Categories
Malaysia Travel Guide

Why Kuching should be on the radar of every digital nomad

As a digital nomad in Southeast Asia, there’s a good chance you’re used to doing things the unconventional way. If that’s the case, you ought to read on and learn about the place dubbed the next Chiang Mai.

We’re talking about Kuching, Sarawak. 

Source: appc2019.ifm.org.my

Located in the Malaysian part of Borneo, Kuching is the capital city of Sarawak, a founding partner in the nation of Malaysia. Modern yet laid back, Kuching has outstanding infrastructure yet remains very much in touch with nature. 

Modern Kuching can be traced back to 1841, when James Brooke, the son of an English judge in the East India Company who happened to be sailing the Malay Archipelago, helped the King of Brunei crush a rebellion in southern Borneo.

Source: Culture Trip

As a reward, Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddin II of Brunei gave him Sarawak, a swampy and mostly jungle-covered land inhabited by notorious and very dangerous headhunting indigenous tribes.

And that’s how James Brooke became the first White Rajah and the Kingdom of Sarawak was born. With the exception of the second world war period from 1941 – 1945 when it was occupied by the Japanese, Sarawak was a standalone kingdom under the White Rajahs until 1946.

At the end of the occupation of Sarawak, on 11 September 1945, the British military took over Sarawak for 7 months before handing it back to Rajah Charles Vyner Brooke. 

Seeing the damage done by the Japanese, Rajah Brooke realised he no longer had the resources to develop Sarawak. He hoped that with the cession of Sarawak as a British crown colony, the British would be able to rebuild Sarawak’s infrastructure and develop its postwar economy.

So Sarawak became a British colony from 1946-1963 before becoming equal partners along with Peninsular Malaya, Sabah and Singapore to form Malaysia. (Singapore later withdrew itself and became an independent nation in 1965).

Source: blogspot.com

The White Rajahs played an important role in uniting the multiple races in Sarawak. With multiple ethnicities such as Malay, Iban, Bidayuh, Chinese and Indians residing harmoniously, Kuching has become a true melting pot of cultures and is seen by many as a role model for cultural and religious harmony. 

Kuching is called ‘The City of Cats’. You will find cat murals and statues everywhere in the town centre. The city’s obsession really stems from its name. The word ‘Kucing’ means cat in the Malay language. 

How Kuching got its name is a mystery. Some say that when the first Rajah of Sarawak, James Brooke, arrived around 1839, he pointed to the settlement and asked a local what it was called. The local, mistakenly thought he was pointing at a passing cat and said ‘Kucing’ (pronounced Coo-ching). 

A descendant of the passing cat that James Brooke mistakenly pointed at. Or so we like to think. 😉 Source: Aish Mann

Others claim the city was named after trees that once grew throughout the area, bearing small fruit called mata kucing, or ‘cat’s eye fruit’, which is similar to lychee. The last theory is that the name was chosen when residents discovered short-tailed cats living along the banks of the mighty Sarawak River which flows through the city.   

As you walk around the streets of Kuching, you’ll feel the soul of the city in its historic buildings, vibrant street art, and warm, friendly people. 

‘The Early Mercers’ at India Street. Source: Aish Mann

With lush rainforests and the South China Sea in close proximity, a chilled authentic vibe with all the luxuries of a modern city, Kuching is the perfect haven for digital nomads who want an idyllic environment in which to work.

So, why should digital nomads base themselves in Kuching?

We asked a few who have made the move to Kuching and here’s what one said: 

After visiting a lot of tourist places, I found a peaceful and quiet place in Kuching to focus on my work. iCube is very comfortable and convenient. I can find everything I need in the nearby mall Icom Square with lots of food places and a gym. People here are very calm, kind and respectful. Everyone speaks English, so it’s easy to connect with locals. It’s not the case everywhere in Asia and this is a very appreciable point for me.” –Virginie Sarachman, France.

The sky puts on a spectacular show almost every day at Waterfront, Kuching. 

We also spoke to Melvin Liew the ‘go to’ guy for digital nomads in Kuching. Here’s what he had to say about the gradually growing digital nomad community in Kuching. 

