Island, Langkawi and Penang are popular destinations for a reason. They offer everything a beach lover wants. But for those who are after a bit more adventure, something off the beaten track or just an escape from resort beach lifestyle, we’ve compiled a list of the best hidden treasures of Malaysia.

Pulau Mabul

Pulau Mabul or Mabul Island is a small island off the southeast coast of Sabah – just 15km away from Sipadan. There’s a fishing village, no cars, no roads and perhaps some of the best muck diving in the world. You can even circumnavigate it on foot! The beaches here are pristine and a perfect place to unwind after a long day snorkeling or diving. If you are lucky you will even catch some turtles laying their eggs on the beach.

Getting there: Take a boat from Semporna to Pulau Mabul. Speedboats are around 30 minutes, while ferries take about one and a half hours.

Locals enjoying the pristine sand of Pulau Mabul. Image: http://www.projectaware.org/blog/scuba-junkie/oct-07-11/mabul-marine-week-2011a-job-well-done

Locals enjoying the pristine sand of Pulau Mabul. Image: http://www.projectaware.org/blog/scuba-junkie/oct-07-11/mabul-marine-week-2011a-job-well-done

Pulau Tiga

Pulau Tiga is so wild that it was once used as the setting for reality show Survivor. It is a relatively young island; in 1897, an earthquake in the Philippines caused a volcanic eruption in Borneo to form new land. It’s no surprise then that Pulau Tiga is famous for its volcanic mud baths. On top of that, there’s kilometres of white sandy beach to enjoy. A hike around the island is a great way to see its native flora and fauna.

Getting there: Catch a 30-minute boat from Kuala Penyu, Kota Kinabalu or Labuan.

The mud baths in Pulau Tiga are great for your skin. Image: http://aroundtheworldwithjustin.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/IMG_2380_new.jpg

The mud baths in Pulau Tiga are great for your skin. Image: http://aroundtheworldwithjustin.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/IMG_2380_new.jpg

Bukit Keluang

Can’t decide between the mountain and the beach? Get a taste of both at this tiny cove off Terengganu, close to the Kuala Besut jetty where you’ll see droves of people lining up to head to the Perhentian Islands. Bukit Keluang is a perfect match of pristine white sand, beautiful sea breeze and breathtaking mountains where you can explore beach caves, go windsurfing, kayaking or simply relax with your family at the resort. Be sure to head up the escarpment each morning to catch the amazing sunrise. What a view!

Getting there: Accessible by car from Kota Bharu, Kuala Besut, Kuala Terengganu and Kampung Teras.

The picturesque coastline of Bukit Keluang. Image: https://anotherguywithcamera.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/the-shoreline.jpg

The picturesque coastline of Bukit Keluang. Image: https://anotherguywithcamera.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/the-shoreline.jpg

Pulau Kapas

Known as Cotton Island due its white, soft sand and crystal, clear blue water, Pulau Kapas is like a scene out of a movie — but 100 times better. With a designated marine park protecting its waters, Pulau Kapas is the perfect place for snorkeling or dive deep to enjoy the coral reef that surrounds the island. If that’s not for you, then just sit back and relax in style under a palm tree.

Getting there: Take a ferry from Marang, located 45 minutes from Terengganu.

They don’t call it Cotton Island for no reason. Image: https://c1.staticflickr.com/6/5522/9262235120_7f68dcf2d6_b.jpg

They don’t call it Cotton Island for no reason. Image: https://c1.staticflickr.com/6/5522/9262235120_7f68dcf2d6_b.jpg

Pulau Tinggi

If Pulau Tioman seems too mainstream for you, visit Pulau Tinggi off the Johor coast. It only has 500 inhabitants and is quite laid back. It is ideal for relaxing holidays and family vacations or can double up an adventure haven, perfect for snorkeling, trekking and canoeing. The beaches are less manicured, but more natural and idyllic.

Getting there: Just a 45-minute boat from Mersing in the state of Johor.

Allow yourself to escape into another world. Image: http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-TLkxUzOtKTU/U5mYX1y2owI/AAAAAAAAAsQ/pJD_Agv5s74/s1600/IMG_6881.jpg

Allow yourself to escape into another world. Image: http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-TLkxUzOtKTU/U5mYX1y2owI/AAAAAAAAAsQ/pJD_Agv5s74/s1600/IMG_6881.jpg

Pulau Sibu

Here you’ll find not one, but four charming islands: Pulau Sibu Besar, Pulau Sibu Tengah, Pulau Kukus and Pulau Sibu Hujung. The main isle is just 6km long and 1km wide, with thick vegetation and secluded beaches dominating the landscape. It’s not the easiest to access, but that’s the price you pay for heaven on earth. You’ll also most likely have the whole place to yourself.

