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Malaysia Travel Guide

Little Known Secrets of the Beads of Borneo

From the Zulu warriors in South Africa, to the ancient Egyptians of North Africa, to the pilgrims of the Middle East or South America, beads have a presence in many cultures but the one commonality is that they have always been more than an eye-catching accessory. The story of the beads of Borneo is no exception.

For many cultures, they were a currency, or perhaps a sign of faith, a symbol of wealth or a family heirloom to be treasured for future generations. Whatever the purpose, the one consistency is that they are always a way of expression.

Sarawak in Malaysian Borneo has a unique relationship with the beads of Borneo. Although there isn’t any definitive evidence of when exactly the beads came to the region, there is evidence to suggest beads were first used in Borneo by visiting sailors for bartering. Back then, beads were made out of shells, teeth, bones and stones that were perforated and worn as ornaments.

Some Sarawak tribes believe that the longer a bead lasts, the more powerful it becomes and the bearer can draw strength from the bead. However, to do so, the bearer must have a strong soul.

Source: Sarawak Tourism Board

There are over 30 tribes in Sarawak and each tribe has its own way of adorning themselves with beads. Some of them use them as necklaces, others as beaded head caps or beaded skirts, others as bracelets or even rings. Beads would also be used as decorations during festivals or other big gatherings.

The baby carriers used by Orang Ulu women to carry their infants are adorned with beadwork and finishes made out of wild boar or leopard teeth. Apart from indicating status, the tingling of the Hawk’s bells and large beads attached to the upper rim of the carrier would soothe the toddler on long journeys through the rain forest.

Many of the antique beads of Borneo are hard to find now. There are a number of reasons for this. Historically, the beads were sometimes buried with their owners as part of their grave clothes, or as “grave gifts”, for the deceased to use in their long journey to the underworld.

As mentioned, beads were also used as currency, often traded with visiting sailors or lost in the sometimes devastating longhouse fires that could rip through 100 doors in less than an hour.

As beads were increasingly hard to come by and time became a precious commodity, modern day beads are mostly imported from Indonesia and China, according to Heidi Munan, Sarawak Museum’s curator of beads. However they are still influenced by the original beads of Borneo.

So while these new beads are still traded, they are no longer the currency of trade. And despite being mass produced, they are increasingly expensive yet have little of the character of the original beads. At the same time, the number of communities still making the beads of Borneo in the traditional manner is slowly diminishing.

Preserving the traditionality of beadmaking

However, the Lun Bawang community in Long Tuma village, Lawas, northern Sarawak continues to make ceramic beads the way they’ve always been made. Partly to generate income for the community but also because they want to keep the tradition alive and let everyone have the opportunity to wear the beads during traditional festivities.

The process begins with a group of five women wading almost nonchalantly into the crocodile infested waters of Pa’ Lawas river to find and dig up the smooth fine clay, which they call “tanah salit”.

The clay is taken to the village by hand, pounded and kneaded to the right consistency and shaped into tiny beads, roughly the size of a pea. The beads are then sun-dried, and strung up on wire loops and fired in a backyard bonfire.

Patricia Busak, daughter of Litad Muluk, who manages the ceramic beads centre, was interviewed by the Star newspaper some time ago and talked through the process, “It takes at least three pairs of hands to make just one bead: one to gather and process the river clay before shaping it into beads; another to paint the underglaze pattern; and a third to paint the glaze and arrange the beads in an electric kiln at the community-owned workshop in the village.”

She went on to say, “It’s very specialised; for instance, only three women in our group are skilled at rolling the beads. I can’t roll, but I’m good at painting the pattern.”

The Long Tuma women are the only beadmakers in Sarawak. Even though their business is thriving, the most important thing for the Lun Bawang community, is the opportunity to preserve their heritage.

“The kind of beads we have, how we string and wear them, give us our sense of identity as a Lun Bawang,” concludes Patricia in the interview.

Beads of Borneo - Painting a bead

Source: Borneo Talk, “The Glistening Beads Of Kampung Long Tuma”

Because beads have been used for so long and came from various parts of the world, the types of beads found in Sarawak vary. Here are a few examples of the types of beads you should look out for during your time in Sarawak and especially if you go to a festival.

