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Cuisine in Melaka

MELAKA 2 MEGA PROJECTS IN THE WORKS

MELAKA (Aug 21, 2013): Two mega projects, The Melaka Gateway and Dinosaurs and Underwater World, to be built in Melaka, are expected to boost the state’s gross domestic product (GDP) to more than RM6 billion.

Chairman of the State Economic Consultative Council (MPEN) Datuk Seri Mohd Ali Rustam said The Melaka Gateway, to be constructed on a 209.6-hectare site at a cost of RM30 billion at Bandar Hilir, is expected to contribute RM6 billion to the GDP.

“This project is projected to generate about 15,000 job opportunities for locals, apart from increasing the tourist arrivals to 2.5 million annually,” he told reporters here.

He said the project comprised a number of key components, including the construction of three man-made islands near Pulau Melaka, a shopping complex, hotel, condominium, Cultural Performance Complex (Melaka Impression), as well as a housing estate based on the concept of a cultural village.

He said the RM240 million Dinosaurs and Underwater World project will be realised on a 14.1-hectare site in Klebang and contribute RM48 million to Melaka’s GDP.

Mohd Ali said this project comes complete with various public facilities such as food and beverage shops as well as souvenirs, while attracting 600,000 tourists annually.

He said the recreational park is also seen as capable of creating 1,000 job opportunities for the people of Melaka. In another development, Mohd Ali said the MPEN has proposed three steps to consolidate Melaka’s economy in future.

He said it involved strengthening Melaka’s Bumiputera-based companies, enhancing key infrastructure through the Straits of Melaka coastal highway and creating the ‘Museum Tour’ in the state.

“MPEN committee members have suggested that the state government study, identify and implement development, as well as assist selected Bumiputera-based companies to be mentored to become those with potential and competitiveness,” he added.

He said the state government should also lobby the Federal government to continue the coastal highway as the project can provide an impact to the state’s economic development, and the effort to make it a city-state.

Mohd Ali said the Museum Tour is aimed at enabling tourists to be offered attractive tourism packages to destinations throughout the state through the use of buses on a systematic basis as well as guides. – Bernama

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Cuisine in Melaka

MALAYSIA FIRST CHINESE PAGODA MOSQUE

New Straits Times
Monday, May 27, 2013
MALACCA – Malaysia’s first Chinese pagoda-inspired mosque will be completed in April next year.

State Chinese Muslim Association (Pertim) chairman Mohd Mansor Yap Abdullah said the mosque, estimated to cost about RM7.5 million (S$3.13 million), would be located at Krubong, near here, and would not only cater to Chinese Muslims in the state, but all Muslims.

He said the mosque, which was being built on a 2.4ha site, would be a combination of the architectural designs of several mosques in Beijing, Shanghai and Xian.

“This mosque will be the first in the country which will incorporate the pagoda in its design.

“Hopefully, it will become a tourist attraction. I also hope that the mosque will open doors for the Chinese community to have closer ties with the Muslim community, fostering better understanding between both communities.”

Mansor added that the mosque would implement a natural ventilation concept.

“The main prayer space will be able to cater up to 2,000 Muslims at one time, while the outer prayer space will have room for up to 3,000 ummah,” he said after visiting the mosque’s construction site here yesterday.

Construction of the mosque’s main building began earlier this year through an allocation of RM5.9 million from the Federal Government, which was approved by Deputy Prime Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin in October 2011.

An additional RM1.6 million was later contributed towards the project from donations, as well as a state government fund set up by former chief minister Datuk Seri Mohd Ali Rustam.

Mansor said once the mosque was completed, Pertim’s office would be moved there to facilitate the association’s activities and programmes for the community.

“The mosque will also offer facilities, such as a funeral rites room, meeting rooms and a library.

“The Chinese Muslim community here is excited about the mosque, as their dream of having a Chinese pagoda-inspired mosque will soon be realised.”

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Cuisine in Melaka

MELAKA RIVER PROJECT NOW A MODEL FOR OTHERS

14 June 2013| last updated at 11:38PM

Sungai Melaka project a model for others

By Jason Gerald | [email protected]

REHABILITATION: The once lifeless waterway has been turned into Malacca’s most lucrative tourism product

THE phrase “Everything began in Malacca” is not something which was just coined to attract tourism, but is in actual fact what this state has to offer to other states in Malaysia.

