Categories
Tourism Malaysia

20 Activities to Thrill you in Malaysia

Some
people are thrill-seekers by nature, and are always on the hunt for that
adrenaline rush, no matter where it brings them!

Speed,
excitement, bumps and bruises, even a scar or two makes it all worth it, body
aches and all!

If that is what you crave for, and thrilling spills are your game, then this is a list for you!

  1. ATV Ride, KL

ATVs, or All-Terrain Vehicles,  allows you to ride across rough terrains and lush greenery, going off-road in chase of that adventure just within and beyond the Malaysian forests. As with any outdoor activity, just be sure to bring water and an extra change of clothes. Rain is almost always expected, even though not anticipated!

Picture from http://www.atvadventurepark.com

2. Bungee Jumping

Bungee jumping is most definitely NOT for the faint-hearted. However, if thrills is what you’re looking for, then it is just the extreme activity for you! For those adrenaline junkies just waiting to leap through thin air, one of the places one can do this is at the Extreme Park of Sunway Lagoon.

Picture from www.makemytrip.com

3. Flyboarding in Putrajaya

Flyboarding, another exciting extreme water sport, is one that will
literally take you to greater heights!

This unique sporting experience is achieved by attaching a PWC (Personal Water Craft), which propels the Flyboard into the air, with the use of air and water. At the moment, this sport is only available at Marina Putrajaya.

Picture courtesy of Pamela Arissa Teow

4. Paragliding

Tandem paragliding is available not too far out of Kuala Lumpur, and is available year-round, subject to weather conditions. Currently, two main venues for this activity is in Selangor and Sabah.

Picture from www.paragliding.my

5. Hiking Trekking

While
some might argue on the ‘extremeness’ of these activities, try a 3-day 2-night
trekking trip to the Mulu Pinnacles!

For some laidback, family-friendly activity, this most basic back-to-nature activity suits almost all age groups, with varying levels of strength and stamina. Most of the hiking trails here will lead you to a waterfall or river, and you will most definitely be rewarded with a cool dip after all the hard work.

6. White Water Rafting

From beginner to hardcore level, white water rafting is available in many parts of Malaysia; in Sg Gopeng, Slim River in Perak and Sungai Singor, which lies on the border of Perak and Kelantan.

7. Diving

Perhaps
the ‘mildest’ of extreme sports, diving will transport you to a whole new
colourful and exciting world!

This activity is offered almost throughout Malaysia, from Kedah to Johor; from Perak all the way to Sabah. The islands of Langkawi, Pangkor, Sibu, Perhentian, Tioman, all the way to the world-famour Sipadan, all waiting to mesmerize you with all that they have to offer. 

8. Wreck Diving

What differentiates wreck diving with open water diving is that wreck diving is the exploration of the wreckage of ships, aircraft and other artificial structures. However, most wreck dive sites are at shipwrecks. To be able to participate in wreck diving, one must be the minimum age of 18 years, must be certified as an Advanced open water diver, show proof of at least fifty logged dives, and must also be certified as Basic Wreck or Cavern or equivalent.

Picture from https://asiavacations.biz

9. Ziplining

Ziplining, or more commonly referred to as flying fox, is an activity consisting of a pulley suspended on a cable, usually made of stainless steel, mounted on a slope. It is to enable one to travel via natural gravity, from the highest point to the bottom of the inclined cable, while being attached to a free-moving pulley.

There are many places now which offers such activity, including extreme parks and nature-themed activity parks, including in Sabah and Langkawi.

Picture from https://naturallylangkawi.my

10. Parasailing

Parasailing is a recreational kiting activity where a person is towed behind a vehicle while attached to a specially designed canopy wing that resembles a parachute, known as a parasail wing. The manned kite’s moving anchor may be a car, truck, or boat.

Picture from www.getmyboat.com

11. Via Ferrata, Mount Kinabalu

A Via Ferrata (or ‘iron road’ in Italian, plural via ferrate) is a protected mountain pathway consisting of a series of rungs, rails, cables and bridges embracing the rock face. It allows access to scenic sections of the mountains that are typically available only to rock climbers and mountaineers (ref: www.mountkinabalu.com).

There are some minimum requirements for those who would like to engage in this activity, but rest assured the use of modest equipment, a good head for heights and basic technique, walking the Via Ferrata is very safe, led by an experienced guide.

Mountain Torq is the World’s highest via ferrata and Asia’s first via ferrata is located at Mt Kinabalu’s Panalaban rock face. Starting at 3,200 metres and ends at 3,776 metres above sea level at Mount Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysian Borneo.

The minimum requirements needed for the first time via ferrate climber are:

  • Average fitness level (Able to hike up to 3,200m in 6 hrs)
  • Ages 10 and above for Walk the Torq
  • Ages 17 and above for Low’s Peak Circuit
  • A minimum height of 1.3 metres
  • Free of restricting physical disabilities, be fit, healthy, and without fear of heights to fully participate and safely enjoy the activity
  • No prior mountaineering experience required
  • A maximum of 6 climbers per group is allowed to do Via Ferrata at a time (ref: www.mountkinabalu.com).
Picture from www.amazingborneo.com

12. Microlight

Microlight is a 1- or 2-seater fixed-wing aircraft which is mostly simulated by the hang-gliding movement. It is relatively new in Malaysia.