Lukut Sekala

The Lukut Sekala beads are worn almost exclusively by members of the Kayan tribe. These beads serve as a symbol of longevity to the community. This is because the beads last for so long that they have become heirlooms, passed down through multiple generations.

Source: @taytayxanadu on Carousell

There are also the Lukut Bela Laba, which are considered male or female depending on whether the shape of the bead was long or flat. The beads are considered extremely valuable. These beads are often of great value to the Kayan.

According to legend, a trader who wanted to travel by river to the interior of Sarawak bought a second-hand outboard engine with just one Lukut Sekala bead.

Beads of Borneo - bead designs

Source: Rustic Borneo Travel, “Borneo Beads – Beautiful Status Symbols”

Ba’o Rawir

The Ba’o Rawir, or the drinking straw beads are created by Kelabit ladies. The Kelabit tribe originates from the Bario Highlands located in the northernmost part of Sarawak. The Kelabit people have a close association with the Lun Bawang tribe as they are geographically close to one another.

The Ba’o Rawir beads are used to create intricate designs on the Peta, a hat worn by Kelabit ladies. It is a status symbol which had the equivalent value of one buffalo in the old days when owning a buffalo was considered a sign of wealth. Today, an antique Peta hat made out of Ba’o Rawir can fetch up to RM 30,000 (US$ 7,150).

Beads of Borneo - Kelabit woman head gear

Source: Kelabit Wiki, “Peta”

Experience bead making yourself

Located in the north of Sarawak, the Long Tuma village is close to the Brunei border. The Ceramic Bead Centre holds workshops where you can learn how to make the beads and create your own piece. The Beads centre is currently managed by Litad Muluk and her daughter Patricia who is quoted above.

These women work the fields during the day and use the bead centre as an extra income stream while keeping the tradition alive. You can even see how this group of dedicated women put together beautiful pieces of jewellery.

And if you like what you see, you can support their efforts by purchasing beads from the souvenir shop.

Here is where it’s located:
Pusat Kraftangan Manik Seramik
Kampung Long Tuma, 98850 Lawas, Sarawak
Tel: +6013 565 6951

If you’re interested to learn more about the beading culture of Borneo, Heidi Munan’s book on Bornean beads is a highly recommended read. In it, she explains the historic significance of beads and how they transcend its mere aesthetic appeal.

You can also order beads online and support the Lawas bead community at the same time. These 3 online stores offer authentic products sourced from Sarawak:

  1. Gerai OA
  2. Gaya Borneo
  3. Bonita and the Beads
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Article source: http://sarawaktourism.com/blog/feed/

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Tourism Malaysia

THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT PEKAN RABU

One of the most popular attractions in Alor Setar, the capital of Kedah, is its Pekan Rabu, which literally means Wednesday Market, a business complex selling every traditional stuff that Kedah is famous for. What makes Pekan Rabu more special to the Kedahans is because Malaysia’s fourth and currently seventh Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamad, born in Alor Setar, was once a trader there.

Yes, you heard it right! During the Japanese Occupation, Tun Dr. Mahathir’s studies were interrupted so he decided to return to his birthplace and become a trader at the old Pekan Rabu, selling fruits, banana fritters, coffee and handicrafts until the World War II ended.

When Tun Dr. Mahathir became a politician, he made it his personal mission to turn the traditional market into a commercial one. He made sure that the weekly market operating from an attap shack, became a multi-storey arcade selling a wide range of stuff from traditional delicacies like “dodol durian” to mengkuang mats and apparel.

The brick-and-mortar shopping complex was built on Jalan Tunku Ibrahim in 1975 and was officially opened in 1978 by Tun Dr. Mahathir himself, the then-Deputy Prime Minister. It had 347 stalls with a variety of businesses and became one of the important landmarks of Alor Setar. The Phase 2 of the shopping complex was built in 1990 and later, in 1995, the original building was renovated.

Pekan Rabu has always been a compulsory stop in Tun Dr. Mahathir’s annual Ramadan pilgrimage to Alor Setar. On his recent visit to Pekan Rabu after he became the Prime Minister for the second time, Tun Dr. Mahathir visited the stall selling the ‘Songkok Style Tun’ which has become his favourite and one he frequents regularly.