The birth of the nation is attributed to the glory of the Malacca sultanate in the 15th century, and Malacca is where the independence of Malaysia was first announced by the country’s founding father, Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra Al Haj at the Dataran Pahlawan in Banda Hilir.

Malacca has been a benchmark for many developments in the country after the state was steered into becoming a developed state — recognised by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) — and is now spearheading the nation’s green technology initiatives.

And now, what was once famed as one of the busiest ports in the world, the Melaka River, is becoming a benchmark for the rehabilitation and beautification of rivers throughout the country.

Known as the Venice of the East in the 15th century, the waterway had slowly deteriorated and became one of the dirtiest rivers in the country till some 12 years ago.

In 2001, the state government, with assistance from the Federal Government, had embarked on the first phase of the Melaka River beautification project costing some RM200 million.

The first phase of the Melaka River rehabilitation project started at the tip of the river mouth to the Hang Tuah bridge which included the construction of two new jetties and an archway across the river.

The restoration and beautification project paid off handsomely, as now the once lifeless river has not only been revived but it has been turned into the most lucrative tourism product that Malacca has to offer.

The recent Sungai Melaka International River Festival created history when the Drainage and Irrigation Department director-general, Datuk Ahmad Husaini Sulaiman, said the State administration’s success in turning the river into one of the finest in the country, region and also the world would be the main point of reference for the revival and beautification of all rivers in the country.

The effort taken by the Malacca government in beautifying the Melaka River has not only managed to turn the river into a commodity for tourism but also helped in mitigating floods.

Under the 10th Malaysia Plan all rivers in the country were allocated RM3.47 billion for flood mitigation works, rehabilitation and beautification exercise. Melaka alone was allocated RM285 million.

In Malacca’s case, this money was not only used for flood mitigation works but also for the cleaning, beautification, and upgrading of the river system from the Sungai Melaka estuary right up to Malim.

This success of making Sungai Melaka into a living river is proposed to be replicated across the country.

Sungai Melaka is flanked by several delightful structures such as the Dutch or Red Square, traditional villages and other tourist attractions. In the second phase of its rehabilitation would start at the Hang Jebat bridge up to Batu Hampar, covering 5.2km.

The second phase would be divided into three main work packages; first would cover a 2.4km waterway from the Hang Jebat bridge to the Tun Razak bridge, followed by 1.2km from the Tun Razak bridge to the Melaka Sentral bridge, and the final package from the Melaka Sentral bridge to the Tidal Control Gate that stretches for 1.6km.

This would also include deepening the depth of the river, constructing walls and walkways along the river, landscapes, three water taxi stations at Taman Rempah and Jusco AEON, building unique bridges and beautifying the banks of the river.

Once the project is completed, the water quality of Sungai Melaka is expected to improve from class 111 barometer to class 11B by the year 2015.

The current success of the Melaka River rehabilitation and beautification project could also be seen through the Melaka River Cruise.

When the cruise started in 2006 there were only 56 visitors, but last year alone it attracted some 1.1 million passengers, and this year it is targeted that the Melaka River Cruise would attract some 1.4 million visitors.

Besides being a benchmark for rivers in Malaysia, the Malacca government is also aiming to work towards getting this event listed on the World Tourism Calendar of Events, similar to the San Antonio River festival in Texas, United States.

Read more: Sungai Melaka project a model for others – Columnist – New Straits Times http://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnist/sungai-melaka-project-a-model-for-others-1.299900#ixzz2WE8IVouO

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Cuisine in Melaka

ZOO MELAKA TO BE PRIVATISED

21 November 2012 | last updated at 09:50PM

State govt to take over Zoo Melaka by year’s end

By Hanis Maketab
[email protected]

MALACCA: The State zoological park or Zoo Melaka would be taken over by the State Government from the Department of Wildlife and National Parks of Malaysia, which is under the Federal Government, by the year’s end.

Chief Minister Datuk Seri Mohd Ali Rustam said the management of the zoo would be primarily taken over by a consortium which would be headed by the Hang Tuah Jaya Municipal Council.

