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Cuisine in Melaka

RAPTOR WATCH 2012 (MARCH 10-11) IS BACK

23 February 2012 | last updated at 12:34am

Raptor Watch takes flight for 13th straight year

MALACCA: Raptor Watch, one of the region’s biggest bird-watching events, promises yet another exciting spectacle this year.
Organised by the Malaysian Nature Society (MNS) in partnership with the Malacca government, the event will take place for the 13th straight year at PNB Ilham Resort, near Tanjung Tuan, on March 10 and 11.

Every year, spectators get to see thousands of raptors, also known as birds of prey, migrate north to their breeding grounds in Siberia, China, the Korean peninsula and Japan from their winter refuge in the south.

Tanjung Tuan, which is gazetted as a forest reserve, is the nearest landfall across the Straits of Malacca from Indonesia and is an important site for the birds to rest or catch thermals before continuing on their journey.

Due to its importance to migratory birds, the 60ha site is designated as an important bird area by Birdlife International.

MNS conserves the forest reserve by promoting Raptor Watch, through which it raises awareness of raptors and the need to conserve their habitat.

Visitors come from Singapore, Taiwan, the Philippines and Thailand. Last year, about 2,000 turned up.

This year, MNS hopes to get even more spectators to take part in activities, which include guided walks, eco-talks, games, arts and crafts, an obstacle course and a treasure hunt.

MNS head of communications Andrew Sebastian said last year’s raptor count went up to 57,000 birds over more than 40 days.

“This year, we have spotted 141 raptors, which may seem like a small number, but this is a good sign, as it means the birds will come in big numbers in March.”

For details, visit http://mnsrw2012.wordpress.com

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Tourism Malaysia

History: Melaka River

Once dubbed ‘Venice of the East’ by European seafarers back in those days when the state has yet to be formed, Melaka River is the point where the history of the great empire of the Malay peninsular, Melaka began. A Prince from Sumatra, Parameswara (the founder of Melaka) had established his sultanate near the mouth of this river in the early 1400s, and his palace was built on the east-bank of the river at the foot of St. Paul’s Hill, then known as Melaka Hill.

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Cuisine in Melaka

ANCIENT ARTEFACT IN BABY SHARK STOMACH

Woman finds ancient Portugese artefact in baby shark

inShare
The Star/Asia News Network
Wednesday, Feb 22, 2012

MALACCA – A baby shark being prepared for lunch gave a family here a big surprise – an ancient artefact believed to be dated long before the Portuguese conquest of Malacca.

Housewife Suseela Menon, from Klebang, made the priceless discovery while filleting the fish for lunch.

It is believed to be a medallion worn by the Portuguese soldiers, presumably as a divine protection, during their conquests in this part of the world in the 16th century.

One side of the medallion is a profile of a woman’s head with a crown and encircled by a halo and an inscription that is unclear. The other side is a crucifix with an engraved inscription that read ANTONII.

Checks with a local historian revealed the head engraving could be that of Queen Elizabeth, the consort of King Denis I of Portugal during his reign from 1271 to 1336.

Ms Suseela said she immediately cleaned the medallion and preserved it in a box.

‘I bought two sharks from the wet market and was taken aback upon discovering the object inside the stomach of one of the fishes,’ said the 47-year-old mother-of-two at her home yesterday.

Ms Suseela had wanted to prepare shark curry for her husband.

‘Finally, my husband decided not to eat the fish as the object seems to be a religious item,’ she said.

The medallion is 7.4cm long, 6cm wide and weighs 10g.

‘My husband feels it is a blessing for the family to have the medallion coming to our home from beneath the sea. We will always cherish it,’ said Ms Suseela.

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Cuisine in Melaka

WILD DOGS OF MELAKA ZOO

Email Print 18 February 2012

Zoo’s success with wild dogs

By HANIS MAKETAB
AYER KEROH
[email protected]

Malacca Zoo boasts of first dhole pups born in captivity in Malaysia

Visitors to Malacca Zoo have the opportunity to see rare dholes, including the first pair of pups born in captivity in Malaysia in August last year. Pic by Mohd Jamah Nasri
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Malacca Zoo welcomed the first dhole pups born in captivity in the country recently.
Zoo director Ahmad Azhar Mohammed said the pups — a male and a female — were born in August last year and were now six months old.

“We (Malacca Zoo) had received our first dhole, a male, in 2008 from Terengganu while the second dhole, a female, had been sent to us from Zoo Negara in 2010.

“Soon after, the pair mated and… here they are,” he told the New Straits Times, gesturing at the pups.

The pups, which had already grown to be nearly as big as their parents, bounded about in their enclosure, perhaps excited by all the attention they were getting from the photographer.

Often, they would approach the chain-link fence separating them from the public, sniffing curiously at those brave enough to come close to them.

Unlike dogs, they did not bark, but rather, let out a high-pitched whining noise or brief yaps.

“Once they are old enough to be separated from their mother, we hope to exchange them with any other zoo that have stock.

“This is to avoid inbreeding.”

Ahmad added that in the wild, it was quite rare to come across them, but visitors to the zoo had the opportunity to come and see a family of dholes first-hand.

The dhole, also known as the Asiatic Wild Dog or “anjing hutan”, is only found in Asia and Southeast Asia and is classified as “endangered” by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

It is estimated that fewer than 2,500 mature individuals remain in the wild and the declining population trend is expected to continue.

The main threats to the species include ongoing habitat loss, depletion of prey base, harassment and possible disease transfer from domestic and feral dogs.

Dholes are unique members of the canid family as they do not fit neatly into any of the sub-families such as foxes or wolf-like dogs and are thus placed in a genus of its own — cuon.

Scientifically known as the Cuon alpinus, dholes usually have coats that are rusty red in colour with lighter, yellow fur on its underside.

Together with the grey wolf, the African hunting dog and the Amazonian bush dog, the dhole is one of the few dogs that regularly hunts in packs and together are capable of bringing down larger animals such as wild boars and water buffalos, sometimes even tigers.

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Tourism Malaysia

History: Dutch Graveyard

The graveyard was first used at the last quarter of the 17th century. Currently, 5 Dutch and 33 British graves are sited within the compound. The cemetery was used in two stages that is between 1670-1682 and later between 1818-1838.

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