Categories
Tourism Malaysia

Things To Do In The Month of Merdeka

In Malaysia, Independence Day is celebrated on 31 August every year. Why is it important to celebrate our Independence Day? For us, it is a day to remember all we as a nation have been through, as well as to demonstrate the significance of freedom and remind us of the sacrifices of our ancestors. By celebrating our Independence Day, we are acknowledging and owning the long and complicated history of our country. The whole month of August is actually dedicated to celebrating Malaysia’s independence.

For tourists to have a better understanding of Malaysia’s history, this is the right month to visit Malaysia.

So, let’s dedicate the whole month of August to learning about the history of Malaysia by doing these activities:

Visit the Proclamation of Independence Memorial

Proclamation of Independence Memorial

It can be said that the Proclamation of Independence Memorial is a building that safeguards many precious secrets in its vaults. The memorial exist as a reflection of a page in history from the struggle for independence to the great moments at Padang Pahlawan in Bandar Hilir, Melaka.

The two-storey building houses and exhibits historic documents ranging from the era of Melaka Malay Sultanate right up to the eve of independence in 1957. The exhibits here include collection of manuscripts, videotapes and other audio and visual collections.

The Memorial building, which was established on the mutual collaboration between the Melaka State Government and the National Archives of Malaysia, is surrounded by historical by historical remnants and structures such as the A’ Famosa Fort, St. Paul’s Hill, Padang Pahlawan Square and the Cultural Museum, which is a replica model of the Melaka Malay Sultanate Palace.

This is the place all Malaysians must go at least once in their lifetime. Admission is free.

Opening Hours: 09:00 am – 17:30 pm (Closed every Monday except on public holidays)

The Proclamation of Independence Memorial
Address:
Jalan Parameswara, 75000 Melaka, Malaysia
Tel: +606 284 1231

Get a Closer Look at the Merdeka Obelisk

Merdeka Obelisk

IT IS one of the most significant monuments of the country’s independence from colonial Britain but sadly, not many people notice it.

The little triangular structure called the Merdeka Obelisk stands forlornly in the shadow of yet another crass commercial development that Malacca is fast gaining notoriety for.

The obelisk marks the spot where H. G. Hammet, the last British resident commissioner of Malacca, handed over the instrument of independence to the state’s first local governor, Leong Yew Koh (later Tun) on Aug 31, 1957.

Then Chief Minister of Malacca Datuk Kurnia Jasa Osman Talib read the Proclamation of Independence after which the flags of the Federation of Malaya and state were raised.

The memorial with the letter “M” (for Merdeka) in the centre of a 11-pointed star, also indicates where Tunku Abdul Rahman first announced the date of Independence on Feb 20, 1956, after returning from his successful talks in London.

Merdeka Obelisk
Address:
Padang Pahlawan (Warrior’s Field),
Bandar Hilir, 75000, Melaka.

Story and Photo are credited to The Star.

Visit the Army Museum, Port Dickson

Military Museum – Negeri Sembilan

Visiting this Army Museum can be a surreal encounter that all Malaysians should experience at least once in our lifetime. It will evoke a sense of patriotism and pride in all of us. Why this museum you asked, well, this Army Museum does a good job to show us key moments of Malaysian history and also the heroism of our warriors.

The Army Museum, known locally as Muzium Tentera Darat, is located next to a military base off the main road at 5th mile, about 7km away from Port Dickson town in Sirusa district. A property of the Malaysian Royal Armed Forces, the museum traces Malaysia’s exploits and achievements through history, trumped up with dramatised aspects and romantic story-telling.

Get to know Lieutenant Adnan Saidi who was a Malayan soldier of the 1st Infantry Brigade which fought the Japanese in Pasir Panjang and Bukit Chandu and regarded by Malaysians and Singaporeans as a national hero. Learn about the modern day heroes who saved the American soldiers during the Battle of Mogadishu, an incident that was later made into a movie called Black Hawk Down. All these stories are proudly displayed at the museum.

MUZIUM TENTERA DARAT – NEGERI SEMBILAN

There are two blocks of buildings housing four galleries each, taking visitors from era to era. The museum use yellow footprints to guide you through the two-storey twin buildings so that chronological order is maintained. One of the galleries is dedicated to the era of the Melaka Sultanate, while another gallery tells the tale of British Malaya, and the various local heroes and freedom fighters. Other galleries are dedicated to the time of the formation of the Malay army, the time of the Japanese occupation and the communist insurgency.