Picture from www.onedaypilot.com

13. BASE Jumping

BASE Jumping is the sport of jumping off non-moving structures or hills or mountains, and one MUST be a qualified skydiver before attempting BASE jumping. Annually, KL Tower hosts the KL Tower International BASE Jump (www.menarakl.com.my) bringing international BASE Jumpers for a series of jumps organised around Malaysia.

Picture from runawaybella.com

14. Skydiving

Skydiving, undeniably, will give you an adrenaline rush like so other! Leaping out of a moving aeroplane, and feeling the wind hitti g your face is not an easy thrill t0 forget, and definitely NOT for everybody!

Picture from discoverkl.com

If jumping out of planes are not your thing, then perhaps you can tiptoe into the sport by first trying it indoors? Yes, INDOORS! Head to 1-Utama Shopping Mall in Petaling Jaya where Airrider is located.

15. Shark Diving

Fancy a swim among the hammerheads?

Picture from jomdiving.com

Diving
offers one the unique experience of discovering life underwater. The colours
and variety of marine life is incomparable to any on land. If you enjoy the
green lush rainforests, then you will be mesmerized by the darting micro life
and gentle giants of the ocean.

Shark
diving offers you a thrill like no other, and if you feel a bit apprehensive,
beginners may try the indoor, controlled environment offered by Aquaria KLCC.

16. Caving

There are hundreds of caves in Malaysia and cave enthusiasts will be spoilt for choice, ranging  from the massive remote caves of Mulu National Park to popular tourists spots just within the city limits like Batu Caves.

Merapoh Caves Pahang

Some
caves like Gua Tempurung in Perak is quite accessible as the entrance are close
to main roads, similar to Batu Caves, while some are accessible only via
trekking or even by boat.

17. Wakeboarding

Wakeboarding, very simply, is skateboarding on water. You simply surf across the surface of the water behind a speeding motorboat.

The sport is rather new in Malaysia, but steadily garnering a following amongst thrill-seekers and adrenaline junkies alike!

Currently, there are two places you can try and indulge this this wet and wild water sport, and they are at The Mines (Philea Mines Beach Resort) and Marina Putrajaya.

Picture from www.getmyboat.com

18. Kayaking within the Langkawi Geopark

Kayaking is rather easy, and most people would have tried it at least once in their life time. Kayaking in the Langkawi Geopark however, is an experience that is not available elsewhere!

Maneuvering the winding turns of the mangroves of Langkawi provides a taste of adventure and some exercise while enjoying being surrounded by nature. The trip will also offer the chance for a good close up to the ecology of the mangroves especially the wildlife such as monkeys, pit vipers, eagles, otters, some endemic birds and the common monitor lizard.

Picture from www.jomjalan.com

19. Waterfall Abseiling

Stepping off the edge of rocks into a fast-cascading waterfall. Sounds exciting and most challenging!

Abseiling is the sport of repelling down a set of lines along waterfalls which can reach any height you dare to try, depending on your level of expertise. Like any other extreme sport, safety first!

Picture from https://riverbug.asia

20. Rock Climbing

Rock climbing requires a certain skill set and strength, and definitely not for the faint-hearted!

The most popular site will have to be Batu Caves in Selangor, and has about 170 routes available. With that many routes, the site offers a challenge for all levels of climbers.  

Malaysia being a tropical country, the weather can rather unpredictable, but do not fret! We do have the largest indoor rock climbing facility in Asia, Camp 5, located on the 5th floor of 1 Utama Shopping Centre. It is the largest climbing gym, standing at 24m high and is fully air-conditioned. The gym also offers a 270-degree panoramic view of the city, a café and a climbing workshop. 400 boulders, lead routes and top ropes, suited for all, ranging from beginners to advanced is available here. Routes are altered and changed every 3 – 6 months, keeping things fresh and challenging.

Picture from www.tourismselangor.my

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

Categories
Malaysia Travel Guide

Bizarre wildlife found in the jungles of exotic Borneo

Ask any Malaysian what is the first thing that comes to mind when they think of Sarawak and we bet most of them would give you the same answer: Magnificent mountains, wildlife, age-old rainforests, beautiful beaches and colossal caves.

This natural landscape allows for extraordinary biodiversity to exist while nurturing some of the world’s best-kept secrets… Or should we say, creatures? Most people have heard stories about the ubiquitous Hornbill that’s emblemetic to Sarawak but what’s out there that maybe you haven’t heard about?

Read on and learn about some of the most exotic and adorable, (OK sometimes!) animals that call our beautiful jungle home. We’ll even tell you where you can find them so you can play your own fun game of “Where’s Waldo?” Malaysian Wildlife edition! Believe us, there is #MoreSarawak than you know!

Horsfield’s Tarsier

These adorable little critters look eerily similar to a particular character from Star Wars. If you’re guessing Yoda, you’re right! Except that they don’t talk in riddles or read your minds – their superpower lies in their excellent leaping and climbing skills.

They are nocturnal, but thankfully, their big eyes to help them manoeuvre in the dark. Interesting fact, the size of one eyeball of the Horsfield’s Tarsier is the same as their brain. This makes them the largest-eyed mammal in the world relative to their body size!

