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Reasons why you should move to Malacca

Buying Property Malacca


Real estate has become among the top investments in the world today. Among the places to look out for are in Southeast Asia, where you can buy a house in Malaysia. Malacca is a quick fix to all those who love traveling since it has been described as a tourist destination. It provides an experience travelers cannot get anywhere else.

==Rich History==

The Malacca museums have been a tourist attraction site for the longest time. They vary from Peranakan heritage to colonial and unique museums. A close look at the archives gives visitors a unique opportunity to learn about the Malacca history as well as enjoy the sites the museums have to offer. Apart from the history and the sites, one can also look at the extensive collections of artifacts lined up at the Aborigines, Maritime, Kite, Baba Nyonya, Straits Chinese Jewellery, Malaysia Prison, Heritage, People’s, Toy and the Submarine Museum, all in Malacca.

Other than enjoying the beautiful sites, Malacca is about sharing the Malaysia history. Malacca, described as the home of historical heritage, has played a vital role in the Malaysia history in that it was the first entry point for colonialists during the old war and has been listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Among the primary historical sites are the Peranakan and the colonial heritage sites.


A variety of places worth exploring is the Christ Church Melaka, Famosa Fort, and St Peter’s Church, built in 1710 by Portuguese Catholics, Cheng Hoon Teng Temple, the Dutch Square, Queen Victoria Memorial Fountain, The Stadthuys and St Paul’s Hills.

St Peter’s Church is the oldest in the country and was completed during the Dutch administration. Old as it may be, services are still conducted in the church halls. A bell at St Peter’s is evidence it was built in the 17th century as well as a Christ alabaster statue.

Other historical buildings in Malacca include the Syed Al Attas Mansion, which reminds one of the Malacca Muslim rules. It is reflective of the Muslim lifestyle as practiced during that era.

==Chinatown Street in Malacca==

There are other places worth visiting in Malacca, such as the Jonker Street. It may be equated to the Chinatown Street, also called by locals ‘Jalan Jang Hebat’. What stands out at Jonker is the Malacca River, which makes the scene even more vibrant. The Heeren Street near Jonker Street has been listed among the top must-see destinations in Malacca.

Visitors are mostly attracted by the buildings that have today been transformed into old joints and famous restaurants. These are places that were once occupied by rich Malacca families and was therefore referred to as the Millionaires’ Row. The street that was once only covered by the rich is now open for everyone, rich or not.

The street is full of shop houses on either side, which gives travelers a feel of the 17th Century. The shop houses are sometimes used as textile shops, food courts, souvenir outlets and antique kiosks. During the weekends, visitors are encouraged to taste the local food and join the bargain battle with the vendors out to make profits against the visitors’ wishes to fetch the lowest prices.

==Affordable Hotel with Quality Service==

Your visit will not be memorable (for all the right reasons) if your stay is almost uncomfortable. Ensure you book the best Malacca hotel that exhibits the classic themes of the region. Such hotels are readily available, and the cost varies from low-budget to high-profile expenses. They include Casa del Rio Melaka and The Majestic Malacca in the high-end category.

The budget options are such as Layang-Layang Guest House, Gingerflower Boutique Hotel, Hotel Da Som Inn and Imperial Heritage Melaka. The hotels are keen on keeping a good reputation seeing as the business depends on word on the street from the travelers.

What is more attractive about Malacca is the people and their rich ethnicity. The communities have blended into one rich culture full of diversity. Visitors are welcome to be part of the diversification and live in peaceful co-existence with the Malacca people. The river cuts through Malacca to the Malacca Straits. There are motorboats in the river that give an opportunity for sightseeing.

The Malacca River Cruise, for instance, lasts about 45 minutes, giving riders the chance to take in all the fantastic views Malacca has to offer, at a fee of RM10 for adults and RM5 for children, especially holders of Mycard. For foreigners, the charges will attract an additional RM5. Visitors need not worry about missing the cruise as it is open from 9am-12am. The night cruise is far more enjoyable because of the riverside punctuated by the lights.

==Preferred Destination For Foodies==

Malacca is not only about the history and the buildings, but it is also about quality food served in top-notch restaurants. Located on Jonker Street, Nancy’s Kitchen offers the delicious Nyonya cuisine. The interior design has a feel of a home or the familiar neighborhood that reminds you of your kitchen. It is mostly preferred because it serves hot dishes. The only problem is that the food is not Halal, which means Muslims are locked out.