Another interesting feature is a re-created mock-up of a communist underground tunnel. You walk down into the ground and into a darkened tunnel which has a communist sentry, surgery room, mock operations room and ammunition store.

In addition to the museum buildings, the spacious grounds also house decommissioned military vehicles, including planes, tanks and artillery guns, and a memorial fountain dedicated to soldiers who served through Malaysia’s war history. Children will love this museum because they can climb into some of the military vehicles and take pictures too.

Open daily from morning till evening, entry is free for all visitors.

Muzium Tentera Darat
Batu 4, Kem Si Rusa
71050 Port Dickson.
Tel: 06 – 647 1266 samb. 2482

Visit Tugu Negara (National Monument)

Situated overlooking the KL Lake Gardens, the huge bronze monument was built to pay tribute to the valiant soldiers who gave their lives defending the country during the Communist Insurgency in the 1950s. It was designed by Felix de Weldon, the architect of the famous Iwo Jima Memorial

One place with patriotic significance that Malaysians rarely visit is the Tugu Negara or National Monument. Deeply rooted in Malaysia’s history, the National Monument (Tugu Negara) stands tall and proud as a testament of the sacrifices that we as a nation have gone through. Visiting this place can bring back mixed feelings, memories of struggles, moments of triumphs and at the same time sadness as we remember all those who died for the country.

Located in Jalan Tugu, off Jalan Parlimen, Tugu Negara was built for RM1.5mil and was officially unveiled on Feb 8, 1966. Malaysia’s first Prime Minister, the late Tunku Abdul Rahman, was inspired to build a monument after visiting the Marine Corps War Memorial in Virginia, United States in Oct 1960.

He believed it was essential to commemorate those who had perished defending the country, particularly during WWII and the Malayan Emergency from 1948 to 1960. It was reported that about 11,000 civilians and security forces were killed during that time.

The monument was designed by the late Tan Sri Felix de Weldon, an American sculptor of Austrian origin who had worked on the Marine Corps War Memorial. The construction of Tugu Negara began in 1963.

The bronze sculpture depicts a group of seven soldiers. In the middle stands a soldier in a victorious pose, his right hand holding a Malaysian flag (made from cloth). The height of the monument is 15m, making it the biggest freestanding bronze sculpture in the world.

The soldiers symbolise leadership, suffering, unity, vigilance, strength, courage and sacrifice. The statues are erected on stones imported from the coastal city of Karlshamn, Sweden.

The base of the monument is made from granite and bears the Malayan Coat of Arms, of which both sides are engraved with the inscription: “Dedicated to the heroic fighters in the cause of peace and freedom; May the blessing of Allah be upon them.”

At Tugu Negara, there are two monuments to take note of as you enter the compound. The first is a 10m-high cenotaph (an empty tomb or monument erected to honour the dead) which stands at the upper entrance of the National Monument, on a seven- tiered rectangular base.

The inscription at the bottom, “To Our Glorious Dead (1914–1918), (1939–1945) and the Emergency (1948–1960)”, testifies to Malaysia’s involvement in a number of wars, including both World Wars and and also the Malayan Emergency, a guerilla war between the Commonwealth armed forces and the military arm of the Malayan Communist Party.

Interestingly, the cenotaph was originally placed at Jalan Sultan Hishamuddin (formerly called Victoria Avenue) near the old Kuala Lumpur Railway Station. It was later moved to its current site to make way for the construction of a flyover connecting Jalan Sultan Hishamuddin and the Parliament roundabout.

Names of the fallen are engraved on the plaques of the cenotaph as a token of tribute to their sacrifices.

Getting to the National Monument is relatively easy. Hop on the KTM train and get off at the Bank Negara Station. Follow the signage to Jalan Parlimen or Botanical Lake Garden. It will take about 15 minutes by foot or five minutes by taxi.

Another option is to take the Kuala Lumpur Hop-on, Hop-off bus from Jalan Bukit Bintang. One of the stops is the National Monument. You can explore the area for a bit and then take the next bus to continue the city tour of Kuala Lumpur.

The cheapest way is to take the metro to the Old Railway Station. From there it is a 10/15 minute walk to the entrance of the wonderful Lake Gardens, one of the biggest parks in Kuala Lumpur. It will take another 15/25 minutes to walk through the park to the north entrance where it is only a 5/10 minute walk to the National Monument.

