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Tourism Malaysia

TOP 5 SPOTS TO SAY “I DO”

Malaysia has long been a preferred destination for weddings and honeymoons. A combination of multicultural people and beautiful landscapes makes Malaysia a unique place to hold a wedding and also honeymoon. But before the wedding and honeymoon, one must go through a wedding proposal first, right? Well, why don’t you do all three in Malaysia?

First, let me throw out some ideas for a unique and memorable wedding proposal in Malaysia, just in time for the coming February, the month of love.

1. Underwater

What better place is there to pop the question for scuba diving enthusiasts than under the sea? Surrounded by sea fans, whips, a school of fishes and colourful corals, it was a perfect place to surprise your love one with a marriage proposal. It will be your own Atlantis for sure. Of course when you are underwater, you can’t use our voice to propose to her but you can hold the sign asking her to marry you or lay out a banner on the side of a shipwreck with most romantic words that will impress her hook, line, and sinker. You do need a team though to make sure you’ll have a perfect and memorable marriage proposal.

Scuba diving sites in Malaysia that can be the location for your marriage proposal include Redang, Lang Tengah, and Perhentian Islands (Terengganu), Sipadan, Sapi, Mabul, Layang-Layang, and Mataking Islands (Sabah), as well as Satang Besar, Satang Kecil and Sempadi Islands and Miri waters (Sarawak).

2. Top of the Mountain

There’s no finer backdrop to propose to your wife-to-be than the top of the Mount Kinabalu in Sabah. Standing at a majestic 4,095 meters or 13, 435 feet above sea level, Mount Kinabalu is the highest mountain in Malaysia. You may have to wake up at 3 am to climb to the top in order to watch the sunrise but the sheer beauty of the scenery will take your breath away and help romanticised the venue of your marriage proposal. It will definitely help your love one forget about the grueling four-hour climb, the altitude change and cold temperature.

Mt. Kinabalu is a popular destination, visitors who wish to climb Mount Kinabalu are advised to make reservations 6 months in advance to avoid disappointment. The number of climbers is limited to 135 pax daily.

Website: http://www.sabahtourism.com/activity/climb-mt-kinabalu

3. Zipline

Take your love one all the way to Langkawi Island and get her to spend two and a half hours soaring along 12 different ziplines over the waterfalls and within the top and middle layer of the island’s rainforest. And with her adrenaline still high from gliding through an oxygen-rich forest,

can you imagine how incredible it is for her when she got off the line and the first thing she will see is you on bended knee with a ring in one hand? It’s worth a try, don’t you think so?

Umgawa is the island’s first world-class zipline eco-adventure tour, which offers spectacular views of Matchincang Peak, Seven Wells Waterfall and the Andaman Sea. Umgawa’s course features 12 ziplines, one double zipline, three sky-bridges suspended in the trees, and a spectacular descent from towering trees.

Website: www.umgawa.com

4. The Rainbow Skywalk

The Rainbow Skywalk is the talk of the town in Penang Island because it offers stunning seamless views of George Town and beyond. Located at George Town’s highest point, the open-air Rainbow Skywalk, a semi-circular glass-bottomed platform extending out from the edge of the Komtar tower is at Level 68, offering visitors the thrilling experience of walking on air 249m above ground.

Make the best of this venue and wait for the sun to set over the Penang Hill and beyond, or wait for the city of George Town to light up before you propose to your love one. I’ll bet it is going to be one of the most beautiful and romantic marriage proposals ever. But before you do that, please make sure your love one doesn’t have a fear of height. Then, you are good to go!

Website: https://thetop.com.my/rainbow-skywalk

5. Plane In The City

Located in the heart of the city at Jalan Bukit Bintang, Plane In The City, which is an an actual Boeing 737 aircraft, is listed in the Malaysia Book of Records as the 1st Aeroplane Restaurant in Malaysia.

The Plane In The City is the perfect venue to propose to your wife-to-be because just admit it, it won’t be as romantic as in the actual plane flying at 35,000 feet, right? With this real-life flight simulation, you don’t have to deal with small aisle or an unpredictable turbulence or crying babies, or being rejected in front of strangers of various nationalities. To make it more interesting, you can propose on the wing of the airplane, and that experience my friend, will be unforgettable.