Tarsier clinging to a branch

Photo by Christine Wehrmeier on Unsplash

Don’t be fooled by their cute demeanour, though! They are the only living carnivorous primate species. They feed on insects and small invertebrates, using their sharp sense of hearing and their nifty hands to detect and ensnare their prey.

Where to find them: Mulu National Park

Sun Bear

Even though they’re small, they can be very aggressive so if you see one, don’t mistake it for a cuddly teddy bear! The sun bear is arboreal, so you’ll need to keep your eyes on the trees if you want to see one and you can only see them in our rain forests in Southeast Asia.

They are essential to our ecosystem because they help disperse seeds while also keeping pesky termites in check, which means there is less destruction of our tropical trees which in turn means our atmosphere is clean enough for us to live healthily.

When they do come down from the trees, they also dig for invertebrates in the soil, enhancing the forest’s nutrient cycle through the mixing of rich and poor soil. Unfortunately, their global population has declined 30% over the last few years, making them the second rarest bear species next to the Giant Panda.

wildlife in Borneo - sun bear

iStock: wrangel

Their tongues are up to 25 cm long and help them to satiate their voracious appetite for honey. Because of this, they are also sometimes known as “honey bears”. You can tell the Sun Bear apart from other bear species from the horseshoe marks on their chest. Fun fact: No two markings are the same!

Where to see them: Matang Wildlife Centre

Microhyla Nepenthicola

If that’s too much of a mouthful, you can call it the “Matang narrow-mouthed frog”. That’s only the easy part. Spotting one of these rare creatures in the wild is, well rare! This newly discovered species is the second smallest frog in the world, around the size of a pea, and they make their homes around pitcher plants. They can only be found near Mount Serapi which is located in Kubah National Park.

wildlife in Borneo - second smallest frog in the world

Source: Reuters

They were discovered after scientists tracked the unique and powerful croaks of the males. Talk about a little body with a big voice! Because they were only discovered recently, not much is known about them. However, if you are lucky enough to spot one, make sure you are wearing ear plugs!

Where to find them: Kubah National Park

Sambar Deer

Did you know that the heaviest recorded Sambar Deer weighed an eye watering 550kg?! That’s slightly more than half a ton! So if you do go looking for the Sambar deer, make sure you are wearing running shoes!

sambar deer at matang wildlife center

Source: Matang Widlife Center

Despite their relatively large stature, these animals are pretty elusive; They are only really active at dusk and at night. When disturbed, their first instinct is to freeze before responding to predators with loud barks and foot stomping.

If that isn’t enough to frighten anyone or anything, their mane will rise in a confrontational manner! Imagine this half-a-ton of muscle and jungle survivor towering over you! Like I said, make sure you are wearing running shoes.

Where to find them: Mulu National Park and Matang Wildlife Center

Lesser Mouse Deer

Don’t be fooled by its name! Even though they look like a combination of a mouse and a cute deer, the mouse deer is neither a mouse nor a deer! Confusing I know but you can’t blame us for its name!

These shy, mysterious little critters are less than 50cm long and can be found on forest floors feeding on leaves, shoots, fruits and sometimes even fungi. With round bodies and spindly legs, they look almost like plush toys!

lesser mouse deer

Source: critterfacts.com

But while they may look like toys, peek inside a Mouse Deer’s mouth (we don’t recommend you do so), and you’ll find long fangs that give Dracula a run for his money!

Despite being land mammals, they can also hold their breath for up to four minutes and to escape prey, they’ll often leap into water and actually scurry across river beds to avoid getting caught! Yes, they can even hold their breath for 4 minutes underwater!

Due to their small size, they are commonly preyed upon by other animals, so they have to live quiet and secluded lives. However, a male will angrily beat his hooves when agitated or to ward off predators and warn other Mouse Deer of danger.

Where to find them: Lambir Hills National Park

Hornbill

There are so many things to be said about our state mascot. Sporting majestic beaks, Hornbills have impressive neck muscles (to support the weight of their regal bills) and are incredibly loyal to their families. They mate for life and will bond to defend each other against predators!

These beautiful feathered creatures also have their own ‘language’ – They speak to each other in a sort of morse code! It’s been said that the noise resembles that of a steam engine. This form of ‘communication’ is especially important and it’s how a male Hornbill sends messages to his mate through the barricade she makes during her nesting period.

rhinocerous hornbill

Source: Casper1774 Studio/Shutterstock

Hornbills have a great significance in Dayak culture. For them, Hornbills signify the spirit of God, and they have to be treated with respect. It is said that if a Hornbill is sighted flying over their residences, good luck will be granted to the whole community!

Altogether there are 54 species of Hornbills in the world, 8 of which are found in Sarawak! No wonder Sarawak is known as the “Land of the Hornbills”.

Where to find them: Piasau Nature Reserve, Mulu National Park, Tanjung Datu National Park and Batang Ai National Park

Slow Loris

Tiny, cute, big eyes… But not cuddly! Although they look adorable, these nocturnal creatures are one of the few venomous mammals in the world.

slow lorris clinging to tree branch

Source: wordatlas.com

Surf the internet long enough and you might recall watching a video of a Slow Loris getting tickled. What many people don’t know is that the pose of the Slow Loris of its arms raised is a defensive pose and not one of enjoyment.

