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Malaysia Travel Guide

Beautiful Birds Of The Blue Bornean Skies

The jungles of Borneo are a world like no other. Alive with a smorgasbord of magical wildflowers, exotic, wide-eyed creatures and a cacophony of noise. But what goes on above the dense, magical jungle that keeps our world alive? On a typical day, the skies over Borneo feature a breathtaking array of vibrant colours. Our beautiful birds feature remarkably vivid plumage that paint a delightful canvas against the baby blue tropical backdrop.

Surprisingly, while many people are aware of Sarawak’s diverse ecosystem, not many know we are also home to an array of stunning birds.

So whether you’re an avid birder or just love the site of magnificent creatures swooping effortlessly across the jungle canopy, when you come to Sarawak, don’t forget to look up!

To make it easier, we’ve created a compilation of some of the birds you can expect to see on your next visit. Oh and one other thing, just remember the best time to see these birds is at first light and for an hour or so afterwards.

The Bornean Banded Kingfisher

These skilful divers are rare in Java, scarcer in Sumatra, and extinct in Singapore! Luckily for you, they are flourishing in Sarawak. Although they are small and sometimes difficult to spot, they are strong, excitable and sometimes aggressive, especially when humans are around!

You should be able to recognise them from their sturdy red bills. Once you’ve spotted one, try to track it to a water source and watch it catch fish effortlessly.

All rights reserved by liewwk – www.liewwkphoto.com

You can differentiate males from females by their plumage: The male has a bright blue crown with black and blue banding on the back while the females are rufous with black banding on their head and upperparts.


The call of a Bornean Banded Kingfisher captured by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS

Where to spot them: These nifty hunters can be found in the lowland rainforests of Kubah National Park.

Asian Paradise Flycatcher

Sporting long fancy tails, these birds require a bit more effort to see but are definitely worth the investment. Especially the male as he struts about, flaunting his elegant tail. Chestnut, white or a mixture of both – The plumage of males come in several interesting variations depending on where they are from!

Source: Lawrence Neo 2015

The females look like their chestnut male counterparts, except they have significantly shorter tails and smaller crests.

The call of an Asian Paradise Flycatcher captured by Dato’ Dr Amar-Singh HSS

Where to spot them: They are mostly found in Northern Sarawak, especially in Gunung Mulu National Park and Pulong Tau National Park.

Banded Broadbill

This bird stands out because of their vibrant plumage – against their purplish-black plumage are yellow/lime green markings! They also have piercing blue eyes and a luminescent blue beak that looks like it has been been made-up with “black lipstick”.

Source: Lawrence Neo 2012

In photos, they may look canary-sized, but these birds are actually quite big! Measuring at 21.5cm to 23cm, they feast on insects, especially grasshoppers, crickets, caterpillars and larvae.

The call of a Banded Broadbill captured by Tan Kok Hui

Where to spot them: The Banded Broadbill usually lurk in lowland forests, so you can expect to see them at Kubah National Park, Mulu National Park and Batang Ai National Park.

Bornean Bristlehead

This enigmatic bird gets its name from its crown, which are short projections that resemble bare feather shafts. They are often compared to crows wearing red muffler scarves!

In many parts of Borneo, the Bornean Bristlehead has had a tough time and its population has declined significantly. Amongst the birdwatching community, they are on the ‘most wanted’ list and some will even pay good money for local knowledge on where to see them!

Birds of Borneo - Bornean Bristlehead

Source: http://www.hkbws.org.hk (Godwin-C)

So if you are one of the lucky ones to see this beautiful native of Borneo, make sure you whip out your camera, take a picture and remember where you are because it might just be a once-in-a-lifetime experience that you also get paid for!

The call of a Bornean Bristlehead captured by Marc Anderson

Where to spot the Bornean Bristlehead: These birds can be spotted in a few locations. Most recently, they have been sighted in Similajau National Park which is 25km northeast of Bintulu. They are also more regularly seen in Lambir Hills National Park.

Scarlet-rumped Trogon

Nope, these birds aren’t characters from Angry Birds, even though they look like one! The Scarlet-rumped Trogon sport a black hood and red body, along with white-black wings and tail. You can definitely tell them apart from their distinctive blue ‘eyebrow’, which gives them their grumpy look!

Birds of Borneo

Source: Ryan Maigan Birds

The call of the Scarlet-rumped Trogon has been used in many Hollywood films that feature lush green jungles! Many people have associated this bird’s call with the tropics of the southern Pacific Ocean. It’s interesting to think that even though most of the world has heard their voice, they belong to our very own forests!