Website: http://www.planeinthecity.com

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Categories
Tourism Malaysia

TOP 5 WEDDING PROPOSAL SPOTS

Malaysia has long been a preferred destination for weddings and honeymoons. A combination of multicultural people and beautiful landscapes makes Malaysia a unique place to hold a wedding and also honeymoon. But before the wedding and honeymoon, one must go through a wedding proposal first, right? Well, why don’t you do all three in Malaysia?

First, let me throw out some ideas for a unique and memorable wedding proposal in Malaysia, just in time for the coming February, the month of love.

1. Underwater

What better place is there to pop the question for scuba diving enthusiasts than under the sea? Surrounded by sea fans, whips, a school of fishes and colourful corals, it was a perfect place to surprise your love one with a marriage proposal. It will be your own Atlantis for sure. Of course when you are underwater, you can’t use our voice to propose to her but you can hold the sign asking her to marry you or lay out a banner on the side of a shipwreck with most romantic words that will impress her hook, line, and sinker. You do need a team though to make sure you’ll have a perfect and memorable marriage proposal.

Scuba diving sites in Malaysia that can be the location for your marriage proposal include Redang, Lang Tengah, and Perhentian Islands (Terengganu), Sipadan, Sapi, Mabul, Layang-Layang, and Mataking Islands (Sabah), as well as Satang Besar, Satang Kecil and Sempadi Islands and Miri waters (Sarawak).

2. Top of the Mountain

There’s no finer backdrop to propose to your wife-to-be than the top of the Mount Kinabalu in Sabah. Standing at a majestic 4,095 meters or 13, 435 feet above sea level, Mount Kinabalu is the highest mountain in Malaysia. You may have to wake up at 3 am to climb to the top in order to watch the sunrise but the sheer beauty of the scenery will take your breath away and help romanticised the venue of your marriage proposal. It will definitely help your love one forget about the grueling four-hour climb, the altitude change and cold temperature.

Mt. Kinabalu is a popular destination, visitors who wish to climb Mount Kinabalu are advised to make reservations 6 months in advance to avoid disappointment. The number of climbers is limited to 135 pax daily.

Website: http://www.sabahtourism.com/activity/climb-mt-kinabalu

3. Zipline

Take your love one all the way to Langkawi Island and get her to spend two and a half hours soaring along 12 different ziplines over the waterfalls and within the top and middle layer of the island’s rainforest. And with her adrenaline still high from gliding through an oxygen-rich forest,

can you imagine how incredible it is for her when she got off the line and the first thing she will see is you on bended knee with a ring in one hand? It’s worth a try, don’t you think so?

Umgawa is the island’s first world-class zipline eco-adventure tour, which offers spectacular views of Matchincang Peak, Seven Wells Waterfall and the Andaman Sea. Umgawa’s course features 12 ziplines, one double zipline, three sky-bridges suspended in the trees, and a spectacular descent from towering trees.

Website: www.umgawa.com

4. The Rainbow Skywalk

The Rainbow Skywalk is the talk of the town in Penang Island because it offers stunning seamless views of George Town and beyond. Located at George Town’s highest point, the open-air Rainbow Skywalk, a semi-circular glass-bottomed platform extending out from the edge of the Komtar tower is at Level 68, offering visitors the thrilling experience of walking on air 249m above ground.

Make the best of this venue and wait for the sun to set over the Penang Hill and beyond, or wait for the city of George Town to light up before you propose to your love one. I’ll bet it is going to be one of the most beautiful and romantic marriage proposals ever. But before you do that, please make sure your love one doesn’t have a fear of height. Then, you are good to go!

Website: https://thetop.com.my/rainbow-skywalk

5. Plane In The City

Located in the heart of the city at Jalan Bukit Bintang, Plane In The City, which is an an actual Boeing 737 aircraft, is listed in the Malaysia Book of Records as the 1st Aeroplane Restaurant in Malaysia.

The Plane In The City is the perfect venue to propose to your wife-to-be because just admit it, it won’t be as romantic as in the actual plane flying at 35,000 feet, right? With this real-life flight simulation, you don’t have to deal with small aisle or an unpredictable turbulence or crying babies, or being rejected in front of strangers of various nationalities. To make it more interesting, you can propose on the wing of the airplane, and that experience my friend, will be unforgettable.