Unfortunately, not many people knew this, and when this video gained traction, many people wanted to own Slow Lorises as pets because of how ‘cute’ it looked.

As slow lorises are venomous with a potentially deadly bite, their sharp pointed teeth are often clipped with nail cutters without anaesthesia for the pet trade.

This makes the pet trade one of the greatest threats to the survival of this species, which places them as vulnerable on the IUCN red list. Here in Sarawak we’re protecting all our Slow Loris as best we can. Have fun looking for them but don’t try and tickle them!

Where to find them: Bako National Park

Share

Little Known Secrets of the Beads of Borneo

Meeting Borneo’s Majestic Orangutans

Cycling for Charity in Sarawak

Kuching Caving | Gua Sireh  Broken Jar

Seeing Green in Bario

Fine tradition of longevity noodle making kept alive

Article source: http://sarawaktourism.com/blog/feed/

Categories
Malaysia Travel Guide

SARAWAK SPREADS HER “PROMOTIONAL WINGS” TO ASIA

Kuching – August 13th: The Sarawak Tourism Board (‘STB’) has added another milestone in her efforts to boost Sarawak’s tourism through a collaborative effort with AirAsia and Laduni Services Sdn Bhd. to ensure that Sarawak’s brand will be widely seen on selected aircrafts flying in the region.

Minister thumb up sarawak tourism board air asia cabin ad panel

YB Datuk Abdul Karim Rahman Hamzah, Minister of Tourism, Arts, Culture, Youth and Sports Sarawak giving thumbs up to one of Sarawak Ad Panel on AirAsia aircraft witness by Sharzede Datu Haji Salleh Askor, CEO of STB and Dato Aziz Bakar, AirAsia Board of Director.

Through this collaboration, the overhead cabin compartments of 5 AirAsia planes will be prominently adorned with visuals depicting Sarawak as a destination full of life, vibrancy and excitement, showcasing various attractions of Sarawak’s culture, adventure, nature, food and festivals.

The collaboration was officiated by the Minister of Tourism, Arts, Culture, Youth and Sports Sarawak, YB Datuk Abdul Karim Rahman Hamzah at a signing ceremony held at the Kuching International Airport today.

This promotional effort on the 5 aircrafts involves AirAsia Malaysia and AirAsia Thailand, reaching out to 6 countries around Asian countries for duration of one year. Some of the key destinations include Kuala Lumpur, Miri, Kota Kinabalu, Langkawi, Johor Bharu, Kuala Terengganu, Alor Setar, Penang and Kuching in Malaysia, Bangkok, Phuket and Chiang Mai in Thailand, Chennai, Kochi and Kolkata in India, Ho Chi Min City, Danang, Hanoi in Vietnam, Medan and Jakarta in Indonesia, Phnom Penh and Siam Rep in Cambodia, Chongqing, Hangzhou, Kunming and Shenzhen in China, Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei and Singapore.

In addition, Sarawak will also be featured in the coveted 360 inflight magazine and other digital platforms at KLIA2.

YB Datuk Abdul Karim Rahman Hamzah said: “We hope that this promotional initiative will be able to give Sarawak greater brand visibility in the region targeting the correct audience among travellers. It serves to convey not only our promotional messages but a chance to showcase our State’s iconic visuals including the UNESCO World Heritage Site of the Mulu National Park, Sarawak Laksa, Tusan beach, Rainforest World Music Festivals and the Rafflesia flower amongst others.”

Flight connectivity has always been a key structural challenge for the State. It is hoped that promotional efforts such as this will enhance visibility in prime catchment areas within the region.

Echoing the Minister, STB’s CEO Sharzede Datu Salleh Askor said, “Sarawak tourism sees this private-public sector collaboration as a good synergy and consolidated initiative to promote Sarawak to its key target markets. Sarawak has many hidden gems that are waiting to be discovered and aircrafts are certainly one of the best platforms to boost visibility and capture tourists travelling around the Asian countries mentioned.”

Sharzede added that STB is also going strongly on promotions in the digital media realm to capture air travellers who are IT savvy, many of whom tend to use Online Travel Agencies (OTAs), for their travels.

This latest collaboration follows the earlier ‘Visit Sarawak Campaign’ AirAsia aircraft livery, which was launched on February 2, this year. These are among STB’s promotional strategy to create visibility for Sarawak in the domestic and International markets.

Share

Article source: http://sarawaktourism.com/blog/feed/

Categories
Tourism Malaysia

20 Destinations in Malaysia for the Eco-Traveler

Eco-Traveler.

Who, and what exactly. is the
Eco-traveller?

According to the International Ecotourism
Society, eco-travel  is
“responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment,
sustains the well-beings and involves interpretation and education”

It basically begs the question of how we can travel greener? Yes, be that
person who is conscious of their natural surroundings, and strive to minimize the
impact of their presence to the environment.

How can we be ‘greener’?

First of all, educate yourself. Learn about the natural resources and attractions of the area. See how you can create as minimal an impact as possible, keeping the destination or attraction as pure as possible for future visitors.