The history of Pekan Rabu actually goes as far back as World War I. A prince from the royal household of Kedah, the late Tunku Yaacob Almarhum Sultan Abdul Hamid, wanted to encourage more Malays to take an active role in commercial activities. So, in the early 1920s, he initiated a weekly market, open only on Wednesdays, along Sungai Kedah near Tanjung Chali. It became a training ground for the Malays to do business and it later evolved into a daily market when the business became prosperous. In 1932, Pekan Rabu was shifted to its present location in Jalan Tunku Ibrahim.

In 2014, Pekan Rabu was given a total makeover in an effort to make it more attractive to tourists. Even though the upgrading of the complex involved building a four-storey complex with a modern architecture, the original concept of Pekan Rabu, which made it unique, was maintained, including its traditional Islamic architecture.
The former Pekan Rabu used to have two separate buildings but the new building has everything under one roof to make shopping more comfortable for its visitors. It currently has 355 business lots, as well as 48 kiosks and 24 food stalls. There is also an exhibition area on the ground floor. It is open daily from 9 am to 9 pm.

Pekan Rabu offers a wide range of goods and services, including crockery, jewellery, textiles, traditional medicines, wedding and bridal items, local delicacies and handicrafts. For the locals, it is a complete shopping mall that fulfils all needs, while for tourists, it is glimpse into the daily lives of both traders and the local customers.

Let us throw a challenge to the would-be visitor to Pekan Rabu. Whenever you have an opportunity to visit the place, take the time to trace our Prime Minister’s favourite haunts or shops at Pekan Rabu. If you are lucky, the original traders there might share a story or two about the world’s oldest country leader, our Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Mahathir. Good luck!

Getting There

By Car or Taxi
From the North-South Expressway (PLUS), take either the Alor Setar Selatan or Alor Setar Utara exit and follow the signboard heading to Alor Setar City Centre. From there you can see the signboard showing how to get to ‘Pekan Rabu’.

By Train (ETS)
From Kuala Lumpur Sentral Station to Alor Setar, Kedah will take approximately 5 1/2hours journey by KTM ETS

Who To Contact
Koperasi Pekan Rabu Alor Setar Berhad
Tel: +604-733 5929

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

Categories
Tourism Malaysia

PEKAN RABU

One of the most popular attractions in Alor Setar, the capital of Kedah, is its Pekan Rabu, which literally means Wednesday Market, a business complex selling every traditional stuff that Kedah is famous for. What makes Pekan Rabu more special to the Kedahans is because Malaysia’s fourth and currently seventh Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamad, born in Alor Setar, was once a trader there.

Yes, you heard it right! During the Japanese Occupation, Tun Dr. Mahathir’s studies were interrupted so he decided to return to his birthplace and become a trader at the old Pekan Rabu, selling fruits, banana fritters, coffee and handicrafts until the World War II ended.

When Tun Dr. Mahathir became a politician, he made it his personal mission to turn the traditional market into a commercial one. He made sure that the weekly market operating from an attap shack, became a multi-storey arcade selling a wide range of stuff from traditional delicacies like “dodol durian” to mengkuang mats and apparel.

The brick-and-mortar shopping complex was built on Jalan Tunku Ibrahim in 1975 and was officially opened in 1978 by Tun Dr. Mahathir himself, the then-Deputy Prime Minister. It had 347 stalls with a variety of businesses and became one of the important landmarks of Alor Setar. The Phase 2 of the shopping complex was built in 1990 and later, in 1995, the original building was renovated.

Pekan Rabu has always been a compulsory stop in Tun Dr. Mahathir’s annual Ramadan pilgrimage to Alor Setar. On his recent visit to Pekan Rabu after he became the Prime Minister for the second time, Tun Dr. Mahathir visited the stall selling the ‘Songkok Style Tun’ which has become his favourite and one he frequents regularly.

The history of Pekan Rabu actually goes as far back as World War I. A prince from the royal household of Kedah, the late Tunku Yaacob Almarhum Sultan Abdul Hamid, wanted to encourage more Malays to take an active role in commercial activities. So, in the early 1920s, he initiated a weekly market, open only on Wednesdays, along Sungai Kedah near Tanjung Chali. It became a training ground for the Malays to do business and it later evolved into a daily market when the business became prosperous. In 1932, Pekan Rabu was shifted to its present location in Jalan Tunku Ibrahim.