Website: http://www.planeinthecity.com

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Categories
Tourism Malaysia

WALK ON WATER AT MARINA ISLAND RESORT, PANGKOR

To be honest, when I said walk on water, I meant it figuratively because Marina Island Resort is an artificial island that was built right on the sea. Am I right, or am I right? It is indeed a reclaimed land that was established on the coast of Teluk Muroh in Perak (northern part of the Peninsular Malaysia).

Let’s not dwell on how or even when it was built. Let me bring you straight to why it should be next in your list of holiday destination.

Oh, before I begin, this resort is definitely more fun to stay at if you come with your family or a group of friends. This is because almost every corner of this 316.9- acre of man-made island is filled with activities that its guests can participate in.

And these activities will be more fun and enjoyable if they are shared, you know like that famous quote by the late Chris McCandless – “Happiness is only real when shared.”

Frenzy Hippo Park

This water theme park is not one to miss when you stay at the resort. If I must say, it is the resort’s main attraction, really! This Frenzy Hippo Waterpark is larger than 24 badminton courts with 41 challenges. After going through all the slippery challenges, you will either end up looking like a “ninja warrior” or something that the cat dragged in. You won’t have much dignity left after you complete all the activities, that much I can tell you. However, it is undeniably an enjoyable and fun activity but at the same time a survival game for the fittest. Frenzy Hippo Waterpark is suitable for all ages.

Or you can just put on your sunglasses and let yourself drift on a float of all sizes and patterns at the lagoon. I saw many cute floats in various shapes such as pizza, unicorn and peacock at the waterpark. There are also kayaks, canoes, duck paddle boats and Yoyo boats for guests to try out on the calm seawater. New water activities will be added from time to time to make the waterpark more enjoyable. Currently, the price for this activity is RM20 per pax.

Fishing Pond

People say fishing is a lonely and solitary hobby but looking at the fishing activities at the fishing pond, it was as lively as a fish market. I saw a family of four bonding with each other through fishing and there wasn’t a single handphone in sight, isn’t that marvelous? They were teasing each other while the father was trying his best to attach a live bait to the hooks.

It is open 24 hours daily and if you are lucky, you will end up with a grouper fish weighing up to 20kg. For three hours of fishing, it will cost you around RM100.

ST Theme Park

Well, if fishing is not your thing, fret not because there is a family-oriented outdoor entertainment park near the fishing pond where there are plenty of motorised and non-motorised rides to play with.

ST Theme Park operates from 6 pm till midnight daily except on Monday. Decide on your vehicle of choice – the ATV, the Harley Bike, the decorated mini car, the Big Wheel, or rickshaw – or, if you are crazy like me, ride them all.

Those with children as young as one year old need not worry, either, because there are lots of kiddy cars for them to ride on. ST Theme Park may just be the “place” that will help strengthen the family bond.

Sunset Cruise

Spending three hours on a luxury boat cruising around the island of Pangkor was one of the main highlights of my stay at the Marina Island Resort. Accompanied by an experienced captain/sailor, who was also the owner of the catamaran, Rod, who hails from Australia, the cruise became much more fun and informative. He has so many sailor’s tales to tell, some of them were horrific but most of them were funny.

Unfortunately for me, the weather was not very cooperative that day so I didn’t get to see the sunset but I did get the chance to ride on Rod’s mini jet ski when the catamaran took a break in the middle of the ocean. It was exhilarating and felt much safer than the normal jet ski.

Don’t forget to bring your own snacks and drinks. The three-hour sunset cruise will cost you a total of RM180.

Giant Grouper Feeding

If you feel that feeding a fish is sort of therapeutic, you can visit the grouper fish pond at the marina. You just have to pay RM10 per pack of small fish to feed the giant grouper. There are about 10 of them and each weighs around 100 kg. After watching them eat, I am not sure this activity can be called therapeutic, it felt more like an adventure to me. You have to experience it yourself in order to know what I mean. The feeding times are at 9 am and 5 pm.

Group / Educational Activities

If you come in a huge group like for a team building, school trip and such, these are the kind of activities that are catered to your needs.

  1. Batik Painting – This activity will help you learn some basic points on batik. You will also be given a pre-set batik drawing to paint. Need I remind you that it is very addictive.