Canopy Walk in Taman Negara

One very good way to learn is by volunteering. There are many
ways a person can participate in volunteerism,
and this way, the benefits are two-thronged – both parties gain a little from
the experience.

Another way is by incorporating good, ‘green’ habits in your
daily life – reduce use of plastic (drinking straws, disposable
containers),  recycle and reuse as much
as possible, and aim for zero-waste, especially food.

Lush green rainforests cover a large area of West Malaysia and regions in Malaysia Borneo, and Malaysia too is home to an impressive diverse marine life. Love the beach? We have that too, in abundance! All of these places welcome visitors. Responsible visitors, more so! Read on!!

Fancy the Jungle?

Some wildlife within the National Park
  1. Sg
    Yu Forest Reserve, Pahang

Located on the edge of Taman Negara Pahang, Sg Yu Forest reserve is a large forest reserve under the Permanent Forest Estate (PFE) of Peninsular Malaysia that is a mixture of secondary and primary forest. The area is home to a number of wildlife, including elephants, tapir, a few species of deer, as well as a variety of hornbills.

If you feel up to it, you could also opt for a guide to visit some ‘Orang Asli’ Settlement which can be found along the river throughout the Park.

2. Royal Belum State Park, Perak

The huge Royal Belum State Park is located in the northern parts of Peninsular Malaysia, and is part of the much larger Belum-Temenggor Forest Complex which is shared with Thailand. Together with Taman Negara Pahang, they form the oldest rainforest in the world at over 130 million years old! Belum has the huge potential of becoming one of Malaysia’s premier eco-tourism destination choice.

The tree tops of the rainforests

There’s much to see and do around Belum State Park. As many of the attractions are located along Lake Temenggor, exploring by boat would be the best option. There are trails to hike, falls and ponds to dip in and cool off, and wildlife to look out for. Boars, tapirs, the white-handed gibbon and the Malaysian sunbear roam free in these jungles, as well as the elusive Malayan tiger. If you’re in luck, you may even stumble across a rafflesia. And don’t forget to look up, in search of the various hornbills within the area.

The small rapids and gushing falls… hard to resist!

3. Kilim Geopark, Langkawi

Part of the UNESCO network of global geoparks, the Langkawi Geopark Forest is first of its kind in the South East Asia Region. It covers 100 square kilometres of nature reserve and countless nature wonders, including flora and fauna.

The beautiful diverse natural geological, biological and cultural resources makes Kilim unique, especially the co-existence of coastal karst and mangrove ecosystems. One recommended way to surround yourself, and embrace the spectrum of geological and natural heritage, is by taking a kayak tour, with an experienced guide of course!

Kilim Geopark – Kayak Adventure

Apart from the rich mangrove flora and geological wonders, look out also for the Pit Viper, whose natural habitat lays within this mangrove.

4. Mulu National Park, Sarawak

If you refer to Gunung Mulu National
Park’s official website, you will learn that “to qualify for world heritage status a property must meet
one of the four following criteria:”

  • Be an
    outstanding example of the world’ geological history (Caves and cave deposits)
  • Be and
    outstanding representative example of on-going evolutionary processes (current research
    programmes)
  • Be of
    exceptional beauty!
  • Contain
    significant natural habitat for in-situ conservation of biological diversity
    and the protection of threatened species (wide range of cave and forest
    habitats).

And amazingly, Mulu meets all four criteria!

The Pinnacles, Mulu National Park

Needless to say, you will be enthralled with all that Mulu National Park has to offer!

5. Penang National Park, Teluk Bahang Penang

While
you can hike to the National Park, it is advisable to take a boat so that you
can cover more area, and experience the different nature attractions within the
Park. Within the park is a rare meromictic lake, a lake of two separate layers
of salt and fresh water do not mix. Pick the time and season you visit very
carefully because the wrong timing will see the lake rather dry!

Further along the beach, you will find the Penang Turtle Sanctuary. Here, Green Turtles and Olive Ridley Turtles are the two most common species that come to lay their eggs.

Turtle Hatcheries

Perhaps experience a jungle within a
city?

If you are in a rush, and can only squeeze in a quick visit, and yet still wish enjoy a bit of nature, then consider the following in-the-city rendezvous places.

6. National Botanical Park, Shah Alam Selangor

The National Botanical Park in Shah Alam covers and impressive 72 hectares, and is among the favourite destinations for locals to experience a bit of nature and provide some fun education for their kids. There are farm animals, an aviary, and some other common small mammals for the kids to enjoy and interact with.

The National Botanical Park

7. FRIM, Selangor

FRIM, or the Forest Research Institute Malaysia, is one of the leading institutions in tropical forestry research. An introduction in its official website states that 545-ha site “was gazetted as a Natural Heritage Site on 10 February 2009 under the National Heritage Act 2005, and officially declared as a National Heritage on 10 May 2012. FRIM is working towards attaining the recognition as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.”

Visitors are welcome to picnic, trek or even camp within their grounds, limited to the visitor guidelines issued by the Institute. Bird watching is another encouraged activity within FRIM’s grounds.