We saw the trend (of digital nomad arrivals) increasing when the tourism sector in Sarawak started to grow. It is essential to have a solid community and the constant improvement of infrastructure for Digital Nomads in Sarawak.” – Melvin Liew, Director, iCube Innovation

Another reason for digital nomads to live in Kuching 

If you’re from Europe or North America, you get a 90-day visa on arrival, compared to a 30-day visa for Indonesia and a 2-week visa for Thailand.

Source: tour-borneo-malaysia.com

That means you have plenty of time to get settled in and every time you leave the country, you get a 3-month visa on your return.

Now, it may seem like Kuching is in some faraway, inaccessible land, but the truth is, you could be sipping a cold beer in the hustle and bustle of Orchard Road, Singapore in a mere 3 hours. 

Singapore too sterile for you? Then you can be in downtown Kuala Lumpur in 3 hours too. The beautiful beaches of Kota Kinabalu are just 2 hours away.

Fancy something laidback? Then the city of Bandar Seri Begawan would be up your alley with direct flights from Kuching that will get you there in less than 2 hours. And the cherry on the cake is that flights to all these destinations start from just US$20! 

Now, where should you stay in Kuching?

Kuching has accommodation for all budgets. Airbnb works pretty well here and you have an array of apartments/condominiums to choose from. 

James from locationindependent.co.uk suggests placing yourself as close to the Waterfront area as possible. He says there really isn’t an expat neighborhood but Waterfront is the most central part of Kuching and almost all the main spots are walkable from there. 

Another main area is Padungan Street. It’s a bit further away from the town centre but it is a lively street with some of the best food options. 

If you prefer a short-term rental, we suggest you come and stay in a hotel to personally view places before renting, just to be on the safe side. 

How do you move around town?

Kuching is the most pedestrian-friendly city in Malaysia, especially if you live around the town centre.

Carpenter Street. 

Car or motorbike rentals are available but we recommend Grab (equivalent of Uber) and Maxim. Both apps work flawlessly around Kuching and each ride costs between US$2 – 4 if you’re in the town area.

Where to stuff your face 

Now that you’re mobile, it’s time to get some delicious food into that hungry tummy!

Lucky for you, Kuching is full of gastronomical marvels. 

With numerous influences from indigenous tribes as well as Chinese, Malay and Indian cultures, you’ll never run out of new things to appease your hunger. 

One of the most famous dishes you absolutely have to try is Sarawak Laksa. This typical Sarawakian breakfast dish is made of a special prawn-based broth thickened with coconut milk.

A perfect, mouth-watering bowl of Sarawak laksa. 

Served with a generous portion of omelette strips, crunchy bean sprouts, chicken shreds, and plump prawns as well as a squeeze of calamansi lime for extra zest and thick sambal paste on the side. 

The late Anthony Bourdain called Sarawak Laksa, ‘The breakfast of the Gods’. 

#Laksa #Kuching Breakfast of the Gods

A post shared by anthonybourdain (@anthonybourdain) on May 28, 2015 at 6:57pm PDT

 

One of the best places to find a fiiine bowl of Laksa is at Chong Choon Cafe. Remember, Sarawak laksa is a breakfast dish, so it sells out by around 10 am.

Other must-try dishes in Kuching include Kolo Mee at Annie Kolo Mee or Oriental Park Cafe and authentic Sarawakian tribal food at Tribal Stove the Dyak

A beautiful bowl of Kolo Mee. 

One meal with a drink in a traditional Kuching restaurant or coffee shop should cost you no more than US$2-5. Here’s a more comprehensive food guide with tips on where to find cheap eats in Kuching.

How do you pay for stuff?

You can’t use US dollars to pay like in Cambodia. The currency used in Kuching is Ringgit Malaysia (RM). Although some places only accept cash, most places accept credit cards or E-Wallets. 

Some of the E-Wallets you can use are GrabPay, SarawakPay, FavePay, and Boost E-wallet

What’s the internet like?

Ah yes, internet: the lifeline of a digital nomad. 

Connectivity issues can be quite scary if your livelihood depends on the internet. And the Bornean rainforest doesn’t exactly sound like the kind of place you can do seamless Video calls. Buut…

Don’t worry, Kuching has all-around 4G coverage and you can find wifi at almost every cafe. 

The 3 main service providers in Sarawak with solid coverage are Celcom, Maxis and Digi. 

You can pick up a sim card at the airport for as low as US$8 and this will last you a whole month with constant coverage!

Here’s a price comparison between the service providers. 