Daily opening hours are between 7am and 6pm.

Tugu Negara
Address: Jalan Parlimen, Kuala Lumpur 50480 Malaysia
Tel: +603-2615-8188

Story is credited to The Star.

Stay the Night at Federal Hotel, Kuala Lumpur

Nestled among other modern skyscrapers that dominated the Kuala Lumpur’s famous shopping and entertainment district, Bukit Bintang, the Federal Hotel’s old-fashioned architecture really looks out of place.

However, the building’s unassuming facade betrays a rich historical trail. Back in the day, Malaysia’s first Prime Minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman intended the hotel to be a world-class accommodation for the distinguished guests who would be gracing the historic celebration that marked the handover of Malaya from the British.

Completed three days before the country’s independence in 1957, Federal Hotel’s first registered guest was British government official Nancy Simmons. Affectionately known as Bunny, she chauffeured Tunku during his official visits to negotiate Malaya’s independence in London. One of its famous guest was the former world heavyweight boxing champion, the late Muhammad Ali.

The hotel’s iconic restaurant, the Mandarin Palace was even featured in a Hollywood movie called “The Seventh Dawn” in 1964.

Federal Hotel
Address: 35, Bukit Bintang Street,
Bukit Bintang, 55100 Kuala Lumpur
Tel: 03-2148 9166

Fly the Jalur Gemilang campaign

NATIONAL DAY CELEBRATION – MERDEKA SQUARE, KUALA LUMPUR

In order to nurture the spirit of patriotism in all of us, let’s participate in the Fly the Jalur Gemilang, our national flag campaign. This year, the state of Melaka has been selected as the venue for the launch of the 2019 National Month and Fly the Jalur Gemilang campaign scheduled for 3 Aug 2019.

In keeping with this year’s theme for National Day, which is “Sayangi Malaysiaku – Malaysia Bersih”, we can safely say that flying the Malaysian flag proudly can be a symbol of our love for the country. Jalur Gemilang should be given the utmost respect and dignity as it symbolises national sovereignty, unity and national pride.

So let’s fly our flag on our vehicles, office cubicles, houses, restaurants, hotels, etc throughout the whole month of August. Some tourists collected flag of the country they visited so this a good opportunity to get a free Jalur Gemilang to add to your flag collection.

Watching the Independence Day Parade

This coming 31 August 2019 marks the 62nd anniversary of Malaysia’s national independence. Known locally as Hari Kemerdekaan, it is the time of the year when Malaysians show their appreciation for yet another year of harmony among the people, and are reminded of their country’s struggle for independence.

This national event helps to educate the public, especially the younger generation, about the importance of racial tolerance, unity and cooperation so that the country can continue to enjoy prosperity, development and harmony.

The annual celebrations will not be complete without the pomp and splendour of the traditional procession. On Independence Day itself, the national day parade will take place at Wilayah Persekutuan Putrajaya at 7 am in the presence of Their Majesties, the King and Queen of Malaysia. The VIPs gracing the occasion are the Hon. Prime Minister of Malaysia, Malaysian cabinet ministers, foreign ambassadors and other dignitaries. Although Putrajaya is the celebration’s epicenter, expect smaller Hari Kemerdekaan celebrations all over the country to include parades and fireworks.

Among those who participate in this parade are government services such as the military, the police force, naval forces, public and private sectors’ staff and school children.

The day will be filled with a procession, cultural performances, military demonstration, intricate floats, and other interesting diversions. So, don your patriotic gear and grab a flag and start waving it!

The closing of Independence Month 2019 will be held in Kuching, Sarawak on 16 September, as it is the date that the federation of Malaysia was formed in 1963. Everyone can expect another lineup of fun patriotic activities that will pump up his/her patriotism.

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

Categories
Tourism Malaysia

TOP 5 TRADITIONAL MALAYSIAN VILLAGES TO VISIT NEAR KUALA LUMPUR

Want to get to know the real Malaysia? Why not take a trip outside of Kuala Lumpur’s city limits. Within less than two hours, you will find yourself in some pretty amazing countryside or “kampung” located in the Central Region (Selangor and Negeri Sembilan). Here, you can play like a kid again, enjoy nature, breathe fresh air and really be present in the moment.

Malaysian kampungs are usually small settlements of wooden dwellings in the rural parts of Malaysia. Despite their humble beginnings, modern facilities for clean water, electricity and telecommunications are available.

