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HANG TUAH COMMERCIAL CENTRE DEVELOPMENT

Hang Tuah Commercial Centre, Catalyst For Melaka’s Inland Development

By Fadzli Ramli

MELAKA, April 9 (Bernama) — After the successful development of Melaka Raya, Kota Laksamana, Pulau Melaka and Klebang on reclaimed land, the state government will now move forward to undertake inland development such as the Hang Tuah Commercial Centre.

Chief Minister Datuk Seri Idris Haron said the centre would require an investment of between RM400 million and RM500 million for the first phase of its development.

The centre which would be sprawled across Jalan Hang Tuah, Jalan Tun Ali, Pengkalan Rama, Kampung Morten to Melaka Sentral would comprise a hypermarket, transportation hub, tourist attractions, residences and institutions of higher learning.

“The state executive council meeting has agreed in principle to the development of the commercial centre in a move to balance reclaimed land and inland development in the state,” he told Bernama here Saturday.

He said the focus of the inland development was to raise the socio-economic status of the people in the area.

“The centre will also focus on academic development. Right now, Universiti Teknologi MARA and Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka have their campuses here,” he said, adding that eight developmental projects over 40.5 hectares is expected to be ready in five years.

Idris said two projects which would be the pillars of the commercial centre are the reconstruction of the Hang Tuah Hall and the construction of the Melaka Foundation building.

He said the existing two-storey Hang Tuah Hall will be rebuilt into an eight-storey building. It will continue to house a library but the clock tower within would be upgraded into the main landmark in the commercial centre.

The 25-storey Melaka Foundation building, to be completed in three years costing RM120million, will houses offices and a 252-room hotel that would generate income for the foundation.

Idris said the state government also planned to redevelop buildings which had no more historic value within the Hang Tuah Commercial Centre

“The affected buildings will be refurbished to look attractive so as to be able to generate economic activities in the area,” he said, adding that traffic congestion, the drug menace and prostitution will become a thing of the past.

— BERNAMA

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default

Government Urged To Build National Tourism Institution

Government Urged To Build National Tourism Institution

TEMERLOH, Jun 18 (Bernama) — The Pahang Tourism and Culture cabinet has urged a sovereign supervision to build a inhabitant tourism establishment to teach and furnish learned manpower in sequence to boost a sector.

Its chairman, Datuk Seri Mohd Sharkar Shamsuddin pronounced a tourism zone was a largest writer to a inhabitant economy and it should be managed in a veteran manner, generally in highlighting peculiarity products to tourists.

“This establishment should have a uniform curriculum to sight people who are directly concerned in a tourism industry. They will not usually be lerned as ‘little ambassadors’ of a nation in terms of speech, dress, manners and culture, though also in a Malaysian culinary humanities and food,” he told reporters here today.

A certificate from a establishment will be recognized as a ‘licence’ to open a new homestay or work with any employer in a tourism attention in a country, he added.

Mohd Sharkar, who is also Lanchang assemblyman, pronounced a state supervision was peaceful to offer suitable land for building a institution.

“Pahang has several healthy attractions such as beaches, mountains, lakes, waterfalls, hills and delegate timberland that can be highlighted to attract domestic and unfamiliar tourists.

“The many world-class traveller destinations accessible in a nation will not advantage a economy if it is not utilized properly,” he said.

News Source — BERNAMA

http://www.bernama.com/bernama/v8/newsindex.php?id=1145480

Article source:

MELAKA TARGETS 14 MILLION VISITORS IN 2013

Melaka records 6.8 mil tourist arrivals, confident of 14 mil target

Posted on 1 October 2013 – 04:28pm
Last updated on 1 October 2013 – 04:57pm

MELAKA (Oct 1, 2013): Melaka has recorded 6.8 million domestic and foreign tourist arrivals during the first six months of this year, from 6.7 million in the corresponding period last year, Chief Minister Datuk Idris Haron told the State Assembly today.