  2. Raft Building – You will get to learn how to build a raft from scratch for survival purposes.

  3. Camping and Bonfire – This activity is definitely ideal for school children to learn some basic outdoor skills in order to build their confidence and to learn how to be independent. They have to build their own tent, cook their own meals and start their own fire.

Accommodations

Well, as for accommodations, Marina Island Resort, Pangkor is home to 400 suites and hotel rooms spread within two wings comprising Superior Suite at D-Sea and Deluxe Suite at D’Ocean, as well as a series of luxury homes called Tiara Bay. Some of its bungalows are also listed under Airbnb.

Rockbund Fishing Chalet

From the name itself, I assume all of you can already guess what this cabin-like chalet was built for. You are right, it is a haven for fishing enthusiasts. Bear in mind, that this chalet is built with fishing enthusiasts in mind, so all 21 chalets offer only basic amenities. Each has its own deck where he or she can fish all day and night if he or she wishes to.

If fishing is not your thing, its quaint little fishing deck can be turned into a location for a romantic candle light dinner with a sunset view to die for or even a beautiful venue for a wedding. With the lovely pine trees and beautiful sunset, nature has indeed been generous to this place.

 

Food and Beverages

 

Terumbu Reef Restaurant

It offers a wide spread of buffet breakfast and all-day dining services. This restaurant specialises in Malay, Chinese and international dishes. Terumbu Reef Restaurant can fit up to 100 guests indoors and 150 guests outdoors.

D Pine Café @ Rockbund

Located at Rockbund Fishing Chalet in Marina Island, D’Pine Cafe offers breakfast, lunch, local and western cuisine for dinner, with indoor and outdoor seating. This restaurant is also famous for its fresh seafood BBQ.

How to get there

Car
Access Marina Island Pangkor Resort Hotel easily by navigating your way using these co-ordinates:
Latitude: 4.210492 Longitude: 100.603715

Or Waze it!

Marina Island Pangkor Resort Hotel
KM1, Jalan Utama Marina Island,
Teluk Muroh, 32200, Lumut, Perak.

Bus

Take a bus to Lumut then take a 15-minute taxi ride to Marina Island.
Take a Transnasional bus which leads you to Marina Island directly.
Photos are courtesy of Muizzuddin Maksah from Backpakerz.

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Categories
Tourism Malaysia

A WALK IN TANJUNG TUAN

 

The historic Tanjung Tuan – also known by its Portuguese name Cape Rachado – is a gazetted forest reserve popular amongst birdwatchers near and far.

The only coastal-forest in Melaka, Tanjung Tuan’s history, environment and geographical location makes it a unique location for hiking and bird watching.

Gazetted as a permanent reserve forest by the Forest Department of Melaka in 1921 (under the title of Cape Rachado Permanent Reserved Forest), Tanjung Tuan is managed by Kumpulan Melaka Bhd., and is situated approximately 20km from Port Dickson.

The main entrance to Tanjung Tuan.

The old virgin coastal-forest contains a rich and diverse population of flora and fauna (177 species of plants and trees have been recorded), and is known to be the ideal ‘pit-stop’ for migratory birds – especially raptors – on the East Asian-Australia Flyway.

It’s also been designated as an Important Bird Area by international non-profit organisation BirdLife International, and a Wildlife Sanctuary by Malaysia’s Department of Wildlife and National Parks (PERHILITAN).

Every year, the Malaysian Nature Society (MNS) organises the Raptor Watch to coincide with the raptors’ journey back to the northern hemisphere via Tanjung Tuan, with the aim of spreading awareness on the conservation of raptors and their habitats.

Following the main road uphill leads to the Cape Rachado lighthouse.

Walking uphill on the main paved road leads to the iconic Cape Rachado lighthouse – rebuilt in 1863 – and a cliff-top view of the Malacca Straits. The Portuguese established the site after they conquered Melaka in 1511, and the lighthouse was initially built to guide their ships across the Straits.

The Battle of Cape Rachado occurred just off the coast in 1606, and is an important historic site for Melaka. The naval battle between the Dutch-Johor coalition and the Portuguese marked the beginning of a series of conflicts which eventually led to the Portuguese relinquishing control of Melaka in 1641. Several ships were lost during the battle; in 1995, the Dutch ship Nassau was excavated from the area and is on display at Lukut Museum in Port Dickson.

A view of the Cape Rachado lighthouse.