You’ll immediately notice that kampung life is a far cry from urban routines. Village folk are more in touch with nature and live by the seasons and surrounding environment. They engage in activities such farming, cooking using naturally organic products without relying on highly processed ingredients, fishing, carpentry, traditional folk games, making handicrafts and more.

If you are wondering how you can experience the peace and serenity of a simple kampung life in Malaysia, read on.

Under the Malaysian Government’s Homestay Experience programme, tourists can easily get a dose of life in the village. The programme registers a few hundred villages that have expressed interest in hosting tourists in their private homes to provide them a glimpse of life in Malaysia’s beautiful countryside.

Step into these homes and you will be quickly adopted as their “foster child,” taking care of your needs during your entire stay with them. Essentially, you get to live with a local Malaysian family and really understand the heart of a Malaysian.

The villages in the central region are easily accessible from Kuala Lumpur. Most are within a two-hour drive of the city. Check out some top villages here:

1. Kampung Sungai Sireh, Selangor

This peaceful hamlet of about 1,000 acres is surrounded by nature. Your eyes will be soothed by the green wetlands forest reserve and the carpet of ripening paddy crops ready to be harvested in May and September. The nearby rivers, irrigation canals and sea further add to the charm of this small village.

Local activities are closely attached to the surrounding landscapes. As a guest under the Malaysia Homestay programme, your host family will likely take you out for a trek into the wetlands area. Be prepared to get wet, but you will love the opportunity to observe the unique flora and fauna in the area. Alternatively, explore the rivers in a kayak and let yourself be drifted slowly by the currents as you try to spot the wildlife here.

The village-folk are especially proud of the irrigation system used for the paddy crops – they’ll be more than happy to show you the Korean technology involved. What’s more, the smaller canals are the best places to have a quick splash after a hot day under the sun!

Homestay Sg. Sireh
Kampong PT 1,
Sg. Sireh,
45500 Tanjung Karang,
Kuala Selangor, Selangor
Contact person: En. Abu Bakar bin Moin, Tel: 019 346 7372
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/homestaysgsireh/

2. Kampung Banghuris, Selangor

ASEAN Tourism Award-winning Banghuris Homestay is a name representing three villages namely Kampung Bukit Bangkong, Kampung Hulu Chuchoh and Kampung Hulu Teris.

This charming little village located not far from the Kuala Lumpur International Airport has a strong foundation in agriculture. Don’t be surprised to see coffee, rubber, and oil palm plantations alongside fresh-water fish farms and fruit orchards. The small cottage industry also thrives here churning out home-made cookies, tapioca chips and other local snacks. Indeed, the landscape of this village can only be described as abundant!

And so is the culture and heritage here. Visit the village during Hari Raya Aidil Fitri and you will witness the cheer and festivities of the village-folk. Often times, the celebrations are an excuse to “merewang,” an activity where everyone would gather at a common place to prepare and cook food together for the festival. Everyone has a designated duty, i.e. as the cook, as part of an army that peels potatoes or slices shallots, or as the clean-up crew.

It is during these festivities that one can truly experience the community spirit of the village folk as they embody all the modern corporate attributes of teamwork, leadership, time management, delegation and more!

Homestay Banghuris
Lot 1829, Jln. Tailong,
Kg. Ulu Chuchuh,
43950, Sg. Pelek,
Sepang, Selangor.
Contact person: Mr. Basir bin Wagiman, Tel: 013 300 3942
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/YokMampirBanghuris/

3. Kampung Pachitan, Negeri Sembilan

This village of about 1,000 population in Negeri Sembilan is said to have been pioneered by the Javanese from East Java, Indonesia, who came to settle here in the 1920s as paddy farmers. Later, palm and rubber plantations were opened when water sources for paddy ran dry. These plantations now become a tourist attraction as visitors learn more about crop-growing through hands-on experience.

The scenery in the area is dominated by large tracts of these crop plantations but the nearby beach holds many attractions as well. It’s a favourite spot to go fishing on the jetty or just sit by the beach to collect shellfish for a later meal. One can also opt to canoe along the mangrove area and do a spot of birdwatching.

What’s unique here is the Javanese culture and traditions that still remain strong and is manifested in the language spoken, the food, music and games. For example, visitors to Kampung Pachitan will certainly get a taste of Nasi Ambeng (a meal consisting of steamed white rice served with chicken in soy sauce and beef stewed for hours in thick gravy and other condiments), pecal (a local salad served with peanut sauce), and tempe goreng (fried fermented soy beans) and such.