He said the state was targeting new markets, like the Middle East and Africa, with efforts being made to attract more tourists from the affected countries to come to Melaka.

“The (state) government is confident of achieving this year’s target of 14 million tourist arrivals, compared with 13.7 million last year,” he said in his motion of thanks on the speech by the Yang Dipertua Negeri of Melaka, Tun Mohd Khalil Yaakob when opening the Melaka State Assembly sitting.

He called on all quarters to play their role to achieve the target and not to politicise issues, like the case on the closing of Jonker Walk which was aimed to reduce traffic congestion in the area.

Idris said efforts were also being made by the state government to attract more investors and negotiations were in progress with giant companies, like Microsoft and Guardian, to get them to invest in Melaka.

The state government is also discussing with a company from Spain to build a renewable energy plant, involving investment of RM2 billion, he added.

Bernama

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default

MELAKA NEW FERRIS WHEEL AT PULAU MELAKA

RM20 million Ferris wheel for Pulau Melaka

Eddie Beck | August 26, 2013

Touted as the 13th tallest in the world, the Malaysian Eye is set to be the main attraction in a new RM50 million tourist complex shaping up on the once abandoned man-made island.

MALACCA: The Malaysian Eye, a 103-metre Ferris wheel touted as the 13th tallest in the world, is to be the centrepiece attraction in a new tourist complex shaping up in Pulau Melaka.

The state government has invested about RM1 billion to redevelop the once abandoned man-made island and is hoping the RM40-RM50 million tourist complex will help boost the property market.

Costing RM20 million, the Malaysian Eye is expected to be operational in the first quarter of next year. It will have 48 capsules taking 288 passengers on a 20-minute round trip.

Each passenger is expected to pay RM20 per round trip and in the first year of operation, the company expects to ferry approximately 1.2 million passengers.

Sited on a five-acre prime site in Pulau Melaka, the entire complex which will house retail and entertainment complex, food outlets and a 28-storey hotel with 300 rooms.

“A definite tourist attraction will be a chocolate factory,” said Bernard Siow, the CEO of The Eye Sdn Bhd.
“Piling work is now completed. The company will be calling for tenders to build other areas of the complex. The components of the ferris wheel have arrived and they will be assembled in stages.”

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default

BUKIT CHINA : A HILL STEEPED IN LEGEND AND HISTORY

Published: Friday August 16, 2013 MYT 12:00:00 AM
Updated: Friday August 16, 2013 MYT 11:00:18 AM

Bukit China: A hill steeped in legend and history

BY M. VEERA PANDIYAN

[email protected]

The Bukit China Chinese cemetery in Malacca is the oldest in the country.

Its name can be traced to a legendary Ming Dynasty princess who supposedly arrived from China to marry Mansur Shah, the sixth Sultan of Malacca who ruled Malacca from 1459 to 1477.

Bukit China (Chinese Hill) was originally an undulating jungle of three mounds — Bukit Tinggi, Bukit Gedong and Bukit Tempurong.

It apparently took on the name after the Sultan allowed the entourage of princess Hang Li Poh to settle around the foot of the main hill.

These days, there are doubts over the purported royal lineage of Hang Li Po, as there is no written evidence to show that she was indeed a princess.

The guesswork is that she might have been a daughter of one of the emperor’s concubines or even a royal handmaiden.

But there are no doubts about the special relationship between Malacca and China then.

According to the Ming Shi-lu (Veritable Records Of The Ming Dynasty), an envoy of Balimisura (Parameswara) went to China in 1405 to offer tribute and another arrived two years later, complaining about Siam’s aggression and seizure of his kingdom’s royal seal.

An example of past architecture at Bukit China.
The following year, Ming’s renowned admiral Zheng He (Cheng Ho) was sent to Malacca.

Parameswara gave another tribute to the emperor the following year after Siam stopped intimidating his kingdom.

The records also note that Parameswara arrived at the emperor’s court on Aug 4, 1411 with his family of 540 followers and that he was treated with respect and showered with banquets and impressive presents during his stay.