The consortium would be made up of Koperasi Hang Tuah Jaya, Koperasi Bela Masyarakat (Kobemas) and WildlifeTheatre Melaka.

The consortium hopes to adopt the management style of the Singapore Zoo to steer Zoo Melaka to greater heights.
Mohd Ali said that while the state government was awaiting an official letter from the Natural Resources and Environment Ministry, preparations were currently under-way for the take over.

“Th privatisation will include an upgrade of its facilities and infrastructure, which is expected to cost up to RM6 million.

“We would also be changing the name of the zoo to ‘Melaka Zoo and Night Safari’. Once everything is finalised, the zoo would be a private entity, it will no longer receive the RM4 million yearly grant from the Federal Government, and therefore, the new management must work towards ensuring the zoo’s continued success,” he said.
Mohd Ali said he hoped the zoo’s privatisation would be the first step in improving it as a major tourist attraction not only for the state, but for Malaysia as well.
“Malacca Zoo is currently one of the best zoos in the country, and I believe it can one day become a world-renowned zoo,” he said.

When asked on the fate of the contract employees of the Zoo Melaka, Mohd Ali said that they would be absorbed by the Hang Tuah Jaya Municipal Council.
Zoo Melaka is a 54-acre (approximately 21.22 ha) zoological park located beside Lebuh Ayer Keroh in Malacca.

The zoo has progressed rapidly since 1979 to become the second biggest zoo in the country, behind the National Zoo of Malaysia (Zoo Negara).
Zoo Melaka annually records than 400,000 visitors and more than half of the visitors are from Melaka and the neighbouring states. Its annual ticket collection exceeds RM3 million.
The number of exhibits has also increased significantly since it opened and as of today there are a total of over 1,200 specimen made up of 215 different species of birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians in the zoo.

The major attractions in Zoo Melaka are the highly endangered Sumatran Rhinoceros, Malayan Sun Bear, Malayan Gaur, Serow and the Malayan Tiger.
The zoo is also renowned world over as a a centre for wildlife research, conservation and breeding, especially for the Malayan Tiger, Wild Dogs (Dhole), panther, tapir, serow, barking deer, sambar deer and many others. 

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All Malaysia Info

Stalking sea mammals in Langkawi

Biologists are collecting information on cetaceans in Langkawi in a bid to know how best to strengthen them.

WHENEVER Langkawi is mentioned, it customarily conjures adult images of sandy beaches, rainforests, waterfalls, mangroves and duty-free shopping. Few visitors realize that a waters around Langkawi’s 104 islands are home to dolphins, porpoises and even whales.

As a sea biologist, Dr Louisa Ponnampalam hopes to lift recognition about sea mammals that live around Pulau Langkawi, Kedah

Marine biologist Dr Louisa Ponnampalam, co-founder of a MareCet Research Organisation that is concerned in sea reptile research, hopes that this will change and is operative tough to boost recognition and collect information about sea mammals in a island off Kedah.

“If we can do good investigate here in Langkawi, afterwards we can start to consider about starting identical investigate projects in places like Penang and Perak,” she says.

Last month, she conducted a week-long consult of sea mammals with volunteers and members of Langkawi Dolphin Research, a plan of MareCet. The organization derives a name from a Latin mare – definition sea – and a contraction of a word cetacean, that is a common noun for whales, dolphins and porpoises. As a name suggests, these are a animals that are a intent of Ponnampalam’s study.

“We’ve been doing this given 2010. The some-more information we collect, a some-more we will know about a habits of these mammals in their healthy environment. We can use this believe to know how best to strengthen them.”

Some of a information collected during a margin outing includes new information on a placement of sea mammals around Langkawi, including estimates of organization distance and a transformation and contentment of these groups. By comparing photos from prior margin trips, Ponnampalam has shown that some particular humpback dolphins seem to cite certain sites around Langkawi, while others tend to pierce around a archipelago a bit more.

