Categories
Malaysia Travel Guide

Little Known Secrets of the Beads of Borneo

From the Zulu warriors in South Africa, to the ancient Egyptians of North Africa, to the pilgrims of the Middle East or South America, beads have a presence in many cultures but the one commonality is that they have always been more than an eye-catching accessory. The story of the beads of Borneo is no exception.

For many cultures, they were a currency, or perhaps a sign of faith, a symbol of wealth or a family heirloom to be treasured for future generations. Whatever the purpose, the one consistency is that they are always a way of expression.

Sarawak in Malaysian Borneo has a unique relationship with the beads of Borneo. Although there isn’t any definitive evidence of when exactly the beads came to the region, there is evidence to suggest beads were first used in Borneo by visiting sailors for bartering. Back then, beads were made out of shells, teeth, bones and stones that were perforated and worn as ornaments.

Some Sarawak tribes believe that the longer a bead lasts, the more powerful it becomes and the bearer can draw strength from the bead. However, to do so, the bearer must have a strong soul.

Source: Sarawak Tourism Board

There are over 30 tribes in Sarawak and each tribe has its own way of adorning themselves with beads. Some of them use them as necklaces, others as beaded head caps or beaded skirts, others as bracelets or even rings. Beads would also be used as decorations during festivals or other big gatherings.

The baby carriers used by Orang Ulu women to carry their infants are adorned with beadwork and finishes made out of wild boar or leopard teeth. Apart from indicating status, the tingling of the Hawk’s bells and large beads attached to the upper rim of the carrier would soothe the toddler on long journeys through the rain forest.

Many of the antique beads of Borneo are hard to find now. There are a number of reasons for this. Historically, the beads were sometimes buried with their owners as part of their grave clothes, or as “grave gifts”, for the deceased to use in their long journey to the underworld.

As mentioned, beads were also used as currency, often traded with visiting sailors or lost in the sometimes devastating longhouse fires that could rip through 100 doors in less than an hour.

As beads were increasingly hard to come by and time became a precious commodity, modern day beads are mostly imported from Indonesia and China, according to Heidi Munan, Sarawak Museum’s curator of beads. However they are still influenced by the original beads of Borneo.

So while these new beads are still traded, they are no longer the currency of trade. And despite being mass produced, they are increasingly expensive yet have little of the character of the original beads. At the same time, the number of communities still making the beads of Borneo in the traditional manner is slowly diminishing.

Preserving the traditionality of beadmaking

However, the Lun Bawang community in Long Tuma village, Lawas, northern Sarawak continues to make ceramic beads the way they’ve always been made. Partly to generate income for the community but also because they want to keep the tradition alive and let everyone have the opportunity to wear the beads during traditional festivities.

The process begins with a group of five women wading almost nonchalantly into the crocodile infested waters of Pa’ Lawas river to find and dig up the smooth fine clay, which they call “tanah salit”.

The clay is taken to the village by hand, pounded and kneaded to the right consistency and shaped into tiny beads, roughly the size of a pea. The beads are then sun-dried, and strung up on wire loops and fired in a backyard bonfire.

Patricia Busak, daughter of Litad Muluk, who manages the ceramic beads centre, was interviewed by the Star newspaper some time ago and talked through the process, “It takes at least three pairs of hands to make just one bead: one to gather and process the river clay before shaping it into beads; another to paint the underglaze pattern; and a third to paint the glaze and arrange the beads in an electric kiln at the community-owned workshop in the village.”

She went on to say, “It’s very specialised; for instance, only three women in our group are skilled at rolling the beads. I can’t roll, but I’m good at painting the pattern.”

The Long Tuma women are the only beadmakers in Sarawak. Even though their business is thriving, the most important thing for the Lun Bawang community, is the opportunity to preserve their heritage.

“The kind of beads we have, how we string and wear them, give us our sense of identity as a Lun Bawang,” concludes Patricia in the interview.

Beads of Borneo - Painting a bead

Source: Borneo Talk, “The Glistening Beads Of Kampung Long Tuma”

Because beads have been used for so long and came from various parts of the world, the types of beads found in Sarawak vary. Here are a few examples of the types of beads you should look out for during your time in Sarawak and especially if you go to a festival.

Lukut Sekala

The Lukut Sekala beads are worn almost exclusively by members of the Kayan tribe. These beads serve as a symbol of longevity to the community. This is because the beads last for so long that they have become heirlooms, passed down through multiple generations.