The call of a Scarlet-rumped Trogon captured by Mike Nelson

Where to spot the Helmeted Hornbill: These birds can be found chirping their days away in lowland primary forests like Kubah National Park, Mulu National Park, and Batang Ai National Park.

Peregrine Falcon

If you think the cheetah is the fastest animal on earth, think again! OK, well technically it is but in the sky, you’ll find a bird that can glide effortlessly past a cheetah in full flight. The peregrine falcon has no problem cruising at speeds of 40-60 mph, but when in pursuit of their prey, they can reach up to 200 mph. That’s 293 feet per second and almost 3 times as fast as a cheetah!

© Jesse Gibson

At one stage on the verge of extinction, thanks to robust recovery efforts in North America, the Peregrine Falcon population has now recovered. However, only a lucky few spot them in Sarawak, and with their their bullet-train like speeds, you need to be extra observant when trying to spot one!

The call of a Peregrine Falcon captured by Lard Edenius

Where to spot the Peregrine Falcon: Peregrine Falcons are an elusive species in Sarawak but the best place to spot them is at the peak of Batu Lawi Hill, which now serves as an extension to Pulong Tau National Park.

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Delving into Sarawak’s Magnificent Caves

Bizarre wildlife found in the jungles of exotic Borneo

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Malaysia Travel Guide

Bizarre wildlife found in the jungles of exotic Borneo

Ask any Malaysian what is the first thing that comes to mind when they think of Sarawak and we bet most of them would give you the same answer: Magnificent mountains, wildlife, age-old rainforests, beautiful beaches and colossal caves.

This natural landscape allows for extraordinary biodiversity to exist while nurturing some of the world’s best-kept secrets… Or should we say, creatures? Most people have heard stories about the ubiquitous Hornbill that’s emblemetic to Sarawak but what’s out there that maybe you haven’t heard about?

Read on and learn about some of the most exotic and adorable, (OK sometimes!) animals that call our beautiful jungle home. We’ll even tell you where you can find them so you can play your own fun game of “Where’s Waldo?” Malaysian Wildlife edition! Believe us, there is #MoreSarawak than you know!

Horsfield’s Tarsier

These adorable little critters look eerily similar to a particular character from Star Wars. If you’re guessing Yoda, you’re right! Except that they don’t talk in riddles or read your minds – their superpower lies in their excellent leaping and climbing skills.

They are nocturnal, but thankfully, their big eyes to help them manoeuvre in the dark. Interesting fact, the size of one eyeball of the Horsfield’s Tarsier is the same as their brain. This makes them the largest-eyed mammal in the world relative to their body size!

Tarsier clinging to a branch

Photo by Christine Wehrmeier on Unsplash

Don’t be fooled by their cute demeanour, though! They are the only living carnivorous primate species. They feed on insects and small invertebrates, using their sharp sense of hearing and their nifty hands to detect and ensnare their prey.

Where to find them: Mulu National Park

Sun Bear

Even though they’re small, they can be very aggressive so if you see one, don’t mistake it for a cuddly teddy bear! The sun bear is arboreal, so you’ll need to keep your eyes on the trees if you want to see one and you can only see them in our rain forests in Southeast Asia.

They are essential to our ecosystem because they help disperse seeds while also keeping pesky termites in check, which means there is less destruction of our tropical trees which in turn means our atmosphere is clean enough for us to live healthily.

When they do come down from the trees, they also dig for invertebrates in the soil, enhancing the forest’s nutrient cycle through the mixing of rich and poor soil. Unfortunately, their global population has declined 30% over the last few years, making them the second rarest bear species next to the Giant Panda.

wildlife in Borneo - sun bear

iStock: wrangel

Their tongues are up to 25 cm long and help them to satiate their voracious appetite for honey. Because of this, they are also sometimes known as “honey bears”. You can tell the Sun Bear apart from other bear species from the horseshoe marks on their chest. Fun fact: No two markings are the same!

Where to see them: Matang Wildlife Centre

Microhyla Nepenthicola

If that’s too much of a mouthful, you can call it the “Matang narrow-mouthed frog”. That’s only the easy part. Spotting one of these rare creatures in the wild is, well rare! This newly discovered species is the second smallest frog in the world, around the size of a pea, and they make their homes around pitcher plants. They can only be found near Mount Serapi which is located in Kubah National Park.

wildlife in Borneo - second smallest frog in the world

Source: Reuters

They were discovered after scientists tracked the unique and powerful croaks of the males. Talk about a little body with a big voice! Because they were only discovered recently, not much is known about them. However, if you are lucky enough to spot one, make sure you are wearing ear plugs!