It recently received an ASEAN Tourism Award in the Homestay category.

Homestay Kampung Pachitan
No.37, Taman Nuri Fasa 1,
Jalan Besar Chuah,
71960 Chuah, Port Dickson,
Negeri Sembilan.
Contact person: Mr. Ahmad Nadzri, Tel : 019 385 9793
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PachitanMalaysia/

4. Homestay Lonek, Negeri Sembilan

This village is simply picture perfect with timber dwellings sitting on wide and well-trimmed lawns and the scenery of paddy fields stretching out as far as the eye can see.

The folks who live here take great pride in their culture and heritage. They speak with a strong Negeri Sembilan accent, and will introduce you to typical Negeri Sembilan cuisine, the famous one being daging salai masak lemak cili api, which is smoked beef cooked in a gravy of coconut milk, turmeric and chilies. Traditional folk games are very much alive here and visitors will learn the Malaysian version of hoop rolling using bicycle wheel rims, bowling with coconuts and tobogganing on palm fronds.

If you don’t mind getting mud on your feet (and hands, face and hair), you can try out the local pastime of “mengocak ikan” or grasping for fish in the paddy fields.

Homestay Kampung Lonek
No. 10, Kampung Lonek,
72200 Batu Kikir,
Negeri Sembilan.
Contact person: Ms. Hajah Nor Asiah bt Haron, Tel : 06-498 1078 / 012 691 5482
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/homestaylonek/

5. Homestay Rawa, Negeri Sembilan

Fresh from winning the ASEAN Tourism Award 2019 in the Homestay category, Homestay Rawa has something unique to offer to visitors…horses! Horseriding is a great way to appreciate the beauty of this village. Saddle up and ride through bountiful fruit orchards, acres of rubber plantations and hillsides where you can appreciate a breathtaking view.

During fruiting season, there are plentiful fruits to keep you sated. From mangosteens and durians to rambutans and langsat. These tropical fruits grow abundantly in this village and are a joy to the palate.

For those who love cooking, the ladies of the village would be all too happy to share their secret recipes for their typical sweetcakes such as godok golumang which are fist-sized banana fritters coated in caramelized brown sugar and kuih bahulu (a light and fluffy sponge cake with a crispy outer layer, similar to the French madeleines) traditionally cooked over charcoal fire in brass moulds.

Homestay Rawa
Lot 23, Lorong KRU 10,
Kampung Rawa Hilir
71750 Lenggeng
Negeri Sembilan
Contact person: Ms. Saadiah Othman, Tel: 019 354 4472
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/asequine1/

Note: We are excited that on 18 January 2019, the following 5 Malaysian Homestay Villages had won the coveted ASEAN Tourism Award for ASEAN’s Best Sustainable Tourism Products Recognition for both rural and urban areas. The Malaysian winners in the Homestay category are as follows:

3rd ASEAN Homestay Standard (2019-2021)

1.Pachitan Homestay, Port Dickson, Negeri Sembilan
2.Ba’Kelalan HomestaySarawak
3.Misompuru Homestay, Kudat Sabah
4.Banghuris Homestay, Sepang Selangor
5.Rawa Homestay, Lenggeng, Negeri Sembilan

 

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Categories
Tourism Malaysia

A WALK IN TANJUNG TUAN

 

The historic Tanjung Tuan – also known by its Portuguese name Cape Rachado – is a gazetted forest reserve popular amongst birdwatchers near and far.

The only coastal-forest in Melaka, Tanjung Tuan’s history, environment and geographical location makes it a unique location for hiking and bird watching.

Gazetted as a permanent reserve forest by the Forest Department of Melaka in 1921 (under the title of Cape Rachado Permanent Reserved Forest), Tanjung Tuan is managed by Kumpulan Melaka Bhd., and is situated approximately 20km from Port Dickson.

The main entrance to Tanjung Tuan.

The old virgin coastal-forest contains a rich and diverse population of flora and fauna (177 species of plants and trees have been recorded), and is known to be the ideal ‘pit-stop’ for migratory birds – especially raptors – on the East Asian-Australia Flyway.

It’s also been designated as an Important Bird Area by international non-profit organisation BirdLife International, and a Wildlife Sanctuary by Malaysia’s Department of Wildlife and National Parks (PERHILITAN).