Where the magic happens… 

Now that you’re settled in and well connected, it’s time to look for a place to work. 

There are a number of co-working spaces available but the main curator of the digital nomad community is iCube Innovation

Source: coworker.imgix.net

They have the most up-to-date facilities if all you want to do is put your head down and get some work done. 

Their packages start from as low as US$36 per month for a hot desk which is substantially lower than co-working spaces in Bali and Chiang Mai where average monthly packages cost US$100 and US$120. 

Other than iCube, other interesting co-working spaces are MaGIC Sarawak and The 381 Hub

If you’d rather work from a new location every day, we’ve got you covered! There are plenty of cafes around town where you can set up shop. Here’s a list of some of the most aesthetically pleasing and work-friendly cafes in and around the city centre: 

  1. Tease by Jase’s Tea House
  2. Commons at The Old Courthouse
  3. The Coffee Clinic
  4. Kai Joo Cafe 
  5. Coffee Obsession

After-work shenanigans

We’re going to give it to you straight. If you’re a party animal, Kuching isn’t for you. [Pro tip: You can always head to Kuala Lumpur and paint the town red there!] 

Drinks and Art. What better way to relax after a long day of work? Source: Aish Mann

However, if you like to unwind and chill with a cold beer and good ambiance, there are a number of places you can try. Note, a bucket of four beers in Kuching usually costs around US$8. 

  1. Bear Garden
  2. Drunk Monkey Old Street Bar
  3. The Wayang
  4. Monkee Bar Bistro
  5. Borneo Rednecks  

A stay in Sarawak isn’t complete without Tuak. Tuak is a Sarawakian rice wine. You can usually find it at bars around Kuching. Try it, but be careful…

What else is there to do?

After working diligently and finishing a few months’ work in a few days, you’re bound to want to do some touring. 

Other than a promising, laid back, and focused environment, there are plenty of activities to help you get close to nature. 

When you’re looking to get out of the city, you can head to sites around Kuching. Check out our articles on the magnificent caves and peculiar wildlife found in Sarawak. You can be soaking in a natural hot spring or exploring millennia-old caves in a matter of hours!

Miri is an interesting destination, more lively than Kuching, it also has the best dive sites in Malaysia. Subscribe to our newsletter to get content like this sent straight into your inbox! 

All in all, Kuching is a perfect destination for digital nomads because of how gentle it is. If you’re a digital nomad looking for an affordable, tranquil place to get some work done, Kuching should definitely be on your radar. 

 

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Malaysia Travel Guide

Heritage Trails in the Highland of Sarawak: From Long Semadoh to Ba Kelalan

Heritage Trails in the Highland of Sarawak: From Long Semadoh to Ba Kelalan

The Long Semadoh region is home to 7 villages, namely Puneng Trusan, Long Telingan, Long Semadoh Rayeh, Long Semadoh Nesab, Long Tanid, Long Beluyu and Long Kerabangan.

Most of the villagers of this region get their income from rice farming, buffalo herding, cow herding and the planting and harvesting of palm oil.

Ba Kelalan is home to the Lun Bawang, Kayan and other ethnicities, with three weekly flights by the 18-seater Twin Otter planes under MASWings, on Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays.

 

DAY 1: The Journey to Long Telingan

The journey to Long Semadoh began in Miri, with a 45 minute flight to Lawas followed by a 2 hour 4WD ride to Long Telingan (one of the longhouses in the Long Semadoh region). On arrival at Long Telingan, the local tour guide gave a short brief on the upcoming trek to the Long Telingan Homestay.

 

The trek was exciting, leading the group over rivers and onto suspended bridges, through farms and jungle areas.

The first stop along the trek was Batu Narit, a megalith that stood upright with spiral carvings. Though most of the meanings for these stones are lost to time, most agree that the stones commonly mark the achievements and lives of important people from the past, stories of legendary strong men such as Upai Semaring (a ‘giant’ that lived in the Ba Kelalan area) or mythical creatures.

For more information on some of the local legends or a more in depth account of experiences trekking in Ba Kelalan, visit the blog Footsteps on Fringe written by Carolyn Hong.

Along the way, the group stopped at the hiding place of the escaping missionaries during World War II. A temporary plaque was placed to mark the area where the missionaries stayed.