The other restaurant worth exploring is the Capitol, which is not only affordable but also ranked among the best in Malacca. This explains why it is always flooded with customers. There is a variety of almost 80 vegetables and seafood dishes, which explains the long queues that are a constant feature of Capitol.

Meanwhile, The Baboon House keeps visitors enjoying their food while sitting in an open courtyard. This arrangement takes advantage of the vast space that is brought to life by the modern furniture. What makes it feel more at home is the presence of the owner’s cat and dog. Baboon House serves American dishes.

==The Malacca Nightlife==

Malacca’s GoGo KTV Lounge is famous because of its jetty shape. It is located between Mahkota Melaka and the Holiday Inn Melaka. Although it is small, it has a variety of punch flavors that are bound to keep guests entertained, if not the punch, then the number of TV on the walls will.

Related Article: Top 20 things to do in Malacca

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Top 10 Historical Places to Visit in Melaka (Malacca)

A Famosa Fort Melaka


Melaka is a small state of Malaysia that covers not more than 1,664 km² area. This small state with population of around 800,000 in 2010 offers great hospitality to the visitors. You will find plenty of tourist attractions, best restaurants and shopping places here, but let us now introduce you to the aspect of Melaka that made it one of the world heritage sites of UNESCO. There are plenty of places to visit in Melaka that attract tourists, especially those interested in heritage history.

Top 10 Historical places to visit in Melaka

Melaka has been ruled by Portuguese, Dutch, British Japanese and every ruler has left their mark in the city. It is also strategically located on the straits of Malacca, which is the third largest strait in the world.

Here is our hand picked top 10 places to visit in Melaka with historical background. Read on as you will find it handy when in Melaka.


1. St Paul’s Hill

The St Paul’s Hill is surrounded by a lot of historical places and restaurants. You have to climb up the hill to see the St Paul’s Church which is one of the great historical places of the city and country. The Church was first constructed in 1521. The Church is today part of Malacca Museum Complex. The building was just a chapel in 1521, which the Christians of that time dedicated to the Virgin Mary. In the end of the sixteenth century the Church was renamed Igreja de Madre de Deus.

Due to rich heritage St Paul’s Hill is on the top among 10 best places to visit in Melaka.

2. St Peter’s Church

The St Peter’s Church was built in 1710 by the Portuguese Catholics. The building was completed in the Dutch reign. Being a world heritage site, it is the oldest Catholic Church in the country. People still visit the Church and attend sermons in the big halls. There is a bell in the Church that mentions that the building was erected in early seventeenth century. Do visit this historical place, you will also find an alabaster statue of the Christ.

3. Christ Church Melaka

A little younger than the other historical Churches in Melaka, the Christ Church was built in 1753. It is the Protestant Church located just near the St. Paul Hill. Captain of the Malacca Burghers, Abraham de Wind laid the foundation stone of the Church. It took around 12 years to complete the Church. After the completion of this Church, it became the primary Dutch Converted Church in Dutch Malacca replacing the Bovenkerk. The Red building adds to the elegance of the environment around even today.

Christ Church Melaka is in the city center which is best known as red square. You will not miss this among other places to visit in Melaka.

Read more about Christ Church Melaka

Places to visit in Melaka

4. Syed Al Attas Mansion

This building reminds of the Muslim rule in Malacca. The Syed Al Attas Mansion was the building owned by Syed Mohammad Al Attas who was a Muslim opponent of the Dutch in late 1800. Today, the place serves as the Penang Islamic Museum. You may visit the museum between 9:30 am to 6:00 pm any day other than Tuesday. The place reflects the lifestyle of the Muslim rules of that time.

5. Heeren Street

The Heeren Street is located just near the Jonker Street in Melaka but it’s importance still stand. This place is one of the most important roads. The visitors to the Jonker Walk also visit this place and visitors especially come here to see how some of the residential use buildings were converted to the finest restaurants and historical places. The place was once inhabited by the richest Malaccan families. Thus, it was famous as the “Millionaires’ Row”. Walk in the Heeren Street and be glad since you are lucky enough to visit the place that once welcomed only the richest.

The simplicty of Heeren street is unique so keep this among your places to visit in Melaka list.

Read more about Heeren Street Melaka

6. The Stadthuys

In the cluster of historical places in Malacca, the Stadthuys is also counted. The name of the place is a Dutch word that means a city hall. The buildings in the place are painted red, thus it is also known as the Red Square. This is the place connected to almost all parts of the city and you can call it the heart of Malacca Town. The Dutch Governor of Malacca built it in 1650. The Stadthuys is reserved as a Museum of History and Ethnography today. The place stores some of traditional costumes and artifacts that remind you of history of Malacca.