Every year, the Malaysian Nature Society (MNS) organises the Raptor Watch to coincide with the raptors’ journey back to the northern hemisphere via Tanjung Tuan, with the aim of spreading awareness on the conservation of raptors and their habitats.

Following the main road uphill leads to the Cape Rachado lighthouse.

Walking uphill on the main paved road leads to the iconic Cape Rachado lighthouse – rebuilt in 1863 – and a cliff-top view of the Malacca Straits. The Portuguese established the site after they conquered Melaka in 1511, and the lighthouse was initially built to guide their ships across the Straits.

The Battle of Cape Rachado occurred just off the coast in 1606, and is an important historic site for Melaka. The naval battle between the Dutch-Johor coalition and the Portuguese marked the beginning of a series of conflicts which eventually led to the Portuguese relinquishing control of Melaka in 1641. Several ships were lost during the battle; in 1995, the Dutch ship Nassau was excavated from the area and is on display at Lukut Museum in Port Dickson.

A view of the Cape Rachado lighthouse.

The lighthouse is not accessible to visitors, but a walk around the compound reveals the battle site and a stunning view of the Straits of Malacca.

“We came here because it was said to be ‘photo-worthy’,” says one visitor as she admires the ‘blue lagoon’ with her friends. They discovered Cape Rachado and Tanjung Tuan online after looking for picturesque places to visit in Port Dickson. Birdwatching enthusiasts also note the scenic spot to be excellent for spotting migratory birds.

Signs inside the park educate visitors on the migratory birds that fly through Tanjung Tuan.

Picturesque views of the Straits of Malacca, hidden behind the lighthouse.

The two forest trails near the lighthouse lead to different areas of Tanjung Tuan, while the trail behind the structure descends to a secluded beach where Hang Tuah’s footprint can be found. Following the circuit leads to an old Dutch well, and a wooden staircase brings visitors back uphill, towards the main paved road.

Following the pathway towards the beach will eventually lead to another historic site known as the Mystical Well. Hang Tuah’s footprint can be found by following the stairs by the well.

Following the pathway towards the beach will eventually lead to another historic site known as the Mystical Well. Hang Tuah’s footprint can be found by following the stairs by the well.

The remains of the Old Dutch Well at Tanjung Tuan.

Stairs descending to the beach from Cape Rachado.

A no-frills campsite is also located by the beach and is open to the public. For just RM3, visitors are welcome to camp there, plus camping equipment is available onsite.

The other forest path is located before the lighthouse’s staircase and goes to Bukit Batu Putih; climbing the limestone rocks offers a different view of the ocean.

The view of the Straits of Malacca from the secluded beach.

Camping is allowed for a small fee. The park’s campsite is located near the secluded beach at Tanjung Tuan.

Exploring Tanjung Tuan takes several hours and children and adults of all ages can be seen enjoying the recreational park. Although some paths may be tricky for the very young – and certain elevated pathways may be difficult for those below average fitness – people looking for a ‘forest cleanse’, a dose of history, and a view of the ocean will find them all here.

Hutan Rekreasi Tanjung Tuan,
Tanjung Tuan, 71050,
Melaka.

Open daily, 7am-6pm. Entry fee, RM1.

www.forestry.gov.my

Source From :http://www.malaysia.my/index.php
Text and photos by Stacy Liu

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Categories
Tourism Malaysia

THING TO DO IN THE MONTH OF MERDEKA

In Malaysia, Independence Day is celebrated on 31 August every year. Why is it important to celebrate our Independence Day?  For us, it is a day to remember all we as a nation have been through, as well as to demonstrate the significance of freedom and remind us of the sacrifices of our ancestors. By celebrating our Independence Day, we are acknowledging and owning the long and complicated history of our country. The whole month of August is actually dedicated to celebrating Malaysia’s independence.

For tourists to have a better understanding of Malaysia’s history, this is the right month to visit Malaysia.

So, let’s dedicate the whole month of August to learning about the history of Malaysia by doing these activities:


Visit the Army Museum, Port Dickson

Visiting this Army Museum can be a surreal encounter that all Malaysians should experience at least once in our lifetime. It will evoke a sense of patriotism and pride in all of us. Why this museum you asked, well, this Army Museum does a good job to show us key moments of Malaysian history and also the heroism of our warriors.