Where to find them: Kubah National Park

Sambar Deer

Did you know that the heaviest recorded Sambar Deer weighed an eye watering 550kg?! That’s slightly more than half a ton! So if you do go looking for the Sambar deer, make sure you are wearing running shoes!

sambar deer at matang wildlife center

Source: Matang Widlife Center

Despite their relatively large stature, these animals are pretty elusive; They are only really active at dusk and at night. When disturbed, their first instinct is to freeze before responding to predators with loud barks and foot stomping.

If that isn’t enough to frighten anyone or anything, their mane will rise in a confrontational manner! Imagine this half-a-ton of muscle and jungle survivor towering over you! Like I said, make sure you are wearing running shoes.

Where to find them: Mulu National Park and Matang Wildlife Center

Lesser Mouse Deer

Don’t be fooled by its name! Even though they look like a combination of a mouse and a cute deer, the mouse deer is neither a mouse nor a deer! Confusing I know but you can’t blame us for its name!

These shy, mysterious little critters are less than 50cm long and can be found on forest floors feeding on leaves, shoots, fruits and sometimes even fungi. With round bodies and spindly legs, they look almost like plush toys!

lesser mouse deer

Source: critterfacts.com

But while they may look like toys, peek inside a Mouse Deer’s mouth (we don’t recommend you do so), and you’ll find long fangs that give Dracula a run for his money!

Despite being land mammals, they can also hold their breath for up to four minutes and to escape prey, they’ll often leap into water and actually scurry across river beds to avoid getting caught! Yes, they can even hold their breath for 4 minutes underwater!

Due to their small size, they are commonly preyed upon by other animals, so they have to live quiet and secluded lives. However, a male will angrily beat his hooves when agitated or to ward off predators and warn other Mouse Deer of danger.

Where to find them: Lambir Hills National Park

Hornbill

There are so many things to be said about our state mascot. Sporting majestic beaks, Hornbills have impressive neck muscles (to support the weight of their regal bills) and are incredibly loyal to their families. They mate for life and will bond to defend each other against predators!

These beautiful feathered creatures also have their own ‘language’ – They speak to each other in a sort of morse code! It’s been said that the noise resembles that of a steam engine. This form of ‘communication’ is especially important and it’s how a male Hornbill sends messages to his mate through the barricade she makes during her nesting period.

rhinocerous hornbill

Source: Casper1774 Studio/Shutterstock

Hornbills have a great significance in Dayak culture. For them, Hornbills signify the spirit of God, and they have to be treated with respect. It is said that if a Hornbill is sighted flying over their residences, good luck will be granted to the whole community!

Altogether there are 54 species of Hornbills in the world, 8 of which are found in Sarawak! No wonder Sarawak is known as the “Land of the Hornbills”.

Where to find them: Piasau Nature Reserve, Mulu National Park, Tanjung Datu National Park and Batang Ai National Park

Slow Loris

Tiny, cute, big eyes… But not cuddly! Although they look adorable, these nocturnal creatures are one of the few venomous mammals in the world.

slow lorris clinging to tree branch

Source: wordatlas.com

Surf the internet long enough and you might recall watching a video of a Slow Loris getting tickled. What many people don’t know is that the pose of the Slow Loris of its arms raised is a defensive pose and not one of enjoyment.

Unfortunately, not many people knew this, and when this video gained traction, many people wanted to own Slow Lorises as pets because of how ‘cute’ it looked.

As slow lorises are venomous with a potentially deadly bite, their sharp pointed teeth are often clipped with nail cutters without anaesthesia for the pet trade.

This makes the pet trade one of the greatest threats to the survival of this species, which places them as vulnerable on the IUCN red list. Here in Sarawak we’re protecting all our Slow Loris as best we can. Have fun looking for them but don’t try and tickle them!

Where to find them: Bako National Park

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Little Known Secrets of the Beads of Borneo

Meeting Borneo’s Majestic Orangutans

Cycling for Charity in Sarawak

Kuching Caving | Gua Sireh  Broken Jar

Seeing Green in Bario

Fine tradition of longevity noodle making kept alive

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Malaysia Travel Guide

10 Things To Do in Kuching

1. Meet The People

Visit the well-preserved Bidayuh Longhouses at Kampung Annah Rais, Kampung Benuk, Kampung Mongkos or Kampung Pueh; perfect for photo ops and an insight into Bidayuh (Land Dayak) culture.