Read more about Stadthuys Melaka

7. Cheng Hoon Teng Chinese Temple

The Cheng Hoon Teng temple or “Temple of Green Cloud” reminds of the Chinese architecture in Malacca. The Chinese used to practice three Doctrines here including Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism. The Cheng Hoon Teng Temple is one of oldest functioning temple in Malaysia. Just near the Harmony Street, the Temple covers 4,600 m² area which is beautifully decorated. There is also a 7 meter pole that has a red flag with names of three captains.

For a unique experience, keep this temple among the list of places to visit in Melaka.

Read more about Cheng Hoon Teng Chinese Temple

8. Queen Victoria Memorial Fountain

In the Stadthuys, there is a Queen Victoria Memorial Fountain that serves as a central place from where you can visit almost all the historical places of the city. The Queen Victoria Regina date mentioned on the fountain is 1837 to 1901. Almost every tourist to Melaka likes to have a photo by this fountain since it is both beautiful and historical. Getting here early is the key else you might have to get in a queue to take a picture in front of the fountain.

9. Dutch Square

The Dutch Square and Queen Victoria Memorial Fountain are located at a same place. The Dutch Square or the Malacca Town Square is monument of the British administration that was built in the mid of 17th century , and the Dutch lined it with the main townhouse, or Stadthuys, along with the Dutch Reformed Church, now called Christ Church.The red buildings in the square look great in the night lights.

Read more about Dutch Square

10. Tan Kim Seng Bridge Melaka

On the River Melaka, the Tan Kim Seng Bridge is most famous as well as important. There was a rich Chinese trader and philanthropist in 19th century after whom the bridge is named. He donated the bridge to the town. Tan Kim donated bridge as well as land for Chinese cemetery to the town. You can find the bridge near Clock tower.

The unique aspect of Melaka is preservance of heritage sites to date. I hope you find top 10 historical places to visit in Melaka list handy. If you want to suggest a place then please feel free to add below in comments. If you’re traveling in Malaysia and would like to know best places to visit, below are some of the recommended guides:

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Melaka Art & Performance Festival

Melaka Art Performance Festival

MAPFest is building a clever repute for bringing heading Malaysian, Australian and general artists together in performances and exhibitions via Melaka’s overwhelming birthright precinct, including a stately hull of St Paul’s Church. Festival events are giveaway to all, and attract thousands of spectators.

Venue
All around Melaka

Organiser:
E-Plus Entertainment Sdn.Bhd

Phone
+603-7491 9233

Fax
+603-7491 9232

Email
Click here

Visit website

Article source:

World Heritage Melaka Trail

1. MALACCA TOURIST INFORMATION CENTRE
Your journey, very appropriately begins here. Centrally located in Old Malacca, the Malacca Tourist Centre lies between Chinatown and Dutch Square. From here your first destination is a bridge across the Malacca River.

2. MALACCA RIVER

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As you cross the bridge, look to tour left. In the distance is the rivermouth which once welcomed vessels of all shapes and sizes. Imagine, it was then a busy,noisy loading dock, crowded with mercahnts and their merchandise.

Turning into Jalan Tun Tan Cheng Lock, formely known as Heeren Street, the first thing you will notice is how narrow the street is. There is a standing joke that dogs have to wag their tails from side to side. Like all other streets in Chinatown it was originally built to accommodate oxcarts and rickshaws.


3. BABA NYONYA HERITAGE
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Jalan Tun Tan Cheng Lock was Malacca’s “Millionaire Row”. Here you will find some of the most equisite example of Baba Nyonya houses. Most of these houses display an interesting blend of Dutch and Chinese influences. One house definitely worth stopping at is No 117 with its Dutch architecture, courtyard and silver-painted dome. Of course, you must not miss the Baba Nyonya Heritage Museum, No 48 and 50, for an insight into a way of life that lasted unchanged pretty much until World War II. You will be amazed to discover how the narrow facade belies the airy spaciousness.


4. CHENG HOON TENG TEMPLE
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On Jalan Hng Lekir, you can see craftsmen constructing traditional Chinese coffins. You migh even be able to witness a typical Chinese funeral parlour. Only in Malacca is the ornate teakwood coffin covered with a gaily coloured canopy before it is conveyed to the cemetery. Turn right into Jalan Hang Jebat or Jonker Street, which known for its many antique and curio shops. You will notice that a number of the shops selling antique furniture belong ti members of the Kutty family.