Source: @taytayxanadu on Carousell

There are also the Lukut Bela Laba, which are considered male or female depending on whether the shape of the bead was long or flat. The beads are considered extremely valuable. These beads are often of great value to the Kayan.

According to legend, a trader who wanted to travel by river to the interior of Sarawak bought a second-hand outboard engine with just one Lukut Sekala bead.

Beads of Borneo - bead designs

Source: Rustic Borneo Travel, “Borneo Beads – Beautiful Status Symbols”

Ba’o Rawir

The Ba’o Rawir, or the drinking straw beads are created by Kelabit ladies. The Kelabit tribe originates from the Bario Highlands located in the northernmost part of Sarawak. The Kelabit people have a close association with the Lun Bawang tribe as they are geographically close to one another.

The Ba’o Rawir beads are used to create intricate designs on the Peta, a hat worn by Kelabit ladies. It is a status symbol which had the equivalent value of one buffalo in the old days when owning a buffalo was considered a sign of wealth. Today, an antique Peta hat made out of Ba’o Rawir can fetch up to RM 30,000 (US$ 7,150).

Beads of Borneo - Kelabit woman head gear

Source: Kelabit Wiki, “Peta”

Experience bead making yourself

Located in the north of Sarawak, the Long Tuma village is close to the Brunei border. The Ceramic Bead Centre holds workshops where you can learn how to make the beads and create your own piece. The Beads centre is currently managed by Litad Muluk and her daughter Patricia who is quoted above.

These women work the fields during the day and use the bead centre as an extra income stream while keeping the tradition alive. You can even see how this group of dedicated women put together beautiful pieces of jewellery.

And if you like what you see, you can support their efforts by purchasing beads from the souvenir shop.

Here is where it’s located:
Pusat Kraftangan Manik Seramik
Kampung Long Tuma, 98850 Lawas, Sarawak
Tel: +6013 565 6951

If you’re interested to learn more about the beading culture of Borneo, Heidi Munan’s book on Bornean beads is a highly recommended read. In it, she explains the historic significance of beads and how they transcend its mere aesthetic appeal.

You can also order beads online and support the Lawas bead community at the same time. These 3 online stores offer authentic products sourced from Sarawak:

  1. Gerai OA
  2. Gaya Borneo
  3. Bonita and the Beads
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Article source: http://sarawaktourism.com/blog/feed/

Categories
Travel to Melaka

IMPRESSION CITY BY END 2017

Yong Tai Berhad : bullish on Impression City
     
02/24/2016 | 03:12 am
KUALA LUMPUR: YONG Tai Bhd expects its RM5.4 billion project in Malacca to generate net profit margin of 20 per cent, which would help to sustain the company’s earnings in the long term.

The garment maker-turned-property developer, which has been loss- making for several years, expects to return to the black this year with contribution coming from the real estate sector.

The company, which has pockets of developments in the Klang Valley and Johor, is planning to develop Impression City on a 47.03ha site in Malacca.

The project would be developed in 11 phases and over 10 years, said its executive director Boo Kuang Loon.

Construction for Phase 1 would start in the third quarter of this year and feature retail and commercial units, said Boo at a luncheon hosted by MIDF Amanah Investment Bank Bhd, here, yesterday.

It is expected to have a gross development value of RM1.1 billion,

The catalyst for the commercial-led Impression City is the Impression Melaka performing arts theatre, to be built on the 47.03ha site.

Construction of Impression Melaka, the jewel of the company, will start next month at a cost of RM300 million and includes land acquisition. The opening is slated for end-2017.

Boo said although Impression Melaka required a huge capital investment, the returns would be long term and attractive.

It would take two years to construct and the projected returns would start from 2018 onwards, he added.

With 15 million tourists visiting Malacca annually, Yong Tai hopes to attract at least 1.1 million visitors to Impression Melaka, with 40 per cent coming from China.

The company is also targeting visitors from Southeast Asia (30 per cent), Asia (20 per cent) and the rest from the Middle East, Europe and the United States.

“With two shows a day and tickets priced at RM120 per person, we are poised to achieve a revenue of RM140 million a year, including the sale of souvenirs and merchandise. For this business, we are targeting a profit margin of 50 per cent. This would net us a profit of around RM60 million a year.