The lighthouse is not accessible to visitors, but a walk around the compound reveals the battle site and a stunning view of the Straits of Malacca.

“We came here because it was said to be ‘photo-worthy’,” says one visitor as she admires the ‘blue lagoon’ with her friends. They discovered Cape Rachado and Tanjung Tuan online after looking for picturesque places to visit in Port Dickson. Birdwatching enthusiasts also note the scenic spot to be excellent for spotting migratory birds.

Signs inside the park educate visitors on the migratory birds that fly through Tanjung Tuan.

Picturesque views of the Straits of Malacca, hidden behind the lighthouse.

The two forest trails near the lighthouse lead to different areas of Tanjung Tuan, while the trail behind the structure descends to a secluded beach where Hang Tuah’s footprint can be found. Following the circuit leads to an old Dutch well, and a wooden staircase brings visitors back uphill, towards the main paved road.

Following the pathway towards the beach will eventually lead to another historic site known as the Mystical Well. Hang Tuah’s footprint can be found by following the stairs by the well.

Following the pathway towards the beach will eventually lead to another historic site known as the Mystical Well. Hang Tuah’s footprint can be found by following the stairs by the well.

The remains of the Old Dutch Well at Tanjung Tuan.

Stairs descending to the beach from Cape Rachado.

A no-frills campsite is also located by the beach and is open to the public. For just RM3, visitors are welcome to camp there, plus camping equipment is available onsite.

The other forest path is located before the lighthouse’s staircase and goes to Bukit Batu Putih; climbing the limestone rocks offers a different view of the ocean.

The view of the Straits of Malacca from the secluded beach.

Camping is allowed for a small fee. The park’s campsite is located near the secluded beach at Tanjung Tuan.

Exploring Tanjung Tuan takes several hours and children and adults of all ages can be seen enjoying the recreational park. Although some paths may be tricky for the very young – and certain elevated pathways may be difficult for those below average fitness – people looking for a ‘forest cleanse’, a dose of history, and a view of the ocean will find them all here.

Hutan Rekreasi Tanjung Tuan,
Tanjung Tuan, 71050,
Melaka.

Open daily, 7am-6pm. Entry fee, RM1.

www.forestry.gov.my

Source From :http://www.malaysia.my/index.php
Text and photos by Stacy Liu

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Categories
Tourism Malaysia

LIFE LESSONS IN RURAL MALAYSIA

As city dwellers, we are used to demanding for things to be done “yesterday.” We are so used to listening to the scripted customer service dialogue at fast-food counters that we’ve learned to tune it out. We are used to the mass-produced “nutrition” in polystyrene boxes. And no matter how much we “communicate” on our hi-technology gadgets, truthfully, we are actually distancing ourselves socially from more meaningful inter-personal connections.

Seriously, city life has become the bane of our existence. And I, too, have become a sad part of it! But at least I have learned to recognize it and done something about it.

My pill for life – which I pop whenever I feel I’ve become too stressed out, too deep in work, too “out of the loop,” irritated at the world – is a quick getaway. By that, I mean “get-away-as-far-from-the-city-as-possible-and-do-it-fast!”And it’s not just to any fancy resort of a certain star-rating. These places I go to are hardly rated at all. In fact, they’re not made of glitzy perfection; they don’t have turn-down service, butlers lurking at every corner nor room service.

But that hasn’t stopped them from offering the warmest and most welcoming hospitality I know. I’m talking about the more than 3,000 kind families scattered around Malaysia’s kampungs who have graciously opened up their homes to total strangers like me looking for a genuine Malaysian experience. They call it the Malaysian homestay programme. I call it first-class hospitality.

In my escape of the clutches of city-life, I have ventured to several Malaysian kampungs that have taken part in this national tourism venture, meant to give the rural population a piece of the tourism pie. The programme has actually been well-received and today, 15 years after it was first introduced in Pahang, there are more than 200 villages listed under the programme.

They have all been pleasant experiences to remind me that a satisfying life is more about being in the present moment rather than in the pursuit of the next promotion, the next big gadget, the next sleek car.

I felt this most when I was making my way to Kampung Pantai Suri in Kelantan. We had to abandon our car for a more eco-friendly transportation. From the Kok Majid jetty, we glided slowly down the Sungai Kelantan estuary on a long boat (it was the only way to get to the village). Along the way, we passed sandbanks, wooden bridges, and the sight of young boys diving off a tree into the river in wild abandon. The splashes, their gleeful laughter, the friendly teases exchanged among them reminded me of a life less cluttered.