In other shops you will find all types of antiques- from fragile porcelain and intricate jewellery o Chinese rosewood furniture. There are few shops selling curios, and one, Wah Aik Shoe Maker, still makes and sells little embroidered satin shoes for bound feet.While on this street look out for the oldest building in Malacca, a Dutch trading house built in 1610. Opposite it you will find a house with a very low roof- it is so low, you can touch the tiled roof with no effort at all. In this coffeeshop there is “wantan mee” stall run by two “amah cher”. Distinguished by their single pigtails and their black and white “samfoo”, these “amah’s” had come from China to work as domestics.

As you walk down any street in Chinatown, particularly along Jalan Hang Jebat, you will see itinerant hawkers calling out their wares. This used to be a common sight in any town in Malaysia,but it is not so anymore. Cut through Jalan Hang Lekiu and turn left into Jaln Tokong, or Temple Street, this street has been dubbed the “Street of Harmony” because the houses of prayer of three different religions lie on same side of the street in close proximity, coexisting in harmony for over three centuries.At the end of the street is the Cheng hoon Teng, or the Green Clouds TempleThe colourful stalls clustered around the entrance of the temple sell candles, joss paper and aromatic joss-stick required by devotees.

In the temple you will see devotees performing prayer rites that have been handed down from generation to generation, since the Chinese first settled in Malacca. Their modern dress makes a sharp contrast to the traditional robes worn by the Buddhist monk and nuns who serve the temple.


5. KAMPONG KLING MOSQUE
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Adjacent to the Cheng Hoon Teng Temple is the newest addition to the street, the buddhist temple of Siang Lin which boasts the large statue of Buddha made of carraras marble in the country.

Opposite Cheng Hoon Teng are shops selling more paraphernalia required for Taoist and Buddhist prayers. At no 11, you will see papier mache dollmakers at work. These papier mache dolls and items represent servants and luxuries, and they are burnt at funerals to ensure the recently departed a good start in the Underworld.

On the other side of Jalan Hang Lekiu is Jalan Tukang Emas, or Goldsmith Street. Here stands the Kampong Kling Mosque. Non-muslims are not permitted to enter the mosque proper but even the courtyard you will be able to appreciate the marvellous architectural touches that make this mosque so unique.

The Kampong Kling Mosque remains central to Malay community life. Centuries of prayer and contemplation have imbued the mosque with a tranquillity and intimacy that is absent from the more modern houses of prayer.

6. SRI POYYATHA VINAYAGAR TEMPLE

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This ancient Hindu temple is noteworthy for its traditional hallmarks like the minaret, which is decorate with little statue of deities and other mythological figures. Note the striking red figureines of cowns, the sacred animal of Hindus, along the eaves.

The temple is dedicated to the deity Vinayagar who is the favourite among the Hindus because it is believed that he is a remover of obstacles. He is also revered for his filial piety.

As you walk down Jalan Tukang Besi or Blacksmith Street, you can still see blacksmiths moulding their products over charcoal braziers. These skills have remained in the same families for over 300 years. The artisans cling to the belief that their luck resides in the wooden counters in their shops. Thus, although these counters are decades old and quite decrepit, their owners will not have them replaced for fear of losing their luck.

If you have the time, take a side trip along Jalan Hang Kasturi to see the tinsmiths and the bamboo craftsmen. Like the blacksmiths, these are traditional craftsmen. The tinsmith are kept busy producing lanterns, portable altars and other household items, while the bamboo craftsmen still practise the art of making intricate birdcages.

Turning back into Jalan Hang Jebat keep a watch out for Nattukottai moneylenders. These business are still run in the traditional fashion with the moneylenders sitting on the floor behind small tables.

7. CHRIST CHUCRH

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Back accros the river, you will find yourself on Jalan Kota, or Fort Terrace, which circles Dutch Square and St Paul’s Hill. Your first stop in Dutch Square should be Christ Chuch, the oldest functioning protestant church in the country.

Originally a Dutch Reform Church, it was later consecrated as an Anglican Church. Visitors of the Anglican faith will find it qiute interesting to attend Mass at Christ Church as it is conducted in English,Mandarin and Tamil to cater to the multi-ethnic congregation.

Next to the church is the General Post Office, another example of Dutch architecture. Opposite the post office, along the bank of Malacca River, you will notice a number of public scribes sitting with portable typewriters under shady trees. Once these men were indispensable, helping the illiterate conduct their official and personal business, but now they are a dying breed.

8. ST PAUL’S HISTORICAL COMPLEX

Three of the oldest building in Malacca are located in the vicinity of St Paul’s Hill. At the foot of the hill you will find the Stadhuys, on the other side, Porta de Santiago and at the peak, St Paul’s Church.