The Army Museum, known locally as Muzium Tentera Darat, is located next to a military base off the main road at 5th mile, about 7km away from Port Dickson town in Sirusa district. A property of the Malaysian Royal Armed Forces, the museum traces Malaysia’s exploits and achievements through history, trumped up with dramatised aspects and romantic story-telling.

Get to know Lieutenant Adnan Saidi who was a Malayan soldier of the 1st Infantry Brigade which fought the Japanese in Pasir Panjang and Bukit Chandu and regarded by Malaysians and Singaporeans as a national hero. Learn about the modern day heroes who saved the American soldiers during the Battle of Mogadishu, an incident that was later made into a movie called Black Hawk Down. All these stories are proudly displayed at the museum.

There are two blocks of buildings housing four galleries each, taking visitors from era to era. The museum use yellow footprints to guide you through the two-storey twin buildings so that chronological order is maintained. One of the galleries is dedicated to the era of the Melaka Sultanate, while another gallery tells the tale of British Malaya, and the various local heroes and freedom fighters. Other galleries are dedicated to the time of the formation of the Malay army, the time of the Japanese occupation and the communist insurgency.

Another interesting feature is a re-created mock-up of a communist underground tunnel. You walk down into the ground and into a darkened tunnel which has a communist sentry, surgery room, mock operations room and ammunition store.

In addition to the museum buildings, the spacious grounds also house decommissioned military vehicles, including planes, tanks and artillery guns, and a memorial fountain dedicated to soldiers who served through Malaysia’s war history. Children will love this museum because they can climb into some of the military vehicles and take pictures too.

Open daily from morning till evening, entry is free for all visitors.

Muzium Tentera Darat 
Batu 4, Kem Si Rusa
71050 Port Dickson, Negeri Sembilan
Tel: 06 – 647 1266 samb. 2482


Visit Tugu Negara (National Monument)

One place with patriotic significance that Malaysians rarely visit is the Tugu Negara or National Monument. Deeply rooted in Malaysia’s history, the National Monument (Tugu Negara) stands tall and proud as a testament of the sacrifices that we as a nation have gone through. Visiting this place can bring back mixed feelings, memories of struggles, moments of triumphs and at the same time sadness as we remember all those who died for the country.

Located in Jalan Tugu, off Jalan Parlimen, Tugu Negara was built for RM1.5mil and was officially unveiled on Feb 8, 1966. Malaysia’s first Prime Minister, the late Tunku Abdul Rahman, was inspired to build a monument after visiting the Marine Corps War Memorial in Virginia, United States in Oct 1960.

He believed it was essential to commemorate those who had perished defending the country, particularly during WWII and the Malayan Emergency from 1948 to 1960. It was reported that about 11,000 civilians and security forces were killed during that time.


The monument was designed by the late Tan Sri Felix de Weldon, an American sculptor of Austrian origin who had worked on the Marine Corps War Memorial. The construction of Tugu Negara began in 1963.

The bronze sculpture depicts a group of seven soldiers. In the middle stands a soldier in a victorious pose, his right hand holding a Malaysian flag (made from cloth). The height of the monument is 15m, making it the biggest freestanding bronze sculpture in the world.

The soldiers symbolise leadership, suffering, unity, vigilance, strength, courage and sacrifice. The statues are erected on stones imported from the coastal city of Karlshamn, Sweden.

The base of the monument is made from granite and bears the Malayan Coat of Arms, of which both sides are engraved with the inscription: “Dedicated to the heroic fighters in the cause of peace and freedom; May the blessing of Allah be upon them.”

At Tugu Negara, there are two monuments to take note of as you enter the compound. The first is a 10m-high cenotaph (an empty tomb or monument erected to honour the dead) which stands at the upper entrance of the National Monument, on a seven- tiered rectangular base.

The inscription at the bottom, “To Our Glorious Dead (1914–1918), (1939–1945) and the Emergency (1948–1960)”, testifies to Malaysia’s involvement in a number of wars, including both World Wars and and also the Malayan Emergency, a guerilla war between the Commonwealth armed forces and the military arm of the Malayan Communist Party.

Interestingly, the cenotaph was originally placed at Jalan Sultan Hishamuddin (formerly called Victoria Avenue) near the old Kuala Lumpur Railway Station. It was later moved to its current site to make way for the construction of a flyover connecting Jalan Sultan Hishamuddin and the Parliament roundabout.