Trek above the clouds to kampung Semban, a very traditional Bidayuh community where older women still wear brass arm, leg and neck rings.

Visit Iban Longhouses on the Lemanak River or around Batan Ai Hyro Lake.  Sample home brewed rice wine (tuak), enjoy fresh jungle produce ans try your hand at blowpipe shooting.  Ornately tattooed elders will entertain you with tales of their headhunter ancestors and show off their traditional dancing skills.

annah rais

Two-elderly-Ibans-at-their-longhouse-batang-ai

Batang Ai National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia

2. Go For A Walk

Discover Kuching’s Historic City Centre, by yourself or through a guided walk or bicycle tour.  Climb Mount Santubong, for a birds-eye view of the city and the coastline, or take to the trails of Kubah National Park to discover rare and fascinating plant species and idyllic jungle waterfalls.  Visit Gunung Gading National Park for a close-up view of the Rafflesia, the world’s largest flower, amindst stunning rainforest scenery.

Visit Tanjung Datu National Park, at the remote southern tip of Sarawak, to trek through rugged, jungle terrain to deserted white sand beaches.  Or explore the beautiful upriver scenery of Batang Ai, staying overnight in Iban Longhouses and jungle camps.

Sarawak-Kuching-Kubah-National-Park

Quiet Beach in Malaysia Tanjung National Park Sarawak

3. Wildlife Encounters

Visit Matang Wildlife Centre to encounter young orphaned orangutans and sun bears and learn about the wildlife rehabilitation process.  Then check out Semenggoh Nature Reserve and its thriving population of semi-wild orangutans, or go for frog-spotting in Kubah National Park, home of Asia’s smallest frog species.  Take a boat to Bako National Park to view the rare proboscis monkey, as well as long-tailed macaque monkeys, Bornean bearded pigs, colugos and many colourful bird and reptile species.

Head upriver to Batang Ai National Park to follow the Red Ape Trail.  This area has possibly the world’s highest population density of wild orangutans and encounters are quite frequent.

BAKO NATIONAL PARK, Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia

Frog Kubah

orangutan batang ai

4. Take To The Water

Take a Sarawak River cruise to discover Kuching from the water, and watch the sunset reflected in the water as the sun sinks over Mount Serapi.  Or hire one of the local tambang ferries to explore the riverside at your own pace.

Go Irrawaddy dolphin spotting and crocodile watching in Kuching Wetlands National Park, or visit Satang Island to see the marine turtle hatchery and enjoy snorkelling with the green turtles.  If you prefer to paddle you own canoe, try rainforest kayaking or rafting along the Upper Sarawak River, sea kayaking aroung the Santubong Rover and the Bako-Buntal Bay.

talang satang

wildlife cruise kuching wetlands santubong fisherman and dolphin

5. Underground Sarawak

Take part in a caving adventure int the limestone hills around Bau or Serian.  Beginner, intermediate and advanced level activities are offered and equipment is supplied.  Less adventurous visitors will enjoy the easily accessible caves area Bau, a short drive from Kuching.  The Wind Cave, is long and narrow with beautiful rock formations and a cooling breeze, while the Fairy Cave is more imposing, with extensive cave vegetation and a Chinese shrine at the cave mouth.

Bau Cave

sarawak borneo kuching bau wind cave

5-sarawak borneo playground Bau Wind Cave opening

6. Underwater Sarawak

The best wreck dives (including a WWII Japanese Destroyer) require at least an Advanced Open Water, but there are great muck dive and snorkeling sites around the turtle sanctuary islands offshore from Kuching.  You can dive in search of marine turtles in the morning and learn about their conservation in the afternoon.

sarawak borneo playground kuching wreck diving

sarawak borneo playground kuching wreck diving (6)

7. Food Drink

Kuching is famous for its celebrated noodle dishes, spicy Sarawak Laksa and savoury Kolo Mee, as well as a wide selection of Chinese, Malay and Indian cuisine, exotic rainforest fruits, crispy jungle ferns and wonderful fresh seafood.  Dining options range from humble hawker stalls, through waterside seafood restaurants at Kampung Buntal and traditional Chinese delicacies at Siniawan Night Market to opulent fine dining outlets in 5-star hotels, and you can even learn to cook Sarawak-style.  Kuching’s most famous drink is teh-c-peng, a multi layered tea and palm sugar concoction worth of a brochure b y itself.  In the villages and longhouses you can try native cuisine such as manok pansuh (chicken steamed in bamboo tubes) and fresh jungle produce, accompanied by a glass of tuak.