When asked because a organization chose to concentration on Langkawi, she replies: “We had already listened of utterly a few sightings in Langkawi, so we knew there were sea mammals here, though there was no arguable information to contend accurately how many and of what species. Since Langkawi is one of Malaysia’s tip tourism destinations, we felt it critical to know a dynamics of how land-based and water-based tellurian activities might be inspiring a animals and their sea environment. The fact that Langkawi is simply permitted compared to a islands on a easterly seashore of a peninsula creates a difference, too.”

As good as spending time during sea looking for cetaceans, members of MareCet are also actively concerned in substantiating a discourse with internal fishermen who are also an critical source of first-hand information about a participation and poise of sea mammals. MareCet provides discipline to them on protected fishing practices, utterly a forms of nets and hooks to be used to equivocate injuring or murdering sea mammals. Their website also provides recommendation for tourism operators, that embody not permitting anyone to feed, hold or float with a animals.

Living her dream

Ponnampalam is a energetic immature lady who clearly has a loyalty and expostulate required for her selected career.

“This is what I’ve always wanted to do,” she says. “I am vital my dream. When we was 13, we told everybody that we would go to Hawaii and investigate to turn a sea biologist and that we would set adult my possess investigate trickery behind in Malaysia. we haven’t utterly achieved a second partial yet, though MareCet is a starting point.”

Dr Louisa Ponnampalam estimate a dugong skull

Although she complicated in Hawaii and Scotland and did investigate for her PhD in Oman, she always designed on returning to Malaysia. “I adore to travel, though Malaysia is my home. And a sea mammals here are vagrant to be studied. Marine biology is still unequivocally immature in Malaysia. Compared to other countries, there is still a lot to do here. That creates it sparkling to be a sea biologist in Malaysia. In a way, we are pioneers.”

During final month’s survey, a organization sighted Indo-Pacific finless porpoises, Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins, Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins and Bryde’s whales around Langkawi as good as Irrawaddy dolphins tighten to Kuala Perlis. Group sizes for a dolphins and porpoises ranged from one to 150 people though for whales, usually one or dual were seen during a time.

I was propitious adequate to be invited to join a consult organisation on dual of their margin trips. Both days, we set off before 7am and did not get behind until 10pm. Most of that time was spent out on a water.

“It’s a existence check for some of a immature students who are deliberation a career in sea biology,” says Ponnampalam. “My friends say, ‘Oh, you’re so propitious to go out on a boat’ though they don’t see a prolonged hours we put in. Not everybody is willing, or able, to spend time in such simple conditions, or eat peanut butter sandwiches any day,” she says with a laugh.

Most of her days on house are spent in a high chair that reminds me of a tennis umpire’s chair. From that vantage point, there is a larger margin of vision, though it is burdensome to keep examination a waves for any pointer of transformation in a water. Every call and shade creates we consternation if something is there.

The initial morning, after hardly half an hour out of Kuah harbour, we mark something. The vessel idles to a halt. The overpower toll in my ears after a engine cuts out is shortly transposed by a dash of waves opposite a fibreglass carcass of a boat.

“Indo-Pacific finless porpoise – three, presumably five,” calls out Ponnampalam from her perch, looking by a span of binoculars. This information is remarkable down, along with a GPS coordinates. Visibility and call bloat tallness according to a Beaufort scale are jotted down as good and we take measurements of depth, H2O temperature, salinity, turn of dissolved oxygen and a participation of any other boats in a vicinity. All this tender information will be fed into a mechanism during a finish of a day and will yield Ponnampalam with copiousness of work during her post in a Institute of Ocean and Earth Sciences in Universiti Malaya, Kuala Lumpur.

“We’ve seen vast groups of Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins during this outing and they seem to include especially of mother-calf pairs, maybe a plan of ‘safety in numbers’. We also celebrated unequivocally high-energy amicable and passionate activity in a groups of humpback dolphins that we encountered.”

Helpful technology

This year, another vessel has assimilated in a survey. Dr Satoko Kimura of Nagoya University in Japan is an acoustics dilettante conducting investigate on freshwater ?nless porpoises found in a Yangtze River in China and has come to Langkawi to serve her research.

“We are unequivocally propitious that she can join us on this margin trip,” says Ponnampalam. “It’s a initial time that we are regulating acoustic methods to investigate dolphins in Malaysia.”