STADHUYS

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Walking along Jalan Kota you will arrive at the Stadhuys, once the residence of the Dutch Governor of Malacca and his officers. Built around 1650, it is a testimony to the solidity of Dutch masonry and woodwork, as well as their ingenuity in adopting their native architecture to the humid climate of Malacca, with the inclusion of large windows and wide verandah. Today, the Stadthuys houses the Malacca Ethnographical and Historical Museum.

At the base of the Stadthuys, you will find a plaque with a roll of honor commemorating the members of the Malacca Volunteer Corps who fell during World War II. In front of the Stadthuys in Dutch Square is the Queen Victoria Fountain, erected by the citizen of Malacca to commemorate her Diamond Jubilee. The Tan Beng Swee Clock Tower was erected in 1886 but it is obvious an attempt had been made to blend it in with the older Dutch buildings around it.


ST PAUL’S CHURCH
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A short climb up St Paul’s Hill will bring you to the ruins of St Paul’s Church. Just imagine, this same path was taken by a saint in the olden days! The church was built by the Portugese in 1521 and St Francis Xavier first preached here in 1545. Aside from his efforts to spread Christianity in the Far East, St Francis was associated with a number of miracles.

Inside the church there is an open, empty tomb where his “incorrupt” body was temporarily placed before it was moved to Basilica of Bom Jesus in Goa, India. The marble statue of St Francis in front of the church was erected to commemorate the fourth centenary of his temporary burial in the church. You will come across an unusual sight of ruins of battlements and cannons in the church. This is a remnant of the Dutch era when the church was converted into an extension of A Famosa. The Dutch had even turned the altar into a cannon embrasure.

As u leave the church, take a moment to look out over the straits of Malacca in the distance. Where once, centuries ago, you would have had a commanding view of junks and galleys jostling for space, now you may see a solitary oil tanker anchored far off in the distance.

PORTA DE SANTIAGO

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At the foot of St Paul’s Hill is Porta de Santiago, all that remains of A Famosa. Every Malaysian schoolchild will be able to tell you the story of how the fort was built by the portugese in 1512 under the command of Alfonso d’Albuquerque. The date “Anno 1607” inscribed over the portal marks the overthrow of the Portugese by the Ducth. For good measure, the Dutch conquerors also included the crest of the United Dutch East India Company above the date.

In the early 19th century, the British East India Company decided to demolish the fort. Fortunately, Sir Stamford Raffles realised the historical significance of the fort and his timely intervention “saved” Porta de Santiago for posterity.

For many centuries, A Famosa sstood as a symbol of Malacca’s importance as a trading centre between East and West. Today, its ruins remains as a timeless evocation of Malacca’s history-and more.

On Sundays and auspicious days, you can see a parade of Chinese bridal couples happily posing for photographs on Warriors Field in front of Porta de Santiago. They believe that by doing so their marriages will be as enduring as the fort.

9. MALACCA SULTANATE PALACE

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Proceeding from Porta de Santiago, you will come across another Christian cemetery. Here there are few unoccupied grave-side, which had been dug in the 17th century for Ducth subjects.
To the left of the cemetery is the Malacca Sultanate Palace. This replica of the original 15th century palace of Malacca extinct sultanate is based on sketches found in the ancient Sejarah Melayu (Malay Annals). It houses the Malacca Cultural Museum.

Opposite the palace is the Historic City Memorial Garden. There is a strong Islamic influence permeating the garden, in the manner the structures are built and decorate. The focus of this garden is the monument to be quite intriguing as it is topped with a replica of a malay royal headdress, a symbol of the Malaysian citizen’s allegiance to the throne.


10. PROCLAMATION OF INDEPENDENCE MEMORIAL
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Next to the Historic City Memorial Garden is the Proclamation of Independence Memorial. Malaccans still tend to refer to this quaint old building by its original name, the Malacca Club. Its new name is appropriate as the proclamation of Malaya’s independence was made by Malaysia’s first Prome Minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra Al-Haj, at Padang Pahlawan or Warriors Field just across the road.

On his field, you will find the Independence Obelisk. This modest monument marks the spot where the last British Residence of Malacca handed the instrument of independent to the first local Governor of Malacca on August 31,1957. The “M” on all four sides stands for “MERDEKA”, the Malay word for independence,

After this you will head back towards the Tourist Information Centre, from where you started this Heritage Trail into the heart of Old Malacca. This trail has been made possible by a generous grant from the American Express Foundation