Tapak tempat tinggal C.Hudson isteri Winsome Southwell bersama Geraldine Anderson (isteri kepada Resident Limbang) Dari March-August 1942.

John Wilfinger menyertai mereka sejak mei 1942. August-September mereka bersembunyi di sungai matang. 21st sept. mereka kembali dalam perjalanan untuk menyertai diri. Atas arahan tentera Jepun.

1 October mereka memulakan perjalanan ke sundar selama 9 hari kemudian dibawa ke Brunei sebagai tahanan rumah sebelum dibawa ke Batu Lintang”

 

Translation:

“This is was the hiding place of C. Hudson his wife Winsome Southwell together with Geraldine Anderson (wife to the Resident of Limbang) From March – August 1942.

John Wilfinger joined them in May 1942.

August – September, they hid at Sungai Matang. On the 21st of September, they continued their journey resulting in surrender.

At the order of the Japanese soldiers, on 1st October they began their 9 day journey to Sundar.

They were later brought to Brunei and kept under house arrest before being brought to Batu Lintang.”

The trek ended as the group arrived at Long Telingan homestay for the night.

 

DAY 2: Onwards to Ba Kelalan

After leaving the Long Telingan Homestay, the group stopped along the Tagang River at Long Lidung.

The river is so full of fish, one can even try their hand at hand fishing.

Instructions from the Master

First attempt

Success!

 

The group then traveled by 4WD for two hours on the logging roads to Ba Kelalan. They stopped over Buduk Aru Missionary Bible School and visited the Pendita Meripa and Pendita Ganit memorial. Pendita Meripa and Pendita Ganit in fact the honorable names bestowed upon Reverend Alan Francis Belcher and his wife Reverend Madge Belcher by the locals, two well recognized and loved individuals who spent their days translating the bible to the local Lun Bawang and Lun Dayeh languages.

 

Before retiring to the Buduk Nur homestay, they stopped at the house of their driver and guide Mr. Robert Agong, where they viewed the creation of the local traditional crafts to be sold. These include the local bead necklaces, belts and sashes, traditional clothes as well as house decorations of the Lun Bawang people.

DAY 3: Farewell

As the group prepared to return to Miri, they contemplated their experiences among the Lun Bawang and Lun Dayeh people.

They remarked on the genuine and warm ‘highlander hospitality’, on the wonder of the stories of Upai Semaring and other mythical warriors as well as the strong bonds between the different Lun Bawang and Lun Dayeh communities in Sarawak, Sabah, Brunei and Kalimantan. They did not have the opportunity to attend the Irau Aco Lun Bawang Festival held in June, but were regaled with tales and shown pictures of the joy and fellowship the event brought the local communities.

The journeys over paddy fields, past mountains, across rivers and through rainforests were breathtaking and unlike anything anywhere else; a challenge and a memorable adventure.

 

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Article source: http://sarawaktourism.com/blog/feed/

Categories
Malaysia Travel Guide

Heritage Trails in the Highland of Sarawak: From Long Semadoh to Ba Kelalan

Heritage Trails in the Highland of Sarawak: From Long Semadoh to Ba Kelalan

The Long Semadoh region is home to 7 villages, namely Puneng Trusan, Long Telingan, Long Semadoh Rayeh, Long Semadoh Nesab, Long Tanid, Long Beluyu and Long Kerabangan.

Most of the villagers of this region get their income from rice farming, buffalo herding, cow herding and the planting and harvesting of palm oil.

Ba Kelalan is home to the Lun Bawang, Kayan and other ethnicities, with three weekly flights by the 18-seater Twin Otter planes under MASWings, on Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays.

 

DAY 1: The Journey to Long Telingan

The journey to Long Semadoh began in Miri, with a 45 minute flight to Lawas followed by a 2 hour 4WD ride to Long Telingan (one of the longhouses in the Long Semadoh region). On arrival at Long Telingan, the local tour guide gave a short brief on the upcoming trek to the Long Telingan Homestay.

 

The trek was exciting, leading the group over rivers and onto suspended bridges, through farms and jungle areas.

The first stop along the trek was Batu Narit, a megalith that stood upright with spiral carvings. Though most of the meanings for these stones are lost to time, most agree that the stones commonly mark the achievements and lives of important people from the past, stories of legendary strong men such as Upai Semaring (a ‘giant’ that lived in the Ba Kelalan area) or mythical creatures.