8. Bukit Nanas Forest Reserve, Kuala Lumpur

Recently renamed KL Forest Eco-Park, the Bukit Nanas Forest Reserve is a small patch of rainforest located in the heart of Kuala Lumpur, at the base of the KL Tower, one of the tallest telecommunications structures in the world. This small patch of greenery within the bustling city preserves many species and features of the original rainforest that covered Kuala Lumpur a long time ago.

Nature Vs Technology

There are several trails that run through the reserve, but are mainly to one side of the hill. The main entrance is located near Jalan Raja Chulan but it is most convenient to take the KL LRT and proceed on foot from the Dang Wangi LRT Station.

Bukit Nanas Forest Reserve, Kuala Lumpur

Fancy a bit of diving? Or just snorkeling?

Sandy beaches, clear waters

9. Pulau Perhentian, Terengganu

Located just off the edge of Pulau Redang, Pulau Perhentian, which means ‘stopover island’, should not be missed. The island consists of two islands, Pulau Perhentian Besar (literally Big Island) and Pulau Perhentian Kecil (Small Island). Of the two, the Small Island is preferred due to less development and the absence of huge resorts.

Covered largely by unspoilt jungle, gentle swaying palms, sparkling white powdery beaches and the enticing sapphire gleaming waters, Pulau Perhentian is a sanctuary for fishermen, migratory birds and of course, the discerning holiday-makers. The excellent seascape offers endless opportunity for diving and snorkeling, with gentle turtles and fleeting fishes surrounding you.

10. Pulau Lang Tengah, Terengganu

Located between Redang and Perhentian Islands, Lang Tengah is a precious gem, very low key and not as heavily visited. The clear tropical waters surrounding the island, which is also a designated marine park, are teeming with corals and sea life which occasionally include sharks and rays. Green turtles commonly come to nest during the season which starts from April to October, and the hawksbill turtle makes an occasional appearance as well. The island is also covered with primary forest, and has a wide variety of birds, lizards, frogs and insects.

11. Pulau Tiga, Sabah

Gained ‘popularity’, thanks to the Survivor Series, Pulau Tiga is surrounded by the pristine South China Sea. Once there, you can opt to hike in the jungle, visit the nearby Snake Island to spot some wildlife, or choose to camp in the wilderness. Mud pools are also available for that beauty therapy you’ve been wanting to get!

Leave nothing but footprints!

12. Lankayan Island, Sabah

Slightly differing from all the above, Lankayan is a private luxury island, but would still be much appreciated by the discerning eco-traveller who wouldn’t mind splurging once in a while. They offer luxurious beachfront, as well as over-the-water chalets, for that unique holiday experience.

One of the many islands off Sabah waters

There are 4 dive wrecks to choose from if you fancy a bit of underwater activity, and located along what is known as the ‘Sea Turtle Corridor’ you will not be disappointed!

13. Talang Satang National Marine Park, Sarawak

The Talang Satang National Park is a national
park in Kuching Division, Sarawak, Malaysia. It is Sarawak’s first marine
protected area, and covers the four islands Pulau Talang-Talang Besar, Pulau
Talang-Talang Kecil, Pulau Satang Besar and Pulau Satang Kecil and surrounding
coral reefs.

The Park is mainly set up as a turtle sanctuary,
of which three of the islands are known as Sarawak’s “Turtle Islands”.

Or maybe wildlife are more your thing?

14. Kuala Gandah Elephant Sanctuary, Pahang

The Kuala Gandah Elephant Sanctuary,
which lies within the Krau Wildlife Reserve, is the only one of its kind in
Malaysia. The centre’s main objective is to relocate elephants which natural habitats
have been encroached for development, to a safer, more suitable, permanent area
such as the Taman Negara. Orphaned elephants are also raised and given shelter
here.

The centre welcomes visitors, and is open throughout the year, and conducts various public awareness activities. There is no entrance fees, but donations are welcome. For those interested, there are also volunteer programs available.

15. Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre

Set up in 1964, its main purpose was to
rehabilitate orphaned and displaced orangutans before sending them back into
the forest.

Today, the centre also provides medical care and shelter for other species of wildlife as well, including sun bears, gibbons, Sumatran rhinos and occasionally, elephants.

Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre

Visitors are treated to witnessing the feeding of the orangutans twice a day, from a designated platform and viewing gallery which is accessible via a boardwalk through the forest. Here, visitors aren’t allowed any physical contact with the orangutans to help and keep diseases at bay. Sepilok also had a volunteer program, as well as ‘adopt an orangutan’ program for those who are interested.

16. Tabin Wildlife Reserve, Sabah

Tabin Wildlife Reserve is considered the largest wildlife reserve in Malaysia, comprising an area of approximately 300,000 acres! Tabin was declared a Wildlife Reserve mainly due to the large number of animals inhabiting the forests, some of which are highly endangered. Three of Sabah’s largest mammals are found in Tabin, and they are the Sumatran Rhino, Pygmy Elephant and Tembadau, and many other species of wildlife that are protected.

17. Turtle Island, Sabah

Selingan Island, or more commonly referred to as Turtle Island, is
the second largest of the three islands with an area of 8 hectares and is also
the first turtle hatchery in Malaysia.