But it’s not just the children who know how to enjoy life. Even the elder folks have a deep sense of appreciation for the present. They know that they’ve worked hard, and they know that their bodies deserve a good respite. Despite the urban dwellers high-flying life in the cities, it is these folks in these older parts of Malaysia who lead much more enriching and full lives.

At the end of my stay at Kampung Pantai Suri, I was rushing off to board the boat home. On the way, I passed by a group of elders joking and laughing away under the shade of a huge mango tree. It was high noon and the heat was searing but the shade beneath the tree was a cool place to relax. These folks were sitting around hacking away the tops of coconuts to get to the juice and fleshy insides.

They saw me in my rush and called me to slow down and join them. Not wanting to miss my boat, I hesitated, but finally, their jovial demeanour and cheery calls won me over. “If you miss this one, you can take the next boat,” they said. So I sat with them as they selected a coconut for me to drink. It dawned on me that we sometimes lead our lives with clock-work precision that we forget to stop and drink the coconuts, so to speak.

This was as natural as it gets. The wind to cool me off, instead of the air-conditioning; a leafy, shady tree overhead, instead of a zinc roof; and fresh coconut juice in my hands, instead of those mocktail glasses with the little umbrellas stuck in them.

The kampung folk’s hospitality is legendary in Malaysia. When you check in at one of the homestay kampungs, you’ll notice that it’s like coming home to your grandparent’s home for Hari Raya. Some people may find the idea of staying at a stranger’s home rather awkward, but whatever they say about Malaysian hospitality being genuine and warm is true – in fact, they could possibly put public relations agencies to shame! It doesn’t take long to bond and you’ll immediately feel like part of the family. Many “host families” and their guests have parted ways in tears at the end of their homestay duration. I know I have…!

Another thing in abundance here in these traditional villages is time. Things around here move at a slightly slower pace than in the city. An entire morning can be dedicated to the preparation of lunch. On one occasion, the womenfolk who were neighbours with each other congregated at their friend’s kitchen and commenced their preparation of the day’s meal. Amid their twittering gossips, teasing banter, the peeling, cutting and slicing of a variety of herbs, leaves and spices, and the steaming pots of what-not from the stove, lunch slowly took on the form of a feast! Just another example of teamwork at its best!

Despite being in a kampung, you’d be surprised at the variety of things to do. Each kampung is unique, has its own traditions and cuisine heritage (depending on its location in Malaysia) and lifestyle. Some of the villages are set near jungle, others may be by the sea or river. Some may be surrounded by paddy fields or fruit orchards.

A host family at Kampung Haji Dorani has their own paddy field and during the harvesting season, I had a chance to help them out in gathering the crop. I considered it as my little contribution to alleviating world hunger, and took great pride in it! They also happened to have a small fruit orchard and many an evening was spent on the patio of the house peeling away the skin of the mangoes to reveal the juicy, golden flesh beneath. There’s just something so satisfying about picking your own fruit, harvesting your own rice and catching your own fish for the night’s dinner. This is exactly what they’ve been saying about the farm-to-table concept, and there I was living the life!

The afternoons are usually my favourite time because that’s when I get to spend time with the village kids. At Kampung Batu Laut near Banting, Selangor, the children would rush down to the beach after school and practice their sailing skills. These kids are being groomed to be the next sailors and sea captains and some of them have excelled so well as to compete in sailing competitions worldwide!

Despite the age difference, there’s a whole lot to be learned from these kids — about creativity (fashioning kites from bamboo) and teamwork (building a raft made of old tires). It was way better than those corporate training sessions in hotel meeting rooms!

The Malaysian homestay experience may have some similarities with the bed and breakfast concept in Europe, but I dare say that we’ve perfected it. It’s not only a retreat for those wanting to escape the city, it’s a lesson in life about humanity, patience, and for us, Malaysians, our heritage and traditions.

So if you find yourself stuck in life, corporate meetings, a 4×4 cubicle, traffic jams, or whatnot, perhaps it’s time to take a little drive back to our kampungs and learn to enjoy the simple pleasures of life again.

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