For more information on some of the local legends or a more in depth account of experiences trekking in Ba Kelalan, visit the blog Footsteps on Fringe written by Carolyn Hong.

Along the way, the group stopped at the hiding place of the escaping missionaries during World War II. A temporary plaque was placed to mark the area where the missionaries stayed.

Tapak tempat tinggal C.Hudson isteri Winsome Southwell bersama Geraldine Anderson (isteri kepada Resident Limbang) Dari March-August 1942.

John Wilfinger menyertai mereka sejak mei 1942. August-September mereka bersembunyi di sungai matang. 21st sept. mereka kembali dalam perjalanan untuk menyertai diri. Atas arahan tentera Jepun.

1 October mereka memulakan perjalanan ke sundar selama 9 hari kemudian dibawa ke Brunei sebagai tahanan rumah sebelum dibawa ke Batu Lintang”

 

Translation:

“This is was the hiding place of C. Hudson his wife Winsome Southwell together with Geraldine Anderson (wife to the Resident of Limbang) From March – August 1942.

John Wilfinger joined them in May 1942.

August – September, they hid at Sungai Matang. On the 21st of September, they continued their journey resulting in surrender.

At the order of the Japanese soldiers, on 1st October they began their 9 day journey to Sundar.

They were later brought to Brunei and kept under house arrest before being brought to Batu Lintang.”

The trek ended as the group arrived at Long Telingan homestay for the night.

 

DAY 2: Onwards to Ba Kelalan

After leaving the Long Telingan Homestay, the group stopped along the Tagang River at Long Lidung.

The river is so full of fish, one can even try their hand at hand fishing.

Instructions from the Master

First attempt

Success!

 

The group then traveled by 4WD for two hours on the logging roads to Ba Kelalan. They stopped over Buduk Aru Missionary Bible School and visited the Pendita Meripa and Pendita Ganit memorial. Pendita Meripa and Pendita Ganit in fact the honorable names bestowed upon Reverend Alan Francis Belcher and his wife Reverend Madge Belcher by the locals, two well recognized and loved individuals who spent their days translating the bible to the local Lun Bawang and Lun Dayeh languages.

 

Before retiring to the Buduk Nur homestay, they stopped at the house of their driver and guide Mr. Robert Agong, where they viewed the creation of the local traditional crafts to be sold. These include the local bead necklaces, belts and sashes, traditional clothes as well as house decorations of the Lun Bawang people.

DAY 3: Farewell

As the group prepared to return to Miri, they contemplated their experiences among the Lun Bawang and Lun Dayeh people.

They remarked on the genuine and warm ‘highlander hospitality’, on the wonder of the stories of Upai Semaring and other mythical warriors as well as the strong bonds between the different Lun Bawang and Lun Dayeh communities in Sarawak, Sabah, Brunei and Kalimantan. They did not have the opportunity to attend the Irau Aco Lun Bawang Festival held in June, but were regaled with tales and shown pictures of the joy and fellowship the event brought the local communities.

The journeys over paddy fields, past mountains, across rivers and through rainforests were breathtaking and unlike anything anywhere else; a challenge and a memorable adventure.

 

Share

Article source: http://sarawaktourism.com/blog/feed/

Categories
Tourism Malaysia

In Johor, Everything Is Awesome!

2016 is almost over and if there’s ever a time to pack up and leave with your family, it’s now! Holidays were made for us to unplug and reconnect with the people we love, especially our family. It’s also a time where anyone of any age can relax and unwind. Once in a while, we need to take vacations because we can always make a living but we can’t always make memories.  And what better way to make memories than in Johor

To make it easier, let us help you plan the perfect weekend trip to Johor!

Saturday

legoland-zie-blog-article-6

Lego® Kingdom

Legoland; the name itself can awaken our inner child. A land where all our imaginations have been put to life. Once you step into the Lego world, you can’t help but to feel young again. The architecture, the rides and even the food will leave you wanting more. It is safe to say that Legoland is the perfect location for a family trip, especially if you have young children.

legoland-zie-blog-article-16

KLCC – Miniland

One of the places that you’ll find yourself revisiting would probably be the Miniland. A few minutes wouldn’t be enough because you’ll be mesmerized by all the intricate details of each model. There’s a total of 18 iconic places that you can find in Miniland, such as Cambodia, Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, Johor, Myanmar, Indonesia, Kuala Lumpur and many more.