In 2014, Pekan Rabu was given a total makeover in an effort to make it more attractive to tourists. Even though the upgrading of the complex involved building a four-storey complex with a modern architecture, the original concept of Pekan Rabu, which made it unique, was maintained, including its traditional Islamic architecture.
The former Pekan Rabu used to have two separate buildings but the new building has everything under one roof to make shopping more comfortable for its visitors. It currently has 355 business lots, as well as 48 kiosks and 24 food stalls. There is also an exhibition area on the ground floor. It is open daily from 9 am to 9 pm.

Pekan Rabu offers a wide range of goods and services, including crockery, jewellery, textiles, traditional medicines, wedding and bridal items, local delicacies and handicrafts. For the locals, it is a complete shopping mall that fulfils all needs, while for tourists, it is glimpse into the daily lives of both traders and the local customers.

Let us throw a challenge to the would-be visitor to Pekan Rabu. Whenever you have an opportunity to visit the place, take the time to trace our Prime Minister’s favourite haunts or shops at Pekan Rabu. If you are lucky, the original traders there might share a story or two about the world’s oldest country leader, our Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Mahathir. Good luck!

Getting There

By Car or Taxi
From the North-South Expressway (PLUS), take either the Alor Setar Selatan or Alor Setar Utara exit and follow the signboard heading to Alor Setar City Centre. From there you can see the signboard showing how to get to ‘Pekan Rabu’.

By Train (ETS)
From Kuala Lumpur Sentral Station to Alor Setar, Kedah will take approximately 5 1/2hours journey by KTM ETS

Who To Contact
Koperasi Pekan Rabu Alor Setar Berhad
Tel: +604-733 5929

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

Categories
Tourism Malaysia

The Sky Bar of Trader Hotel during Puteri Harbour

The Sky Bar (N1.41768 E103.65640) is located during a Rooftop pool rug of Trader Hotel during Puteri Harbour, Nusajaya – Johor. We were invited to a Sky Bar for their opening private celebration on Saturday dusk 12th Oct 2013. Sky Bar is a heading of Trader Hotel, have we been to a Sky Bar during Trader Hotel Kuala Lumpur?



The Sky Bar is totally opposite from day time and night time…it’s a pleasing forever swimming pool unaware a Puteri Harbour and Danga stream during a day time, when a nights fall…the pool area is light adult with a pleasing lighting and association by a Sky Bar beside…

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It was about 7pm, a invited guest were walking into a Sky Bar area one-by-one…foods and drinks were prepared most progressing to offer all a guests…

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The tiny list in a pool was a uninformed seafood like oysters and others…this was a special arrangement, Nice!

About 120 guest from members of Singapore Sport Car Club, Exotic Car Club, Super Bikers from Johor Bahru and corporate guest attended a opening party.

The guest reserve adult for dishes really shortly only after 7pm, theory everybody can’t wait to ambience a tasty cuisine prepared by a Executive Chef – Alan Wong and Food and Beverage Manager – Avraam Koutsides, Trader Hotel.

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Every guest was queuing adult for their favorite food that located during limit of a Sky Bar. There were copiousness of varieties on that dusk with a far-reaching food operation from internal to international, from tender to cooked…

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There was a prolonged reserve for a above foods…especially a ‘beef’! Yummy!

The seafood opposite was specifically presented in a children pool…yes, we listened me right! It was inside a pool.

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The dessert and finger food dilemma was located only subsequent to a children pool. we can’t stop myself to took a tiny brick of dim chocolate, and it was Nice!

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The dining area was reserved in each corner, filled adult a Sky Bar…

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I like this special fallen dilemma (below) really much! It’s located subsequent to a forever pool, surrounded with gradual potion and a Blue aflame relax chair! Overlooking a Puteri Harbour and Danga river…Awesome!

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Once everybody filled adult their stomach, a celebration began! The drink was offer but interlude postponement from Carlsberg’s 4 flattering promoters. Followed by a song played by a DJ Herbs and Deeraj.

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We had a potion of a ice cold drink beside a pool and started a print sharpened session…
During a song played, there was a unit of synchronized swimmers behaving in a pool followed by 4 flattering charming mermaids! That was a Surprised! Everyone was bustling triggering their shiver of a cameras crazily! Haha! It was a really good stage with a mermaids float opposite and a underwater lighting…

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The 2 charming lions were behaving their dance in a bar and presented a oranges to a Executive Chef – Mr Alan Wong and F B Manager – Mr Avraam Koustsides.