“There are many more upsides, such as increasing the ticket prices and having up to four shows a day. This is the potential of Yong Tai in the future,” said Boo.

“For the next two years we are at the investing stage and would generate profits. But the profits would not be much to give dividends,” he said.

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default

Categories
Cuisine in Melaka

MELAKA TARGETS 14 MILLION VISITORS IN 2013

Melaka records 6.8 mil tourist arrivals, confident of 14 mil target

Posted on 1 October 2013 – 04:28pm
Last updated on 1 October 2013 – 04:57pm

MELAKA (Oct 1, 2013): Melaka has recorded 6.8 million domestic and foreign tourist arrivals during the first six months of this year, from 6.7 million in the corresponding period last year, Chief Minister Datuk Idris Haron told the State Assembly today.

He said the state was targeting new markets, like the Middle East and Africa, with efforts being made to attract more tourists from the affected countries to come to Melaka.

“The (state) government is confident of achieving this year’s target of 14 million tourist arrivals, compared with 13.7 million last year,” he said in his motion of thanks on the speech by the Yang Dipertua Negeri of Melaka, Tun Mohd Khalil Yaakob when opening the Melaka State Assembly sitting.

He called on all quarters to play their role to achieve the target and not to politicise issues, like the case on the closing of Jonker Walk which was aimed to reduce traffic congestion in the area.

Idris said efforts were also being made by the state government to attract more investors and negotiations were in progress with giant companies, like Microsoft and Guardian, to get them to invest in Melaka.

The state government is also discussing with a company from Spain to build a renewable energy plant, involving investment of RM2 billion, he added.

Bernama

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default

Categories
Tourism Malaysia

Newly Toast Box Cafe during Dedap area of Taman Johor Jaya, Johor Bahru.

The newly open Toast Box Cafe (N1 32.368 E103 48.263on 1st Aug 2013 is located during a dilemma of Jalan Dedap 13 Dedap 8, Tmn Johor Jaya. We were invited by media for a Grand Opening Ceremony of a Cafe.

 print ToastBoxJohorJaya-ThelargeststoreinSouthEastAsia_zps611fcbc4.jpg

The community of Johor Jaya is greeted by a attract of Traditional Nanyang Coffee (Kopi in local terms), and Kaya Toast in a complicated country environment with a opening of a code new Toast Box store during Johor Jaya. Being a second store to open in Johor Bahru other than a one during KSL City Mall, it is now a largest Toast Box in South East Asia.
 

This new store is a poignant miracle in Toast Box’s skeleton to bringing a particular Traditional Nanyang enlightenment to opposite tools of Asia, providing a colourful community a robust and singular dining knowledge with a spirit of nostalgia.
 

Established in Dec 2005, a initial Toast Box opening was located in Food Republic Wisma Atria and has grown usually with a singular concept. To date, Toast Box has 57 outlets in Singapore and 34 outlets in China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Taiwan, Philippines and Thailand.

 print ToastBoxJohorJayasendearingambience_zps52161c43.jpg

Breeze into Toast Box during Johor Jaya and be bewitched by a fun of aged style, infrequent dining knowledge in a uncomplicated nonetheless endearing ambience. Sharing a attract of Traditional Nanyang Kopi and Toast enlightenment with customers, Toast Box strives to broach a best kopi and toast, creation each revisit a tasty wander down memory lane.

We like a atmosphere and a country emblem really much. Felt like a English setting…especially all in white color…

The Grand Opening debate by Mr Vincent Lim (???), Senior Vice President of Toast Box (Global), Mr James Quek (???), Chief Executive Officer of Bakery Division (Global), BreadTalk Pte Ltd and followed by a Guest Of Honor – YB Liow Cai Tung (???), State Assembly Woman for Johor Jaya.

 print VincentLimSenorVicePresidentofToastBoxGlobal_zpsb2bc5f0e.jpg

The proof of Nanyang Coffee brewing came after a speech. I’m so bewail that my hardisk crashed few days ago that all my photos left with it and we can't uncover we a approach they decoction their signature coffee…apologies.

 print VincentLimshowcaseshisKopipullingskilltogetherwithToastBoxscoffeemasters_zpsabd2fe3f.jpg

 print L-RJamesQuekYBLiowCaiTungampVincentLimmakeatoastwithTraditionalNanyangKopitoofficiatethegrandopeningofToastBoxJohorJaya_zps08a38ffb.jpg

Each of us have a possibility to ambience a coffee after it…taste nice!

 print IMG_0093_zps69bbadf9.jpg

Beside a coffee, a cafeteria do offer others like Peanuts Butter Thick Toast, Laksa Mee Tai Mak, Homemade Nasi Lemak with Chicken Wing, Curry Chicken with rice or Baguette. Their Thick Toast all are cut with a density of accurate 2cm, pronounced by Mr Vincent Lim – Senior Vice President of Toast Box.