Don’t forget to look out for the newly upgraded Miniland KL Cluster that features iconic architectures of the city such as Petaling Street, National Monument and Bukit Bintang. Over 3 million lego bricks are used to complete the upgraded KL cluster.

Don’t be afraid to zoom in because it’s even more amazing when you’re up-close.

legoland-zie-blog-article-5

Lego® Ninjago™ World

End your day with a bang by getting a ride on Asia’s first 4D Indoor Ride! Ninjago is the newest edition to the Legoland rides and it certainly lives to its expectation. Many lined up to get a spot on their interactive ride and boy was it fun! You’ll have the chance to be heroes and defeat the “Great Devourer” (the main villain of the story-led experience) with your bare hands. Thanks to all new sensor technology, you’ll have full control of your actions, giving it a new meaning to indoor rides.

During the ride, you’ll be divided into teams of 4, each competing to see which team scores the highest. The rules of the ride are quite simple actually, you’ll only need to use your hands to guide the controls, aiming at the targets to engage. The ride takes about 3-5 minutes to complete but rest assured that every second you spend inside is going to be filled with fun.

Sunday

legoland-zie-blog-article-12

Hello Kitty Town – Wishful Studio

Before leaving Johor, you should pay a visit to one of Legoland’s awesome neighbours.  Just 5 km away lies another attraction that your kids would definitely want to visit. Hello Kitty Town was built to put a smile on children’s faces. For girls especially, it’s practically a dream come true.

There’s a handful of fun activities to do inside, such as a taking a tour inside Hello Kitty’s house, watch performances on the “Purrfect Stage”, spin on their “Tea Cup Rides” and many more. The best of all is probably the “Wishful Studio”; where we get to create our own Hello Kitty themed souvenirs such as the Hello Kitty Handkerchiefs and Hello Kitty Cookies!

legoland-zie-blog-article-15

Thomas Town

Hello Kitty town might not sound that appealing to the boys but thankfully there’s another famous town that is just upstairs! Thomas Town is located on the top floor of the building and they have more rides compared to Hello Kitty Town, such as the Knapford Station Thomas Train Ride, Colin Crane Drop ride, Bertie the Bus and many more. You’ll definitely have fun when experiencing the Bumping Buffers Steamies Diesels Ride aka bumper cars!

legoland-zie-blog-article-8

Other Characters – Barney Live Show

The fun doesn’t stop there, there’s also other characters such as Angelina Ballerina, Pingu, Bob The Builder and Barney. Throughout the day, there are live performances on every level so your little ones can meet all their favourite characters. Children have the chance to sing, dance and interact with characters that they usually see on TV. What a treat!

Since tickets for Hello Kitty Town and Thomas Town + Other Characters are sold separately, we suggest that if you prefer more rides and other interactive activities, Thomas Town + Other Characters would be a more suitable choice. However, we recommended that you obtain the “All Park Access” so your children won’t miss out on any of their favourite characters.

Here are some friendly tips to make your trip easier:

1.Buy your tickets online to avoid waiting in line.

2. If possible, use your own transport so you’ll be in full control of your activities.

3. Arrive early.

4. Bring water bottles, snacks, hats and hand-fans.

5. Visit the souvenir stores as the last stop to avoid extra baggage.

6. Bring EXTRA clothes in Legoland because there’s going to be some water games.

Book your tickets now and get ready for the time of your life!

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

Categories
Tourism Malaysia

Putrajaya Flower and Garden Festival (FLORIA)

Putrajaya Flower and Garden Festival (FLORIA)

FLORIA Putrajaya is an annual floral eventuality where a far-reaching accumulation of flower class from opposite regions displayed within pleasing gardens. Some of a countries holding partial embody Brunei, China, Denmark, Italy, Kenya, Korea, Netherlands, Philiphines, USA, Russia, Kenya, Singapore, Spain, Taiwan, South Africa, Thailand and Vietnam.

 

30th May – 7th Jun 2015

Venue: Tapak Floria, Presint 4, Putrajaya

Organizer: Putrajaya Floria Sdn. Bhd Perbadanan Putrajaya

Phone: 03-8000 8000

Email: [email protected]

www.floriaputrajaya.com.my

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