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And a print event continued…



You can have a glorious perspective of Puteri Harbour and locate a fantastic nightfall (if a continue is good) from a Sky Bar of Trader Hotel.

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This is also a good place for night photography lover, we can suffer a pleasant cooking association with good booze or cocktail while holding a shots of a pleasing surrounding night view…

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All Malaysia Info

Rare discernment into Syed Mokhtar

Listed as a seventh richest Malaysian with a net value of US$3.3 billion, not many is famous from a media-shy Syed Mokhtar.

Syed Mokhtar Albukhary

Syed Mokhtar Albukhary : A Biography

Syed Mokhtar Albukhary, A Biography
Author: Premilla Mohanlall
Publisher: PVM Communications

MY initial assembly with aristocrat Tan Sri Syed Mokhtar Albukhary went off in a rather surprising way. The year was 2004 and he had wanted to accommodate someone from The Star to make famous his views over his quarrel with another tycoon, a late Tan Sri Nasimuddin SM Amin, over DRB-Hicom.

Syed Mokhtar felt a media lucky a Naza Group trainer over him and he wanted to give his side of a story.

Both were battling over a vital 15.8% retard of shares in DRB-Hicom hold by 3 parties, including a estate of a late Tan Sri Yahaya Ahmad, and a adversary was billed as a “Fight of The Big Boys.”

The array of journal headlines had forced a reserved Syed Mokhtar to come out and pronounce to this author to put a record straight.

Our assembly during a business centre of a five-star hotel during Jalan Sultan Ismail was bound during 9pm though he usually incited adult nearby midnight. Although he was dressed in a white long-sleeved shirt, we beheld that he usually wore sandals. He was over dual hours late.

His aides had warned me that he would substantially be “waylaid” on a approach there by businessmen and politicians, many of whom would ask for business deals or favours.

To equivocate such disruptions, he shuttles between his residence during abundant Bukit Tunku – that he bought given he became a millionaire bachelor – and a hotel to accommodate his associates and contacts. The other assembly indicate is a Islamic Arts Museum nearby a National Mosque.

The other rather surprising assembly mark is an Indian grill during Jalan Pahang. To this day, he carries with him a tumbler of tea, finished by a sold waiter, from a eatery.

“If (the late Tan Sri) Loh Boon Siew can accommodate his friends during a coffeeshop any morning, we see no reason given we can't suffer my teh tarik during a shop, saya joke tong san mali, like him,” he told me, referring to Boon Siew’s ancestral roots from China. Syed Mokktar’s ancestral roots, on a other hand, can be traced to Central Asia.

By a time we finished a conversations, it was tighten to 2am. As we put down my coop and was about to tighten my note book, he unexpected told me that a discussions were wholly off a record and he was not to be quoted.

The publicity-shy businessman has never been during palliate with reporters though we wasn’t going to concede Syed Mokhtar to have his way. we told him, in no capricious terms, that if that were so, we would have squandered my whole dusk with him, and either he favourite it or not, we was going to put him on record.

I contingency have finished an sense on him given as we got to know any other better, he was prepared to share his private thoughts with me frequently – though still never on record.

But a media is still satirical on Syed Mokhtar and, in some ways, he is to be blamed as he has never finished himself accessible to journalists, preferring to let his aides do a talking. In fact, bankers also protest that he never meets them!

Interestingly enough, a whole section is clinging to his exchange with a media in his autobiography that has only strike a bookstores created by Premilla Mohanlall, a author and a open family practitioner.

“I consternation given we get bad press when others who have abused a complement for personal gains have not been subjected to such media scrutiny. Perhaps it is time to come out and urge myself,” he pronounced in a book.

The 180-page book is really readable, starting with his childhood days in a encampment attap residence with no piped H2O and electricity, where a toilet was a array latrine. It traces Syed Mokhtar’s initial knowledge of doing business underneath his cattle merchant father in Alor Star. His father migrated to Kedah from a Afghan segment of Central Asia around India and Thailand.

The book gives a singular look into his family life and how a family’s financial constraints forced Syed Mokhtar to stop drill after Form Five, while his siblings were means to continue. There was also his early growing-up years with a infantryman uncle in Johor Baru.