The number of visitors who can stay overnight on the island is restricted, and you will need to apply for permits to visit the island. Basic accommodation is available, as the best time to see the turtles lay eggs are after dusk, and there is also a visitor centre where you can learn more about the conservation efforts carried out by the centre all these years.

A turtle laying eggs; leave her tracks behind; park rangers place the eggs in hatcheries

Both Green and Hawksbill Turtles come to shore throughout the year to lay their eggs. However, the peak season for the Greens turtles is between July to October while the peak season for the Hawksbill turtles is between February to April.

18. Semenggoh Nature Reserve, Sarawak

Situated
just a short distance away from the city of Kuching in Sarawak, The Semenggoh Nature
Reserve serves as a mostly-temporary home the gentle Orangutans.  Established in 1975, it initially became a
centre for injured and captured orangutans, and has now developed into a place
where visitors can learn about other rare and endemic species as well. The
orangutans are trained to get back to the centre during their feeding times,
but when it is fruiting season and they can forage for food themselves, they
sometimes do not appear.

Rare
flora and fauna can also be found here, and you will appreciate the sounds of
the jungle when you drop by for a visit.

You may also opt for the cooler highlands…

19. Cameron Highlands, Pahang

Cameron
Highlands is easily the most popular highland retreats in Malaysia, offering a
moderate climate ranging between18 to 25 degrees Celcius.

However, this moderate weather also serves as a ‘curse’ to the destination as the environment makes it an ideal location for growing various produce, both for local consumption as well as for export.

Tea Plantation

During
the Colonial era, the British grew tea on the fertile mountain slopes, and
these plantations exist till today. More suited as a family getaway, places
like Cameron Highlands can offer a pleasant surprise to the discerning eco-tourist.
 

Hiking trails and breathtaking views await you!

20. Fraser’s Hill, Pahang

Fraser’s Hill is one of the
oldest, but less popular, highland resort destination located among the mountains
of Pahang. Only 2 hours away from Kuala Lumpur, this cooling retreat offers
nature activities which include jungle trekking

The iconic Fraser’s Hill clock tower sits in the middle of the quaint village town, always a popular photo spot.

Fraser’s Hill Clock Tower

Fraser’s Hill is also hosts the International Bird Race, which has
been  an annual event since 1988. The
main objectives of the bird race is to encourage the preservation of nature,
considering there are over 250 species of birds within the area, as well as to
promote Fraser’s Hill as a bird sanctuary.

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/

Categories
Tourism Malaysia

7 PLACES TO EXPLORE DURING VISIT SARAWAK YEAR 2019

Established as the Malaysia’s largest state, Sarawak is a haven of natural landscapes with various national parks, nature reserves, wildlife sanctuaries and dozens of attractions that never cease to amaze travellers. Blessed with vibrant cultures from 27 different ethnic groups, this state that is located on the island of Borneo promises exciting escape from the mundane day-to-day life.

Be it the sky, land or sea, Sarawak offers endless excitement, adventure and charm that accommodate both slow-paced leisure and extreme-adventure travellers through its plethora of culture, adventure, nature, food, and festivals. The following are seven places that travellers can visit in 2019 and 2020.

BARIO

Fondly dubbed as ‘the land of a hundred handshakes’, this friendly town is the home of the smallest ethnic group in Sarawak called Kelabit. Known for its traditional crafts and arts, the destination is also home to other tribes like Penan and Lun Bawang. Lying on an altitude of roughly 1,000 metres or 3,500 feet above sea level, this quaint location nestles in the north eastern corner of Sarawak, surrounded by lush, pristine and unpolluted environment, perfect for trekking and sightseeing.

For those who seek more thrilling adventure can opt for kayaking and an arduous five-day and four-night trek through the Bario-Ba’kelalan trail. Those who prefer a more leisurely experience can visit the town during events like Bario Food Festival called Nukenen at the end of July every year and savour exotic delicacies like local pineapples and Bario Rice.

Kampung Mongkos

ust an hour and a half drive from Kuching, this village is situated near Mongkos River and offers homestay accommodations. For those wanting to experience living in the longhouse (a communal wooden house, perched on stilts with separate rooms designated for different families), there are 12 families who open up their homes for travellers to stay with them. The tribe called Bidayuh inhabit these longhouses. Staying at these longhouses directly exposes travellers to the Bidayuh culture, rituals, traditions, and activities.

You can participate in Bidayuh traditional dance called Langgi Aruh, which involves crossing over handheld bamboos that imitate traps as they are enclosed and opened together according to the beat – the idea is not to get trapped as the bamboos enclose and pick up speed. Travellers can also witness other traditional dances like Langgi Sidandut, Langgi Perang and Langi Empujon, each inspired by age-old folklore. Ritualistic ceremonies and exotic food are arranged for travellers to give them educational experience and understanding of the Bidayuh culture.

Enquiries

Koperasi Kampung Mongkos Serian Berhad
Suruhanjaya Koperasi Malaysia, Daerah Serian
94700 Serian, Sarawak
Tel: +6 013 576 4003
GPS: 1°11’23.5″N 110°33’53.6″E

Semenggoh Nature Reserve

Located barely fifteen minutes from Kuching, this nature reserve is a sanctuary to one of the most intelligent primates in the world: the orangutans, which are known for their ability to adopt sign language and utilise rudimentary tools in their daily lives. Predominantly indigenous to Sarawak, orangutans are now critically endangered due to deforestation.