Getting there: Arrange a boat transfer from the small town of Tanjung Leman, 130km from Johor Bahru. There’s no direct bus from Johor to Tanjung Leman, so we highly recommend you to get the hotel in Johor Bahru or Singapore to arrange a shuttle bus or minivan for you.

Photo by Peter D. Kennett

Photo by Peter D. Kennett

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Unique luxury resorts of Malaysia

The Datai, Langkawi

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There are a number of luxury resorts on Pulau langkawi that can offer a great hideaway for you and your loved one. One of the finest of these is The Datai Resort which epitomises all that’s great about Langkawi.

As well as being nestled in the heart of the rainforest, the resort also overlooks the tranquil Datai Bay, one of the top beaches in the world as voted by National Geographic, leaving you with a choice of environments to relax in.

 

Pangkor Laut Resort, Pangkor Laut

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If it’s seclusion you’re looking for, you can’t get much better than Pangkor Laut Island. As there is only one resort on this island, it exudes exclusivity and makes an ideal location for some quality rest and relaxation.

In the sanctuary of this privately owned island, you have the secluded beaches and virgin rainforest all to yourselves. The resort has been sensitively developed to cover only a fraction of the island’s 300 acres so you can embrace the raw natural beauty of this idyllic setting.

The rooms come in a variety of styles including villas nestled in to the hills, chalets perched on stilts stretching out over the ocean, and character filled 2-4 bedroom private estates that harp back to the British colonial days of old Malaya.

 

The Lakehouse, Cameron Highlands

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Set in stunningly lush grounds, this Tudor-style boutique resort radiates old English charm. The immaculately groomed gardens and distinctive Tudor décor make this an ideal spot to escape the hustle and bustle of modern life.

Enjoy refreshments on the terrace overlooking the Sultan Abu Bakar Lake and, to completely immerse yourself in the British theme, indulge in an afternoon tea of scones, jam and clotted cream.

Once you’re done exploring the beautiful surrounding hills for the day, snuggle up in front of the log fireplace in the antique filled lounge or retire to your romantic suite, complete with sunken bath, walk in wardrobe, and four-poster bed.

 

Cheong Fatt Tze Mansion, Penang

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For a touch of history, head to Penang and the famous Blue Mansion hotel in Georgetown.

This 19th century grand estate was once home to one of China’s wealthiest tycoons but is now converted into a four star hotel comprising of 18 suites. It has been showered with awards for its impressive architecture and delicate restoration, making it a striking and unique place to spend a few nights.

 

Bubu Resort Villas, Perhentian

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Situated off the coast of Terengganu, the Perhentian Islands are considered some of the finest islands Malaysia has to offer. Still relatively untouched, this collection of tiny islands captures nature in its purest form. These islands can only be reached by speedboat which helps the area to preserve its unspoilt environment.

The smaller of the two main islands, Pulau Perhentian Kecil, retains its picturesque feel with a complete lack of roads and limited beach development. It also boasts some of the best snorkelling spots in Malaysia. Here you have the luxury of going right off the sandy shores or alternatively catch one of the boat tours out to some of the more spectacular sites. Turtles and sharks are almost a guarantee in this area so keep your eyes peeled!

Bubu Resort and Villas, located on Long Beach, is a great place to enjoy this natural beauty. The rustic feel of the island and its surrounding nature offers up the dream desert island experience.

 

 

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A budget guide to travelling Malaysia

By Lloyd Green

Okay, if you’re coming to Malaysia to spend two weeks in Kuala Lumpur, Langkawi and the Perhentian Islands, you’re probably not going to do it on the cheap. But there’s also plenty of people who pass through Malaysia on their way north from Singapore en route to Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam.

For these people, every dime is important and in a city like KL where extravagance is flashed in your face on every corner, finding things suited to your budget can be difficult. This also applies to travelling across Malaysia, with knowledge of how and when to travel, important to your attempts at saving money.

So let’s start with your arrival.