He takes honour job himself a businessman with no diplomas, and his ability to pronounce a layman’s denunciation is apparent in a book. Much space is dedicated to his early days as a travelling salesman, when he had to nap in a lorries and on bug-infested beds in inexpensive hotels.

The indicate that Syed Mokhtar seems to wish to tell his readers is that he did not get his resources on a china platter. While a certain movement of a New Economic Policy had helped him, he worked tough and fought hard. He was not a form who cashed out after removing a pinkish forms.

In short, he went by a good and bad times, like many well-tested businessmen. The 1997 financial predicament saw his resources shrank from RM3bil to RM600mil.

“Eighty per cent of my marketplace capitalisation was wiped out. There was a lot of pain and hardship. Many people suspicion we would container adult and leave. we am a fighter, with a clever will to survive.

“I mislaid large nights of sleep, we mislaid hair, though we did not remove steer of one thing: my shortcoming to guarantee vital bumiputra resources and to strengthen a interests of my staff.”

Today, he has 110,000 staff underneath his payroll and indirectly about 250,000 other Malaysians, quite vendors, given he acquired Proton this year.

Syed Mokhtar’s tighten ties with Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad is good documented though in this book, Syed Mokhtar spoke vividly, if not humorously, of their initial encounter.

It was Thursday, Jan 16, 1997 and a time was 2.30pm – Syed Mokhtar entered a bureau of a former Prime Minister.

“I greeted him with a salam and he stood before me, with his hands folded opposite a chest. He did not call for me to take a chair when he sat down. we was sweating, and motionless to lay down to benefaction a papers we had prepared to explain all my businesses in Kedah, Kuala Lumpur and Johor.

“It enclosed building skeleton for a new plan in Alor Star, a sprawling growth with a mosque and a health and gratification comforts for a bad as good as an general university for disadvantaged communities around a world.

“The Prime Minister listened carefully, though observant a word. By a time we was done, it was an hour and 10 minutes. Still, not a word. we left a papers on his table and took leave.”

Not prolonged later, Syed Mokthar, who was still asleep, perceived a call from Dr Mahathir himself with a elementary message: “Your matter in Kedah is settled.” That is of march selected Dr Mahathir, a male who has no time for tiny pronounce and offering few words.

Apart from his countless business ventures, Syed Mokhtar also writes in fact of his countless free works.

Almost any year, his Albukhary Foundation hosts dual iftar or fast-breaking dinners for over 3,000 needy people. The substructure now has a few flagship projects, including a Islamic Arts Museum built in 1998.

In 2001, a substructure launched a Albukhry Tuition Programme to assistance a underachieving farming propagandize children pass their final high propagandize examination. At a finish of a programme, 9 years later, about 80,000 students from 500 schools had benefited from these calming classes.

His substructure has also extended assistance to survivors of earthquakes in China, Pakistan and Iran, and a tsunami in Indonesia. It has also built an AIDS sanatorium in Uganda and a girls’ propagandize in Nepal as good as helped support a Sarajevo Science and Technology centre.

An engaging section is on his purpose as a family man. Syed Mokhtar has never overwhelmed on his private life in any interview, that has been rare, in any case.

The father of 7 children, between a ages of dual and 18, suggested how his standard meetings start during 10pm and finish during 3am “and is hold 7 days a week and has been a slight for some-more than 20 years.”

“Fortunately, my mother comes from a business family and understands this. Initially, we had to explain a arrangement to her, and she supposed it. Except for family holidays, in a 20 years of marriage, we don’t consider we have spent many evenings during home after 10pm,” he wrote.

Syed Mokhtar married in 1992 during a age of 41 to afterwards 24-year-old Sharifah Zarah. There are also singular cinema of his family in a book.

Although a book is, no doubt, a open family exercise, a right questions have been acted by a writer, including a public’s notice of his many acquisitions and a common critique that he has some-more than he can chew.

He also answered a emanate of a shareholding structure of his companies that could not be traced to him, acknowledging “it is an aged robe that has to change.”

Syed Mokhtar hasn’t altered much. He is frequency seen in open functions. He is still some-more during palliate in short-sleeved shirts and sandals. The billionaire now travels on a private jet though in town, he still drives around in his aged Proton Perdana. By WONG CHUN WAI

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