I join Kimura’s vessel in a afternoon. The skipper is a exhausted fisherman who spends his nights fishing for squid. we assistance Kimura keep him awake, though spasmodic he falls defunct and a vessel steers extravagantly off course. Her vessel travels some-more solemnly than a lead vessel and trails a prolonged wire with specifically designed microphones attached.

“Dolphins and porpoises make sounds all a time,” says Kimura. “If there is bad visibility, they use sounds to let any other know where they are. They promulgate in unequivocally high-frequency sounds that humans can't hear. We can hear 16-20 hertz though Yangtze finless porpoises can hear adult to 125 hertz.”

There are dual NBHF (Narrow-Band High-Frequency) units on a cable, any with dual microphones. Analysing a sounds by triangulation can give a accurate plcae of a reptile and, in a tiny group, give an thought of a series of people present. This information will after be compared to Ponnampalam’s visible sightings.

“Maybe she can see dual or 3 dolphins though a acoustic readings can infrequently uncover that there were some-more people next a surface. This gives us some-more accurate data,” says Kimura.

Other than a few porpoises in a morning, we don’t see anything else for a rest of a day. The solid tranquil sound of a vessel engine and a rocking of a waves collaborate to peace me to sleep. we arise to find that a breeze has picked up. White crests are zipping opposite a peaks of a waves as a continue hovers between 3 and 4 on a Beaufort scale.

GPS coordinates have been pre-set and we follow invisible transect lines along a sea, trimming from roughly all a approach south to Pulau Payar, where fishing trawlers float only over a limit of a designated sea park, tighten to Kuala Perlis in a north, only a integrate of nautical miles bashful of a limit with Thailand. It is dim by a time we lapse to Kuah harbour.

Biggest fish

The following evening, Ponnampalam tells me that a organisation sighted 152 Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins. This was something we unequivocally wanted to see, so we assimilated a organisation again a following day in a hopes of sighting something similar. This time, a transect lines were shorter and ranged some-more to a south of Langkawi, trimming Pulau Tuba, Pulau Dayang Bunting and dozens of smaller islands with removed dull beaches and engaging stone formations. we detected tools of Langkawi that we had never seen before, good off a paths of a customary island-hopping tours that are so renouned with a island’s visitors.

I was travelling in Kimura’s boat. Ponnampalam and her organisation had reached a finish of a line and were watchful for us to arrive. Suddenly everybody was station adult and indicating during something in a water. we saw see a few ripples, though couldn’t tell what it was.

“A whale shark,” shouts Ponnampalam excitedly. we took from her feeling that this was something utterly exceptional.

Our boatman took us in a bit closer to a ripples, though we still couldn’t see anything solely a reflected glisten off a aspect of a water. Then unexpected it was there right beside a boat, hardly a metre underneath a surface. we was dumbfounded by a distance of it – roughly as prolonged as a vessel and some-more than large adequate to overturn us if it should so wish, though a whale shark seemed calm to let us admire a rows of star-like patterns on a behind and give us a time to snap a few photos. The whale shark is a world’s biggest fish and can magnitude adult to 14m. The quadruped we speckled is roughly half that size.

After a few minutes, it dived deeper and afterwards a aspect ripples seemed serve out. The boatmen incited their boats and we headed behind towards a categorical island.

“According to internal fishermen, they are found nearby Langkawi from Sep to February,” says Ponnampalam .

The following day, a MareCet organisation done dual some-more whale shark sightings in further to all a other information collected over a week.

Malaysia is a nautical republic and a fish-eating nation. It depends on a health of a waters to feed a race and say a fisheries. In sequence to strengthen a nautical assets, some-more has to be accepted about these formidable ecosystems and that requires dedicated researchers like Ponnampalam and her organisation and a comforts required to do their work.

“I wish that we can lift recognition of a significance of sea charge in Malaysia and that a work we are doing will someday materialize into a permanent investigate trickery here in Langkawi,” says Ponnampalam. – Marc de Faoite

Much of MareCet’s appropriation is now contingent on investigate grants from Australia and Universiti Malaya. To continue a research, it welcomes contributions, both financial and in kind, from people and corporations. Learn some-more about MareCet during marecet.org.


Map: Pulau Langkawi, Kedah

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