Laksa Sarawak

Laksa Sarawak

kolokmee

Sarawak-Kuching-Adventure-Ikan-Pansuh

8. Culture Heritage

Follow in the footsteps of the White Rajahs around Kuching’s old city centre and the waterfront, taking in the Sarawak Museum, Islamic Museum, Old Courthouse, India Street Mosque, Textile Museum and many other unique heritage sites.  The cross the Sarawak River (by bridge or boat) to visit Fort Margherita, the Brooke Gallery and the exquisite Orchid Garden.  The surrounding Malay Kampungs have some fine examples of traditional and modern Malay architecture.

Learn about Sarawak’s traditional cultures at the award-winning Sarawak Cultural Village, stopping by en route to visit the world’s first Cat Museum, a prehistoric human figure and the tomb of Sarawak’s first and only Sultan.

Kuching Heritage Fort Margherita, Sarawak, Malaysia

sarawak-borneo-entertainment-rwmf-2012-day-2-afternoon

9. Shopping

Main Bazaar and Carpenter Street, the two oldest streets in Kuching, are packed with handicraft shops, art dealers and families practicing their traditional crafts, ranging from tinsmithing to coffin-making!  Nearby India Street is a pedestrian precinct with a fine selection of traditional clothing and textile outlets, and the adjacent Gambier Street is the place to buy spices ad utensils if you want to cook Sarawak-style.

In the Malay Kampungs across river, small family bakeries sell kek lapis (Sarawak layer cake), probably the state’s most popular souvenir.  Also across river, the colourful Satok Weekend Market iis renowned for the Bidayuh ladies selling handicrafts, forest produce, orchids and a whole range of local snacks and delicacies.

The potteries on Jalan Penrissen produce fine ceramics in a unique Teochew-Sarawak fusion style, and the potters are happy to be photographed at work.

The busy weekend market at the border village of Serikin, where Indonesian traders come to sell their wares, is a great place to buy cheap textiles, clothing, fresh fruits, jungle produce and handicrafts.  Heading north, the bustling and colourful Serian Market is a must-visit for fruit, vegetables, forest produce and amazing photo opportunities.

Seeing Kuching City on Foot

Visiting Sarawak As A Japanese Intern | All Time Favorites Local Food

Serikin Town Border Market

 

10. Festivals Celebrations

Rainforest World Music Festival: Every July, Sarawak Cultural Village.  The most exciting musical event in the region, and ranked among the top-25 world music festivals globally.

Kuching Festival: July and early August.  A month-long festival of musci, drama, arts, exhibitions and food, glorious food.

Sarawak Regatta:  Every November, Kuching Waterfront.  Dating from 1872, this is the biggest and best river regatta in Southeast Asia.  There’s even a category for visitors to join in.

Multi-Cultural Mooncake Festival: Mid-September Carpenter St.  Kuching’s Chinese community share the mid-autumn festival with everyone at a 4-day street party.

Pesta Benak (Tidal Bore Festival): November, Sri Aman.  Celebrates the Lupar River’s famous tidal bore.  Surfing and wave-riding competitions, water sports and nightly entertainment.

RWMF

sarawak-malaysia-borneo-sri-aman-colas-rathbone-surfing-tidal-bore-benak

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Malaysia Travel Guide

Cycling for Charity in Sarawak

Cycling for Charity in Sarawak

28 women calling themselves Bicycle Buddies from the UK and Singapore are currently in Kuching today to cycle in the Sarawak rainforest for charity.

The group began their cycling adventure from 22 to 28 September 2018 covering a distance of 50km to 60km per day passing through Annah Rais Longhouse in Padawan, Seniawan bazaar, Kubah National Park and ended in Lundu bazaar.

“Streets Against Sepsis” is their charity slogan of choice, dedicated to raising money for sepsis survivors in the UK and to raise awareness on sepsis symptoms, to protect the community and save lives.

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that arises when the body’s response to infection causes injury to its own tissue and organs.

Mel Greenway and Yvonne Konieczna, their leader who have been cycling together for over 15 years, Bicycle Buddies are not professional cyclists but enjoy exploring unique destinations and getting to know different cultures.

“However, there is another element to our ride; the route must be tough because they are raising money for their chosen charities,” said Mel and Yvonne said in a joint statement.