Names of the fallen are engraved on the plaques of the cenotaph as a token of tribute to their sacrifices.

Getting to the National Monument is relatively easy. Hop on the KTM train and get off at the Bank Negara Station. Follow the signage to Jalan Parlimen or Botanical Lake Garden. It will take about 15 minutes by foot or five minutes by taxi.

Another option is to take the Kuala Lumpur Hop-on, Hop-off bus from Jalan Bukit Bintang. One of the stops is the National Monument. You can explore the area for a bit and then take the next bus to continue the city tour of Kuala Lumpur.

The cheapest way is to take the metro to the Old Railway Station. From there it is a 10/15 minute walk to the entrance of the wonderful Lake Gardens, one of the biggest parks in Kuala Lumpur. It will take another 15/25 minutes to walk through the park to the north entrance where it is only a 5/10 minute walk to the National Monument.

Daily opening hours are between 7am and 6pm.

Location: Jalan Tamingsabi
Address: Jalan Parlimen, Kuala Lumpur 50480 Malaysia
Tel: +603-2615-8188

Story is credited to The Star.

Fly the Jalur Gemilang campaign

In order to nurture the spirit of patriotism in all of us, let’s participate in the Fly the Jalur Gemilang, our national flag campaign. This year, the Penang Esplanade or Padang Kota Lama has been selected as the venue for the launch of the 2018 National Month and Fly the Jalur Gemilang campaign scheduled for 4 Aug 2018.

In keeping with this year’s theme for National Day, which is Sayangi Malaysiaku (Love Our Malaysia), we can safely say that flying the Malaysian flag proudly can be a symbol of our love for the country. Jalur Gemilang should be given the utmost respect and dignity as it symbolises national sovereignty, unity and national pride.

So let’s fly our flag on our vehicles, office cubicles, houses, restaurants, hotels, etc throughout the whole month of August. Some tourists collected flag of the country they visited so this a good opportunity to get a free Jalur Gemilang to add to your flag collection.


Watching the Independence Day Parade

This coming 31 August 2018 marks the 61st anniversary of Malaysia’s national independence. Known locally as Hari Kemerdekaan, it is the time of the year when Malaysians show their appreciation for yet another year of harmony among the people, and are reminded of their country’s struggle for independence.

This national event helps to educate the public, especially the younger generation, about the importance of racial tolerance, unity and cooperation so that the country can continue to enjoy prosperity, development and harmony.

The annual celebrations will not be complete without the pomp and splendour of the traditional procession. On Independence Day itself, the national day parade will take place at Wilayah Persekutuan Putrajaya at 7 am in the presence of Their Majesties, the King and Queen of Malaysia. The VIPs gracing the occasion are the Hon. Prime Minister of Malaysia, Malaysian cabinet ministers, foreign ambassadors and other dignitaries. Although Putrajaya is the celebration’s epicenter, expect smaller Hari Kemerdekaan celebrations all over the country to include parades and fireworks.

Among those who participate in this parade are government services such as the military, the police force, naval forces, public and private sectors’ staff and school children.

The day will be filled with a procession, cultural performances, military demonstration, intricate floats, and other interesting diversions. So, don your patriotic gear and grab a flag and start waving it!

The closing of Independence Month 2018 will be held in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah on 16 September, as it is the date that the federation of Malaysia was formed in 1963. Everyone can expect another lineup of fun patriotic activities that will pump up his/her patriotism.

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

Categories
Tourism Malaysia

RFC-Rainforest Challenge

RFC-Rainforest Challenge

Date : 27 Nov 2015 – 07 Dec 2015

 

The RFC is an off-road 4×4 eventuality that is among a world’s tip 10 toughest engine races. It takes place annually from finish Nov to early Dec. Every year, it attracts a bravest of a land daredevils from Europe to Asian to face a contingency in a jungle for 10 days braving a mud, rain, high uphill, downhill undulating turf and a rage of Mother Nature from a monsoon. An unusual eventuality for unusual adventurers set in an unusual season, a monsoon. Event also open for Media Touring Adventurers.

Venue

Seremban , Port Dickson, Gemas, Kuala Pilah Jelebu (Negeri Sembilan)

Organiser

RFC (Rainforest Challenge) International

No 6-2, 2nd Floor, Jalan 1/76 C

Desa Pandan

55100 Kuala lumpur

Malaysia

Phone

03-9200 8908 , 012-211 7080

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