If, like most people, you arrive in Malaysia by air at either KLIA or KLIA2 terminals and have booked accommodation in Kuala Lumpur, you will have a few options of varying cost and duration to reach your destination. Often backpackers fly blind during this process and can waste money without even knowing it. The KLIA Express train is the fastest way to and from the KLIA airports from KL Sentral, but it is not the cheapest.

shutterstock_209459323 (Picture by Sorbis / Shutterstock.com)

The cheapest route to Kuala Lumpur is by bus with a one-way ticket for adults from KLIA or KLIA2 terminals to KL Sentral priced at 10 Ringgit. Peak hour traffic in Kuala Lumpur can cause lengthy delays, so if you are on a tight schedule and want to get to the city as soon as possible, KLIA Express train is the best option. It takes 28 minutes and is RM55. If you want to save five Ringgit make sure you pay with your credit card at the kiosk and not at the counter. It will be RM50.

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(Picture by Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com)

In terms of accommodation, there are two main places to stay for backpackers; Changkat in Bukit Bintang and Chinatown not far from Pasar Seni LRT station. There’s a host of backpacker accommodation in both areas with single rooms as cheap as RM40-50 and dorms beds priced at around 20 Ringgit. Of course, the quality of your hostel will vary with price. Changkat is closer to KL’s nightlife, KLCC and the Petronas Twin Towers, but Chinatown is more conveniently located near the city’s main transportation hub — KL Sentral. Many coaches to Malacca, Johor Bahru, Penang and Ipoh now leave from TBS bus station, which is approximately 20 minutes from KL Sentral.

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Jalan Alor off Changkat is foodie-central with Chinese seafood restaurants and hawker stalls selling an array of local delicacies and international cuisines until the wee hours of the morning. Petaling Street in Chinatown is also famous for food with its night market chock-full of shops and stalls selling goods and street food. Be aware, both of these areas are aimed at tourists and as such prices can be inflated.

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(Picture by Calvin Chan / Shutterstock.com)

Most of KL’s main attractions are aimed at families, couples and those who are dazzled by the bright lights, so if you prefer a bit of adventure but want to stay within in the perimeters of the city I suggest you check out Petaling Jaya and in particular areas such as Subang where an urban youth culture has evolved. If you are able to make friends with locals, that’s even better and ask them to take you out of KL City. The food in areas such as Klang, Petaling Jaya, Ampang and Cheras is just as good (and cheaper) and is where most of the locals eat. Also keep an eye out for local night markets known as Pasar Malam. They offer amazing delicacies and fresh produce and are more authentic than the ones in the city. If you want a quiet night at the cinema, Wednesday is the cheapest evening with tickets as cheap as 10 to 12 Ringgit.

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Just a stones throw away from KL are a places such as Chilling Falls and Broga Hill. These are quite popular amongst locals and provide a nice respite from the concrete jungle of the city. They are free and relatively easy to get to by car. Check out the best places for hiking, camping and waterfalls in and around Kuala Lumpur here.

Budget guide 3(Picture by Travelblog.com)

The bus and train are the cheapest options for making your way around Peninsular Malaysia. For Ipoh, catch the rain as Ipoh Railway Station is located in the centre of town, whereas the coach terminal is some 15 minutes away. You will only save five Ringgit if you catch the bus. The bus from KL to Penang is the best option as it takes you directly to the island and within five minutes of George Town. If you want relax on Malaysia’s famed beaches like Langkawi and the Perhentian Islands, the bus and ferry is the way to go.

shutterstock_115589299For those interested in checking out Borneo’s wildlife, make sure you book your flights to Kuching and Kota Kinabalu in advance as flights to East Malaysia can be expensive.

Strangely, food prices also vary between Sarawak, Sabah and Peninsular Malaysia with Indian food slightly more pricier in Borneo. Popular music festivals such the Rainforest World Music Festival in Sarawak and the Penang Jazz Festival on the mainland are relatively cheap compared to other international events, but again book in advance to save yourself some cash.

A great, inexpensive way to see Malaysia is to volunteer. Malaysia offers volunteering opportunities for every taste and interest: from wildlife projects in the untamed jungle of Borneo to teaching English to children in urban and rural environments. Most places provide free accommodation and sometimes food and you’ll have access to remote communities you probably never knew existed. Read more here.

When exiting Malaysia, consider the bus trip north to Hat Yai in Thailand. It is less than 60 Ringgit and you can split the journey up by stopping over in Penang for the night. Cheap flights from KL to popular tourist destinations in Asia such as Vietnam, Indonesia and Philippines can be found via Air Asia, but any additional items such as luggage over 20 kilograms can increase the price.

In summary, Malaysia is a wonderful place to explore and the more adventurous you are, the better your experience will be. Doing it on the cheap is possible but having a friend to show you around or give you advice definitely helps with your budget.

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