“We are very grateful to our tour manager JC Chua and his team for giving us the opportunity to have an amazing experience and are looking forward to what promises to be not only a challenging ride but also an incredible adventure,” they said.

With members ranging from 25 to 70 years old, the Bicycle Buddies are a diverse set of ladies like-minded for their love of cycling and passion for charity, and are looking forward to their cycling adventure.

Sarawak Tourism Board is in support to the publicity of this charity cycling tour as well as marketing and promotion in the UK.


For more information:

 Communications Unit

SARAWAK TOURISM BOARD

T: + 6 082-423600  |  F: + 6 082-416700

W: www.sarawaktourism.com

E: [email protected]

 25 September 2018

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Malaysia Travel Guide

Frog Tour At Kubah National Park

Kubah National Park is built with massive sandstone ridge with its three mountain peaks, the 911m high Gunung Serapi, Gunung Selang and Gunung Sendok.  Situated only 22 kilometers from Kuching City, Kubah National Park is one of the most accessible of National Parks in Sarawak.  Was established in 1989 and open to the public in 1995, cover an area of 2,230 hectares.

Home for Wallace’s Flying Frog named after Mr. Alfred Russell Wallace.  The 4th International Frog Race has been organized at Kubah National Park in conjunction with “Save The Frogs Day” on 25th April 2015.

Kubah National Park most famous features are its palms and its amphibian; with almost a hundred different palm species it is one of the suitable for any nature lover, contain extensive biodiversity, rich plant, bird ,world of palm and amphibian life of Serapi Range which is only 45 minutes drive from Kuching.  Premium and standard packages from day trip to overnight stay are available from tour operator design mainly for special interest tourist.

ITINENARY : KUBAH NATIONAL PARK AND FROG TOUR (DAY TRIP)

0845 hrs – Depart from Yayasan Sarawak for Kubah National Park

0945 hrs – Arrived at Matang Wildlife Centre for briefing.

SPE Frog Kubah

Group attended a briefing by officer in-charge at Matang Wildlife Centre before proceed for facilities inspection.

SPE Frog Kubah

Park Regulations

1030 hrs – Room inspection at Matang Wildlife.

1045 hrs – Went to Rayu Iban Longhouse for side inspection.

1110 hrs – Depart from Rayu Iban Longhouse to Matang Family Park for packed lunch.

1145 hrs – Briefing at Kubah National Park by our guide Mr. Gani from Straight Central Tours.

Briefing on Frog Pond and jungle trekking to Rayu Trail

Briefing on Frog Pond and jungle trekking to Rayu Trail

1200 hrs – Jungle Trekking to Frog pond.

Frog Kubah pond

1210 hrs – We proceed toward a waterfall junction before we proceed to another trail of Rayu.

1245 hrs – We reached Rayu trail entrance and discovered the 3.5km trek toward palm garden and later to park HQ.

Frog Kubah TROPICAL FOREST

Quite a challenging trek

1400 hrs – Reached park HQ.

1415 hrs – Proceed to Telaga Air Homestay for side seeing.

1500 hrs – Arrived at Telaga Air Homestay and visited Telaga Air Waterfront.

1530 hrs – Depart Telaga Air for Matang Wildlife Centre.

1600 hrs – Arrived at Matang Wildlife Centre.

1600 hrs – Free and easy.

1800 hrs – Dinner

1900 hrs – Meet the Amphibians specialist Mr. Pui Yong Min and briefing.

1930 hrs – Frog tour at Kubah National Park.

Frog Kubah

2230 hrs – Frog tour ended.

2330 hrs – Arrived Kuching.

STAR OF ATTRACTION AT KUBAH NATIONAL PARK

Wallace Flying Frog or Rhacophorus nigropalmatus also known as parachute frog. Live almost exclusively in the trees, descending only to mate and lay eggs.

Mr. Alfred Russel Wallace a naturalist and biologist, 1823-1913. Travel to Malay Archipelago in the early 1900. Did researched in Kubah National Park.

Wallace Flying Frog named after his discovery.

Wallace Flying Frog
Wallace Flying Frog

Note:

This trip is recommended to any type of visitor’s. Especially who are interested in Frog study or special interest tourist.

Also for coming future the Straight Central Tour will going to design a “SLOW LORIS TOUR” which is the first ever tour product in Sarawak. Fantastic Idea.

 

Prepared By:
Angela Linsam
Tourist Coordinator, VIC Kuching, Sarawak Tourism Board

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