Toast Box is charity a special promotion of 10% off with a smallest of RM5 spent from now until 31st Aug 2013. This graduation is usually current during Toast Box Johor Jaya.

 print MediamembersenjoytastingToastBoxssignaturesandofferings_zps2563323e.jpg

The primogenitor association of Toast Box is Breadtalk from Singapore, here is some write adult about Breadtalk…

Founded as an FB user in Singapore in 2000 and listed on a SGX in 2003, BreadTalk Group Limited has fast stretched to turn a particular domicile code owners that has determined a symbol on a universe theatre with a bakery, grill and food atrium footprints. Its code portfolio comprises BreadTalk, Toast Box, Food Republic, Din Tai Fung, The Icing Room, RamenPlay, Thye Moh Chan and Carl’s Jr China. With tellurian staff strength of 7,000 employees, a Group has a network of 700 FB outlets in 15 countries such as Singapore, China, Hong Kong and a Middle East. It also operates Michelin Star awardee, Din Tai Fung, with tighten to 20 restaurants in Singapore and Thailand, as good as over 50 award-winning Food Republic food atriums in Singapore, China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Taiwan and Thailand.

Do try out a new judgment of cafeteria during Taman Johor Jaya, we might like a dishes and a deco that is singular during a Dedap area…

Article source:

Categories
Cuisine in Melaka

MELAKA AIMS FOR 12.5 MILLION TOURISTS IN 2012

Malacca sees 13.3pc rise in tourist arrivals

By Syawal Syahrin | [email protected] 0 comments

4 MILLION IN FOUR MONTHS: Chinese, Singaporeans and Indonesians among top arrivals

MALACCA: More than four million tourists visited the state in the first four months of this year, an increase of 13.3 per cent compared with the same period in 2011.
Chief Minister Datuk Seri Mohd Ali Rustam said of the 4.11 million tourists, 2.92 million were domestic tourists while the rest were foreigners.

“From January to April last year, Malacca saw some 3.62 million tourists visiting the state.

“But this year, for the same corresponding period, we saw an increase of 481,217 visitors.

“Foreign tourists saw a sharp increase of 37.3 per cent or 321,441, while domestic visitors grew by 5.8 per cent or 159,776 people,” he said.

Based on a report by the State Tourism Department, Ali said the top five foreign country tourist arrivals were China with 222,999 tourists, Singapore (185,277), Indonesia (168,190), Taiwan (108,128) and Hong Kong (57,241).

“As for the domestic tourists, the bulk of them were from Selangor, which recorded 773,271 tourists, followed by Kuala Lumpur with 666,520 tourists and Johor stands at the third place with 484,748 tourists.”

In the area of health tourism, Ali said some 141,602 people had sought treatment from three major private hospitals in the state — Mahkota Medical Centre, Putra Specialist Hospital and the Pantai Hospital Ayer Keroh.

“This figures comprises 81.6 per cent of the total number of tourists who came to Malacca to seek medical attention, with a majority of them coming from Indonesia with 29,789 people.

“Other foreigners who come here for medical tourism are from Singapore, China, Middle East and also Bangladesh.”

Ali also said museums in the state were the most popular attraction among tourists as they attracted 312,058 people, followed by the Malacca River Cruise (279,338 visitors), Malacca Zoo (176,943) and Menara Taming Sari (169,340).

Ali said the state government’s initiative in developing a variety of attractions had resulted in the drastic rise of tourists in this state, thus making Malacca a must-visit state in Malaysia.

“Besides this, several tourism aspects such as hygiene, tourists’ safety and communication facilities were crucial factors in attracting tourists to the state.

“Our ‘Think Tourism and Act Tourism’ initiative also managed to get the people to realise the importance of tourism to the state’s economy and this, too, is vital in ensuring we remain on top in the country’s tourism scene.”

This year, he said the state aims to attract 12.5 million tourists.

Article source: http://tourism-melaka.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default