You can meet these wonderful creatures up close at Semenggoh Nature Reserve, where travellers can learn about the orangutans’ habitat and the importance of conservation in protecting this species from extinction. Aimed at reintroducing these apes to the natural environment, Semenggoh Nature Reserve is one of the only sanctuaries in the world for these intelligent creatures to roam free without restriction. This nature reserve also trains these apes in basic survival skills as most of them are rescued at a young age from dangerous conditions. This effort has led to an increase in the species’ population in the wild.

Entrance fees:
Adult Senior Citizen: MYR10
OKU/Disabled: MYR5
Below 18 Years Old: MYR5
Children Below 6 Years old: MYR5
GPS: 1°24’06.1″N 110°18’52.0″E

Mulu National Park

This UNESCO World Heritage site is Sarawak’s largest national park and has been listed since the year 2000. It was the first of its kind to be listed as a World Heritage site in Malaysia. Famed for its limestone, this whopping park covers 544 kilometres squared of lush primary rainforest with varied landscapes criss-crossed by fast flowing rivers and limpid streams.

Dominated by three mountains, this park boasts a number of breathtaking caves like the world’s largest cave passage known as Deer Cave; the formation of the oldest cave in Mulu National Park is said to date back almost five million years ago! Another highlight of this park is the Pinnacles, situated mid-way up the slopes of Gunung Api. This is one of the trekkers’ favourite spots because the view overlooks a series of 45-meter-high limestone towers soaring above surrounding verdure.

Travellers should also head to the world’s longest canopy walk to truly delve into the bustling ecosystem that is more active high up in the trees than the ground. The entrance fee for the Canopy Walk is MYR42, including guide.  Find out more about the canopy walk on http://mulupark.com/tours-activities/uncategorized/canopy/.

Shipwreck Diving at Kuching

For those who love underwater explorations, Kuching is indeed the destination where divers can explore multiple carcasses of wrecked ships that lie at the bottom of the ocean’s floor. After the Pearl Harbour attack during World War II, the Japanese exerted their forces towards South East Asia with Borneo as one of the targets.

This effort, however, was cut short by the Americans and its ally, the Dutch, who attacked the Japanese warships using their submarines in 1941. Despite the brutality of its past, the area now is regarded as one of the most beautiful scuba diving spots, thriving with marine life and corals. There are approximately 19 wrecks located off Kuching’s coast. The nearest wreck is the Katori Maru Wreck that sits at a depth of 22 metres, taking about 50 to 75 minutes by speedboat from Santubong. The best time to dive is between April to September. The most recent wrecks could also be found there, such as the TK Wreck, Thai Seven and Barge Wreck.

Find out more about the diving packages on http://www.wetwolfdive.com/dive%20kuching%20wreck.html

Tanjung Datu

Imagine gazing at the star-studded night sky accompanied by turtles as they lay eggs in the soft white sands of Tanjung Datu’s coastline. Although this is the smallest national park in Sarawak, it is renowned for its purity, untouched beauty, exclusivity and remoteness; from crystal clear water and thriving corals to verdant vegetation that is filled with exotic flora and fauna.

The park is situated on the Datu Peninsula at the south-western tip of Sarawak and is only about 14 square kilometres in size. It takes about half an hour to reach the park from Sematan Town by boat. Since the site bans commercialisation and large scale accommodation, it is safe to say that Tanjung Datu is free from human-induced pollution, making it nature’s wonderland. However, there are four shelters capable of accommodating up to 12 people at one time available at this national park.

For campers, they can set up tents on a site that can hold up to 100 people at a time. A sanctuary for the turtles and many other exotic animals like primates, migratory birds, and wild animals, be sure to properly follow instructions because reckless behaviour might result in considerable risks.

Reservations Enquiries:
National Parks Booking Office
Tel: +6 082 248 088
Online booking: http://ebooking.com.my
GPS: 2°03’19.5″N 109°38’31.9″E

Base Jumping in Sibu

One of the most anticipated events in Sarawak is the Sibu International BASE Jump, where jumpers from all corners of the world rally and jump off the tallest building in Sarawak, Wisman Sanyan. This activity gets spectators’ hearts thumping as they see these jumpers launch themselves off from the top of Wisma Sanyan that is 126 metres high from the ground. Located in Sibu,  dozens of thrill seekers travel to this city to perform BASE (Building, Antennae, Span, and Earth) jumping while enthusiastic spectators gather to watch these daredevils jump off. Compared to skydiving, base-jumping is much cheaper due to the absence of planes and aircraft that would usually cost thousands of ringgits per ride. Organised for the first time in 2009 by Sibu Tourism Task Force Group and BASE jumpers from Australia and Malaysia, this event has now become a highly anticipated annual event.

Enquiries
Tel: +6 084 321 963 / +6 084 330 500
Email: [email protected]
GPS: 2.2904,111.8255
Visit Sibu BASE Jump Facebook page for latest updates and information

Article source: http://blog.tourism.gov.my/feed/