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Getting around Melaka

Overview
getting-around-melaka2

As any other historical city, Malacca is very interesting, original and special. It offers delicious local cuisine, amazing attraction places and many astonishing photo shoot points. No matter how curious or eager you can be, this state will fulfill your whims. If you choose Malacca as your tourist destination you won’t be disappointed. As soon as you reached this city, don’t waste your time, just find a conveyance and explore, learn, eat, drink, have fun and feel Melaka.

Whether you are travelling alone, as a couple or in a group, the best way to get around the prime of Malacca is on foot. First of all visit Baba-Nyonya Heritage Museum and Malacca Sultanate Palace Museum. These 2 places will tell you everything about Malaccan history. It is very important to know its past. The good part about Melaka is almost 70% of the major attractions are within 1km radius. There is no better way to have a good feel about Melaka by walking. It’s also a good free way to burn calorie without too exhausted.

If you are running out of time, rent a bicycle or join a cycling tour group. Some hotels offer bicycle rental for their guests. Each corner in Malacca denotes history, but at the same time, it is a modern city. The drawback of cycling within the city area is there is limited tracks for bicycle so sharing roads with cars and buses may become a bit dangerous. Also, do take note that some attractions in the hill side like St. Paul’s Hill are not reachable in bike.

When you reached Malacca River, try to look for Muara Jetty, which is next to Quayside Heritage Centre. This is the where the river cruise journey starts. In the 45-min sightseeing tour, you’ll cruise past historic buildings, old warehouses(godowns) and graffiti art on the buildings. Melaka River Cruise is one of the best ways to see the city’s beauty. If you haven’t got enough of the river view, pick a restaurant by the river and see how the environment changes color when the sky turns dark.

An unusual transport within Melaka is a trishaw. It is a small vehicle with a pedal and three wheels. You can find them at the Dutch Square. This non-pollute vehicle driver and at the same time guide, will acquaint you with every touristic point in the city.

No doubt a car is the faster way to explore a city. For most visitors who wants to explore Melaka outside the prime city area, hail for a taxi and the driver will take you anywhere you want. If you prefer chartered taxi services, they are available at the end of Jalan Kee Ann. A taxi can carry up to 4 passengers. As most taxi drivers don’t use meter, it is best to negotiate the price before hopping in the taxi. You are being ripped off if a ride less than 5 mins is charged RM15. A personal car is the most convenient vehicle. You have everything you may need at hand, especially when you travel with kids.

Any transport vehicle you choose will help you to explore the beautiful and unique Malacca.


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2 Responses to Getting around Melaka

  1. Anne Liltved says:

    I have tried to find a bus from Malacca to Mersing on July 8, but it seems as if they are all fully booked. Could it still be a chance to find bus transport or do we need to take a taxi (family of five)?

    • Go Admin says:

      You may want to search for the bus availability at Easybook and see if you can secure the seats. If bus transport is not possible, taking a taxi is an option.


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CRUISING DOWN VENICE OF THE EAST

Go: Cruising down Venice of the East
2011/11/09
PHILIP LIM
[email protected]

The history of Malacca is about 700 years, perhaps older. PHILIP LIM goes on a river cruise and enjoys vistas of the ancient and modern

IF you are new to Malacca, one of the most pleasant ways of getting acquainted with the Unesco World Heritage Site (since 2008) is to take a river cruise.

I have been an absentee local visitor for the past 11 years. So a revisit to the city was long overdue. A friend told me that one of the nicest attractions in Malacca at present is to board a boat from the Quayside Heritage Centre and take a 45-minute cruise of Malacca River.

Much has happened in the years between the time when the river was an eyesore and it’s in fairly pristine condition now.

It has been about six years since the Malacca River was given a makeover and its murky waters had been treated and rendered visually presentable. The river boat jetty took about two years to complete.

A la Venice

The time spent on the boat is equivalent to a cruise along any of the big rivers in Europe. It is not a coincidence that Malacca in its golden era was nicknamed the Venice of the East.

The only difference is the temperature. The Malaysian weather on the day of our river boat trip is almost perfect.

The sky is a clear blue with only traces of clouds drifting above. There’s a gentle wind which caresses our cheeks as the boat skims the surface of the calm waters.

At last count, there are 26 river boats cruising the Malacca River ferrying passengers across a distance of about nine kilometres. These fibreglass boats are capable of sailing beneath the numerous bridges even at high tides.

At its lowest, the tide is still 0.8 metres which is manageable by the river boats.

A visual count during the river cruise reveals the presence of eight bridges.

They are Tan Kim Seng, Chan Koon Cheng (Ghostbridge of Malacca), Hang Tuah, Hang Jebat, Kampung Jawa, Kampung Morten, Old Bus Station and Pasar.

The river route has been deliberately designed and engineered for visitors to catch glimpses of river bank flower gardens, a Malay kampung, a windmill, a fort and the Christ Church of Malacca.

Excited cruisers
With us on the boat tour is a family of 10 tourists. They are quite enthusiastic and animated vocally at the novelty of seeing so many unfamiliar scenes outside their country.

Their loud conversations in Cantonese only add to the merriment of the occasion. At one stage of the cruise, the boatman spots a 150cm long monitor lizard lazing on a mangrove branch near the water edge.

One woman loudly exclaims in Cantonese: “This is so big, not even a family of 10 can finish it on the dining table!”

Those of us who understand her can only smile nervously. There are two young Caucasian women on board the boat as well. It would have been interesting to watch their reaction if they had understood the comment.

As far as I am concerned, it is the monitor lizard’s lucky day. It could have been born in another country, lived on another river and might have suffered the unfortunate fate of being the main course on a distant family’s evening menu.

A therapy of sort
The last boat ride ends around 11.30pm. A night cruise along the river is an exhilarating experience altogether because passengers can soak in the sights and sounds of a nocturnal Malacca.

Many of the trees lining the river cruise route are decorated with lights and the old buildings and ancient structures exude an aura that tell of bygone days that once made the city one of the busiest trading ports for hundreds of years.

The human body is susceptible to the lull of lapping waves and the concrete attractions by the river side at every turn and corner give your entire being a sense of high.

The Malacca River cruise is scheduled at a 30-minute interval beginning from 9.30am. Adult fare is RM10 and for children below 12 years, it is RM5. If you are organising a group tour, the Malacca River Cruise office can make arrangements for RM100 per boat.

Call 06-281 7322.

Fast Facts
Before the 15th Century, Malacca was just an ordinary fishing village. It began to flourish under the reign of Iskandar Shah (Parameswara). Before long, Arab traders began to call on the port city.

In the mid-15th Century, Chinese Muslim Admiral Cheng Ho paid a courtesy call on Malacca. According to historical records, Malacca soon became a vassal State of Ming China.

In 1511, the Portuguese seized Malacca and brought it under their control. One hundred thirty years would pass before the Dutch mounted an attack on Malacca and ousted the Portuguese. The year 1641 marked the beginning of the Dutch rule.

For the next 150 years, the Dutch presence in Malacca was supreme. In 1795, Holland (Netherlands) was conquered by the French and consequently the Dutch lost control of Malacca.

The Dutch absence was soon replaced by the British who took over after the Anglo-Dutch Treaty of 1824.

Malacca was first governed by the British East India Company. It was only later that it became a British Crown Colony. Together with Singapore and Penang, Malacca became part of the British Straits Settlements.

Read more: Go: Cruising down Venice of the East http://www.nst.com.my/nst/articles/Go_CruisingdownVeniceoftheEast/Article#ixzz1dGni1IT6

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