As for Sultan Mansur Shah, the palace where he supposedly lived with all his wives, including Hang Li Po, was said to be at the foot of Bukit Melaka (today’s St Paul’s Hill).

There is now a replica of the palace, which houses the Malacca Cultural Museum. It was built using three types of hardwood — cengal, rasak and belian (for the roof) — based on what was written in Sejarah Melayu (Malay Annals).

It was written that the sultan ordered a well to be dug at Bukit China for the new immigrants. The well, Perigi Raja remains to this day and never dries up even during droughts.

Bukit China remained largely forested until the Portuguese built a chapel called Madre De Deus (Mother of God) and monastery at the top of the hill in 1581.

It was destroyed in an Achehnese attack in 1629. The Achehnese actually held Malacca for about eight months before the Portuguese won it back.

The monastery was rebuilt when the Achehnese were finally defeated with the deaths of prominent warriors, including Panglima Pidi whose grave, known as keramat panjang (long sacred grave) remains on Bukit China.

There are about 20 other Muslim graves nearby and the area used to be a favourite haunt of those seeking “spiritual help” for four-digit numbers during the 60s and early 70s.

In addition to the beach at Tanjung Kling, it was also an alternative site for the then popular Mandi Safar festival which was banned as “unIslamic” activities during the 80’s.

Bukit China became a Chinese cemetery in 1685 when Lee Wei King, the then “Kapitan China” of Malacca, bought the three hills from the Dutch and renamed them as “San Pao Shan” (Three Gems Hill or Three Protections Hill). He placed it under the trust of the Cheng Hoon Teng temple.

Reputedly the oldest remaining traditional Chinese burial ground in the world with 12,500 graves, Bukit China remained largely unknown and mostly overgrown until about this time of the year, 29 years ago.

All hell literally broke loose during the Hungry Ghosts Festival in 1984, when the Malacca Government announced its plans to develop the 42ha hill into a housing and commercial centre in July 1984.

The then Chief Minister, (now Tan Sri) Abdul Rahim Tamby Chik, gave three options — development of the hill solely by the Chinese community, joint development by the state and community or development by the state.

The plan sparked anger and outrage throughout the country, moving the diverse community to come together to preserve a heritage symbolising their earliest ancestors links to the country.

When the trustees of the Cheng Hoon Teng Temple conducted a survey to gauge public response on the development proposal, 553 associations and close to 300,000 people replied with a resounding no, against a mere 73 who agreed.

The country’s first Prime Minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman, was among those against the plan, lending more weight to calls for its preservation.

Representatives of political parties urged the then PM (now Tun) Dr Mahathir Mohamad to intervene and resolve the politically explosive and racially divisive issue.

As Carolyn Cartier, professor of geography and urban studies at the University of Technology, Sydney noted in her book, Globalising South China, the Save Bukit China campaign achieved ethnic and class representation and became a national movement, the first to grow to such proportions in the history of the country.

The State government eventually relented and has since been promoting Bukit China as part of its rich cultural heritage.

Today, the hill has become a recreational ground where joggers have carved out a track between graves. It has also become a valuable green lung for the city, offering great views from the peak.

The Chinese living around the area, covering Jalan Bukit China, Lorong Bukit China, Jalan Temenggong, Kampung Bukit China and nearby Banda Kaba, are referred to as the “San Pao Ching” community, in reference to several old wells in the area, seven of which were said to be dug during the time of Zheng He.

In addition to a hike up the hill, among the must-see sights for tourists are the Poh San Teng temple, built in 1795 by another Kapitan China, Chua Su Cheong and the Chinese War Memorial, located next to it.

The cenotaph to remember those who were brutally killed during the Japanese Occupation consists of an obelisk inscribed with Chinese calligraphy mounted on a raised platform with a Kuomintang flag at the top.

Thousands were killed after Malacca fell to the Japanese on Jan 15, 1942. The horror stories include burying victims alive and the killing of babies by throwing them up into the air and stabbing them with bayonets as they fell.

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default